web analytics
October 22, 2014 / 28 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post
Meir Panim with Soldiers 5774 Roundup: Year of Relief and Service for Israel’s Needy

Meir Panim implements programs that serve Israel’s neediest populations with respect and dignity. Meir Panim also coordinated care packages for families in the South during the Gaza War.



A Churning Stomach And An Upturned Nose

Several weeks ago, there was back and forth “dialogue” in the editorial pages of the Jewish Press concerning the very subjective view as to who is the more “authentic” Jew amongst the various segments of the Orthodox community. The stomach churning (read sickening) “holier than thou” attitude coloring the remarks exchanged in the letters sadly triggered a memory of another stomach churning experience – both figuratively and literally - the day after I arrived in Israel this past Chanukah.

As a treat for an upcoming milestone birthday, and because I wanted to spend money in Israel, I stayed in an upscale hotel in Jerusalem, one with the “feast your eyes and eat all you can stuff into yourself” breakfast buffet that Israeli hotels are famous for.

When I went down for my first ever “hotel breakfast” – having arrived the evening before, I was overwhelmed by the fruits, cheeses, egg dishes, pancakes, hot cereals, smoked fish, breads, crackers, cold cereals, jams, marmalades, juices pastries, cookies and cakes that constitute a tourist’s morning meal.

But while it was about 9:30 am Jerusalem time, it was 2:30 am for my digestive system, a time I normally am fast asleep, and maybe dreaming of food, but not actually feasting on it.

After a coffee and some crackers with cheese, my stomach let me know enough was enough – literally. Knowing that I might end up having a jet lagged induced nap and wake up starving, I decided to take up some fruit and cookies up to my room. As I started to put a fig into a small baggie I had found on the table, I heard a female, yet no-nonsense type of voice behind me exclaim in English, “What are you doing?” Being trained from birth to be polite, I turned around and answered, ” I’m taking some food.”

“You can’t do that,” I was firmly advised by what I assumed was a self-appointed food police – (or else she would have been wearing a white blouse with a bow-tie.) The woman reprimanding me was tall, thin, and wearing a long robe.

“Why not?” I asked genuinely puzzled, adding in a moment of inspiration that I was a guest at the hotel – although I had concluded that since she was not a hotel employee, it was none of her business.

“Because you’re stealing,” she exclaimed in a self-righteous voice and with a nose quivering in a manner very similar to the way a nose would in a fish store during a blackout. Stunned equally by her accusation and her “holier than thou” aura, I could only look at her as she spun on her heels – and walked away. (Her nose by the way was up so high I thought she might scrape it on the ceiling).

Now, although I was new to eating in Israeli hotels, I had throughout my youth and adulthood been at kosher hotels in the Catskills and Florida. It went without saying that because there was no lunch served, guests would take fruits, pastries and other breakfast items up to their rooms “for later”.

As far as I’m concerned, doing so can almost be considered a minhag practiced by all streams of Judaism. Looking around me, I noticed that my fellow guests appeared to be quite machmir in this area, with a slightly different twist. Plates were piled high with a week’s worth of breakfast and not wanting to be wasteful, guests were taking the intact leftovers out of the breakfast room.

To this day, I ask myself what possessed a person – to approach a stranger and publicly accuse her of stealing? Even if it was true – that it was gnaiva to remove even a raisin from the dining room, why would she think that putting a fellow Jew in a situation where she could be embarrassed was preferable than letting the “thief” get away?

Based on her tone of voice and her body language – which was full of disdain, I felt that she looked down on me. Could it be that in her mind, I was not observant as she? (Maybe because I’m from Canada, any temperature above 50 F causes me to dress summerishly, meaning shorter sleeved shirts and open toe sandals.)

My aggrieved 2:30 in the morning stomach churned even more from the distress I felt that day. In the holy city of Yerushalayim, in walking distance of the most sacred site in the world, I had been exposed to sinat chinam that was responsible for our miserable exile and the remnant wall we wail at - when once we had a magnificent Temple that heralded Hashem’s Glory and ours as His Chosen People, blessed with the mission of being an example to the rest of the people of this world.

Good thing that Moshiach wasn’t a guest at the hotel. He might have left Israel for good!

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “A Churning Stomach And An Upturned Nose”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Chaye Zisel Braun
Funeral for Chaye Zisel Braun Underway [photos]
Latest Sections Stories

It is important for a therapist to focus on a person’s strengths as a way of overcoming his or her difficulties.

Sadly, there are mothers who, due to severe depression are unable or unwilling to prepare nourishing food for their children.

Michal had never been away from home. And now, she was going so far away, for so long – an entire year!

Though if you do have a schach mat, you’ll realize that it cannot actually support the weight of the water.

Social disabilities occur at many levels, but experts identify three different areas of learning and behavior that are most common for children who struggle to create lasting social connections.

Sukkot is an eternal time of joy, and if we are worthy, of plenty.

Two of our brothers, Jonathan Pollard and Alan Gross, sit in the pit of captivity. We have a mandate to see that they are freed.

Chabad of South Broward has 15 Chabad Houses in ten cities.

Victor Center works in partnership with healthcare professionals, clergy, and the community to sponsor education programs and college campus out reach.

So just in case you’re stuck in the house this Chol HaMoed – because there’s a new baby or because someone has a cold – not because of anything worse, here are six ideas for family fun at home.

We are told that someone who says that God’s mercy extends to a bird’s nest should be silenced.

More Articles from Cheryl Kupfer
Kupfer-092614-Books

Not knowing any better, I assumed that Molly and her mother must be voracious readers.

Kupfer-080114

Unpleasant happenings are quickly discarded if they do not affect us directly.

I have always insisted that everything that happens to anyone or anything is min Shamayim.

It is so hurtful to heighten people’s sense of inadequacy and guilt in a matzav that is already horrendous and difficult to bear.

Make no mistake: in the wrong hands cars are weapons of mass destruction.

Where once divorce in heimische communities was relatively uncommon, nowadays every family has a son, daughter, sibling cousin who is divorced – sometimes twice or even three times!

Many go about the business of living frum, observant lives, but they are only going through the motions.

Lately I have been hearing quiet grumblings from people who admit that they regret not encouraging their sons to get a post-high school education after a year or two of learning.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/a-churning-stomach-and-an-upturned-nose/2004/05/19/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: