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April 18, 2015 / 29 Nisan, 5775
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Glimpses Into American Jewish History
Dr. Aaron Friedenwald
 

Posted on: April 2nd, 2015

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

This was a most unusual step to take in those days, given the difficulties of travel to Europe. Nonetheless, on May 1, 1860 he sailed from New York on the steamship Hammonia.

Glimpses-030615
 

Posted on: March 6th, 2015

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The ship’s captain apparently respected the Friedenwalds’ strict adherence to halacha because he allowed them to use his cabin for davening and other religious observances.

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Glimpses-logo-NEW
 

Posted on: February 4th, 2015

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Penn wrote the following to a friend in England: “I found them [the Indians of the eastern shore of North America] with like countenances with the Hebrew race; and their children of so lively a resemblance to them that a man would think himself in Duke’s place, or Barry street, in London, when he sees them.”

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Posted on: January 2nd, 2015

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

There were many who believed that some North America Indians were descended from Jews.

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Posted on: December 4th, 2014

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

One might think to attribute the crudeness of the calendar to the fact that it was produced by a frontier community unable to calculate a more precise table.

Hazzan Abraham Lopes Cardozo
 

Posted on: November 5th, 2014

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

“Throughout his life, he observed Tisha B’Ab as the Nahalah (anniversary) for all of his relatives who were murdered, as this is the national Jewish day of mourning.

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Posted on: October 2nd, 2014

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Practically to his last days the patriarchal founder was at his office almost daily and took an active interest in all matters connected with the business.

 

Posted on: September 3rd, 2014

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

In 1787 Jonas wrote a letter to Congress asking that the federal Constitution guarantee religious liberty in the state of Pennsylvania.

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Jonas Phillips
 

Posted on: July 31st, 2014

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Like many of his contemporaries, he went through some hard years, but eventually he earned the rewards of his perseverance and integrity.

 

Posted on: July 2nd, 2014

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

These letters give us the privilege of knowing him in his old age when he is mellow, tempered in his judgments, and sagacious from long experience of dealing with people.

Gershom Mendes Seixas
 

Posted on: June 3rd, 2014

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The British evacuated New York on November 25, 1783, and Congress demobilized the American army shortly thereafter.

Reverend Gershom Mendes Seixas
 

Posted on: May 1st, 2014

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

“Simple, modest, altogether unassuming, Gershom spent his happiest hours with his ever-growing family who were never far from his thoughts.

Levine-Dr-Yitzchok-NEW
 

Posted on: April 3rd, 2014

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

“Attuned to the ideal of establishing a new Zion in free America, they named their new colony Palestine.

 

Posted on: March 5th, 2014

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Last month’s column outlined some efforts during the first half of the nineteenth century to establish Jewish agricultural colonies in America. In only one case was a colony actually established.

 

Posted on: February 5th, 2014

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

There were very few Jewish farmers in Europe during the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Indeed, in many parts of Europe Jews were forbidden to own land. Despite this there were some Jews who always felt they should return to the agrarian way of life their forefathers had pursued in ancient times, and that America was an ideal place to establish Jewish agricultural colonies.

 

Posted on: January 1st, 2014

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The President having signed the Treaty of the Geneva Conference and the Senate having, on the 16th instant, ratified the President's actions, the American Association of the Red Cross, organized under provisions of said treaty, purposes to send its agents at once among the sufferers by the recent floods, with a view to the ameliorating of their condition so far as can be done by human aid and the means at hand will permit. Contributions are urgently solicited.

Last photo of Abraham Lincoln
 

Posted on: December 4th, 2013

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Last month’s column sketched the myriad of social programs in which the Orthodox American communal worker and leader Adolphus S. Solomons (1826-1910) was involved. Adolphus married Rachel Seixas Phillips (1828-1881), a descendant of colonial patriot families and together they had eight daughters and a son.

Adolphus Simson Solomons
 

Posted on: October 30th, 2013

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

There are many observant Jews who contributed much to secular and Jewish life in America and yet have, unfortunately, been essentially forgotten. One such man is Adolphus Simson Solomons (1826-1910).

 

Posted on: October 2nd, 2013

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Cholera was officially recognized to be of epidemic proportions in New York City on June 26, 1832. The epidemic was at its peak in July and 3,515 out of a population of about 250,000 died. (The equivalent death toll in today’s city of eight million would exceed 100,000.) Sadly, in 1832 there were no effective treatments available for those who contracted this disease.

Reverend Henry Pereira Mendes
 

Posted on: September 3rd, 2013

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

As this is our third column on the Reverend Dr. Henry Pereira Mendes, we’ll begin with a summary of his life.

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Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/glimpses-ajh/dr-aaron-friedenwald-19th-century-orthodox-physician-part-i/2015/04/02/

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