web analytics
December 27, 2014 / 5 Tevet, 5775
 
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post
8000 meals Celebrate Eight Days of Chanukah – With 8,000 Free Meals Daily to Israel’s Poor

Join Meir Panim’s campaign to “light up” Chanukah for families in need.



An Illuminating Darkness

        “Wouldn’t it be nice if the days were long all year round?” commented my son at six o’clock in the evening as we sat down to dinner to the backdrop of the completely black outdoors.

 

         My high school daughter with her long school hours couldn’t agree more. “This morning I left our home in the dark, only to return once again, in the dark!”

 

         I, too, relish the sunlight and become energized by its warming rays and brightness.

 

         Yet the Hebrew months of Kislev and Tevet are characterized by their very long and dark, cold evenings. From all the months of the year, their bright daylight hours are minimal, and their hours of darkness the longest.

 

         Chanukah is called the Festival of Lights, celebrating the miracle of the lights, the cruse of oil that burnt for eight days. A more appropriate time to celebrate the bright shining candles might be in a time of year with increased light. But it is precisely in these dark months that we burn the Chanukah lights and celebrate their victory. Unlike the Menorah of the Temple (whose miracle we celebrate with our Chanukah lights), which was lit during the day and indoors, the Chanukah menorah is kindled in the dark and faces the outside night.

 

         Although by now the shining Chanukah candles have disappeared, and the menorahs have been stored away until next year, their vital message must be internalized.

 

         We may not enjoy the struggles and challenges that our own periods of darkness offer us. We don’t appreciate the pain, suffering or sorrow that accompanies such times. We yearn instead for times of light, happiness and brightness, for days that are filled with warmth, acceptance and appreciation rather than coldness, indifference and difficulty.

 

         But the Chanukah candles − that are lit precisely at this time of year, during the dark evenings, facing the cold, dark outdoors − radiate so brightly, particularly because of these dark circumstances surrounding them.

 

         The struggles and challenges in our lives are meant to kindle within us a strong, beautiful light that perhaps wouldn’t even be noticed or appreciated in the summer months of our lives.

 

         The first two letters of the word Chanukah spell chen, meaning beauty. Chen represents that aspect of beauty, which is comprised of two inverse elements reflecting each other. The opposites that form the graceful beauty of Chanukah are darkness and light, or how the darkness (choshech) is transformed into light (nehora), whose initial letters themselves spell the word chen. (From an article by Rabbi Yitzchak Ginsberg on www.inner.org.)

 

         Pieces of art also interplay inverse elements to create a thing of beauty. Light with shadow is intertwined regularly to form artistic creations.

 

         At first glance, a shadow is something concealing light. But on a deeper perception, the shadow provides an important effect. Though its “illumination” is different than the revelation or the effect of the light, the shadow can enhance and highlight the effects of the light.

 

         Similarly, these dark months and the dark moments in our lives are a backdrop that must also be used positively to appreciate the light and enhance its contrast. Moreover, our challenges dare us to use the darkness in a way that it becomes transformed into something positive and constructive.

 

         Learn a valuable lesson from your challenge. Gain sensitivity from your pain or suffering to enable you to help others in similar situations. Discover an inner light and strength that you never thought was there.

 

         The message of the Chanukah lights extends well beyond its eight-day holiday and gives us strength as we head back out into the ensuing darkness. These lights beckon us to use all of our experiences − even the dark ones − as a point of growth and illumination, to radiate light to those around us.

 

          CHANA WEISBERG is the author of The Crown of Creation and The Feminine Soul.  She is the dean of the Institute of Jewish Studies in Toronto and is a scholar in residence for www.askmoses.com.  She is also a columnist for www.chabad.org’s Weekly Magazine.  Weisberg lectures regularly and welcomes your comments or inquiries at: weisberg@sympatico.caDivine Whispers – Stories that Speak to the Heart and Soul by Chana Weisberg (Targum/Feldheim) has just been released.  To purchase your copy, please write to divinewhispers@gmail.comor visit your local judaic bookstore.   

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “An Illuminating Darkness”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
A clip from"How to Stab a Jew," the latest hit on Arab social media.
‘How to Stab a Jew’ Going Viral on Palestinian Authority Social Media [video]
Latest Sections Stories
Collecting-History-logo

An incredible child protégé and a world chess champion, Boris Spassky (1937- ), best known for his “Match of the Century” loss in Reykjavík to Fischer, will always be inexorably tied to the latter.

book-super-secret-diary

Who hasn’t experienced how hard it can be to fit in?

In our times, most of us when we pray, our minds are on something else-it is hard to focus all the time.

The participants discussed the rich Jewish-Hungarian heritage, including that two-thirds of the fourteen Hungarian Nobel Prize winners have Jewish origin.

Today’s smiles are in the merit of my friend and I made a conscious effort to smile throughout the day.

When someone with a fixed mindset has a negative interaction with a friend or loved one, he or she immediately projects that rejection onto him or herself saying: “I’m unlovable.”

How many potential shidduchim are not coming about because we, the mothers, are not allowing them to go through?

Is the Torah offering nechama by subtly hinting that death brings reunion with loved ones who preceded you?

She approached Holofernes and, with a sword concealed under her robe, severed his head.

Here are examples of games that need to be played by more than one person and an added bonus: they’re all Shabbos-friendly.

The incident was completely unforeseeable. The only term to describe the set of circumstances surrounding it is “freak occurrence.”

The first Chabad Center in Broward County, Chabad of South Broward, now runs nearly fifty programs and agencies. T

More Articles from Chana Weisberg

We’re on one of those really long family road trips. The kind that parenting experts advise will imprint fond memories on your children’s psyche. (How’s that for guilt?) And the kind on which you never leave home without a bottle of Tylenol and your favorite cup of strongly caffeinated, black coffee.

We’re on one of those really long family road trips. The kind that parenting experts advise will imprint fond memories on your children’s psyche. (How’s that for guilt?) And the kind on which you never leave home without a bottle of Tylenol and your favorite cup of strongly caffeinated, black coffee.

Last week, I bought a new brand of detergent.

It promises to remove all stains, even those stubborn, impossible to remove ones–or your money back. Guaranteed.

Last week, I bought a new brand of detergent.

It promises to remove all stains, even those stubborn, impossible to remove ones–or your money back. Guaranteed.

From the great synagogue in Tel Aviv to his performances in the role of Jean Valjean in the hit Broadway show Les Miserables, Dudu Fisher is an international star singer and cantor.

From the great synagogue in Tel Aviv to his performances in the role of Jean Valjean in the hit Broadway show Les Miserables, Dudu Fisher is an international star singer and cantor.

He looks at me with such a wistful expression in his clear blue eyes. His young shoulders are sagging and he appears to be carrying the world’s burdens.

He looks at me with such a wistful expression in his clear blue eyes. His young shoulders are sagging and he appears to be carrying the world’s burdens.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/jewess-press/an-illuminating-darkness/2007/01/03/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: