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September 2, 2014 / 7 Elul, 5774
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Bibi’s Approval Drops While US Jews Stay Connected (Guests Jeremy Saltan & Rabbi Avi Berman)
 
Lady Gaga Pre-Tel Aviv Concert ‘Shalom’ Video Irks Some Arab Fans

September 2, 2014 - 11:11 PM
 
British Jew Pleads ‘Not Guilty’ to Assaulting MP George Galloway

September 2, 2014 - 10:45 PM
 
Honey Sales Expected to Soar as Rosh Hashanah Approaches

September 2, 2014 - 9:59 PM
 
US Pushes PA Agenda and Tells Israel to Cancel New Gush Etzion Town

September 2, 2014 - 9:48 PM
 
ISIS Beheaded American Journalist Steven Sotloff And Posted Video

September 2, 2014 - 9:45 PM
 
Second Terror Attack Averted When Arab Driver Killed by IDF Fire

September 2, 2014 - 7:51 PM
 
Eric Cantor Joins Wall Street Investment Bank

September 2, 2014 - 4:06 PM
 
Poll: Hamas Would Rule Judea and Samaria in New Elections

September 2, 2014 - 3:52 PM
 
Arab Terrorist Attack Foiled Near Netanya

September 2, 2014 - 1:38 PM
 
Ehud Olmert’s ‘Talansky Affair’ Re-Opens in Jerusalem District Court

September 2, 2014 - 12:58 PM
 
Iran Unveils New Self-Defense Radar, Missile System

September 2, 2014 - 12:04 PM
 
Turkey’s New PM Says ‘No Hope’ of Normalizing Ties with Israel

September 2, 2014 - 11:22 AM
 
Jihadist Threat Rising on Israel’s Northern Border

September 2, 2014 - 9:58 AM
 
Germany to Begin Supplying Kurds With Weapons to Fight Islamic State

September 2, 2014 - 1:41 AM
 
Did You Know September 1 is an Israeli National Holiday?

September 2, 2014 - 1:02 AM
 
SodaStream May Close Maaleh Adumim Factory

September 1, 2014 - 11:41 PM
 
Last Soldier Killed in Protective Edge Laid to Rest

September 1, 2014 - 11:31 PM
 
Arab Rock Throwing Attacks Wounds 3-Year-Old Girl

September 1, 2014 - 11:22 PM
 
The Real and Radical Legacy of Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach

September 1, 2014 - 11:05 PM
 
PA Propaganda Video Compares 9/11 with IDF Bombing of Gaza

September 1, 2014 - 9:45 PM
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Glimpses Into American Jewish History
Baltimore Hebrew Congregation Building
 

Posted on: December 5th, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

While it is not known precisely when Jews first settled in Baltimore, we do know that five Jewish men and their families settled there during the 1770s. However, it was not until the autumn of 1829 that Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, whose Hebrew name was Nidchei Yisroel (Dispersed of Israel), was founded. This was the only Jewish congregation in the state of Maryland at the time, and it was referred to by many as the “Stadt Shul.”

 

Posted on: November 1st, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Early American Jewish history is unfortunately replete with examples of observant families who came to America and, within a relatively short period of time, not only abandoned much of their commitment to religious observance but even had the sad experience of having some of their children intermarrying and assimilating. One family that did not follow this trend was the Hays family.

 

Posted on: October 4th, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

For centuries Jews have believed America to be a land of freedom and financial opportunity. One such Jew was Moses Raphael Levy, who achieved tremendous financial success as an American colonial merchant.

Glimpses-090712
 

Posted on: September 5th, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Last month’s column sketched the life of Reverend Myer Isaacs, concentrating primarily on his efforts to preserve and foster Orthodoxy in New York City, where he served as the spiritual leader of Congregation Shaaray Tefila from its founding in 1845 to his passing in 1879. Reverend Isaacs’s sphere of influence was not limited to New York. His efforts encompassed a broad range of activities throughout America designed to strengthen Orthodoxy in its battle against the Reform movement.

Rev. Samuel Myer Isaacs
 

Posted on: August 1st, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Unless otherwise noted, all quotations are from “The Forerunners – Dutch Jewry in the North America Diaspora” by Robert P. Swierenga, Wayne State University Press, Detroit, 1994. The nineteenth century witnessed a decline in religious observance by most of American Jewry. Changes were instituted in Orthodox synagogues that led many of them to affiliate with […]

Henry S. Hendricks
 

Posted on: July 5th, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Unless otherwise indicated, all quotes are from “Necrology: Henry S. Hendricks (1892-1959)” by David de Sola Pool, Publications of the American Jewish Historical Society (1893 -1961); Sep 1959-Jun 1960; 49, 1-4 AJHS Journal, available online at http://www.ajhs.org/scholarship/adaje.cfm The sad fact is that within a few generations virtually all the descendants of the Jews who came […]

Abraham Lincoln's use of the term'"four score and seven years ago' may have been borrowed from a rabbi's Fourth of July sermon
 

Posted on: June 1st, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The Jewish population of the United States in 1860 was somewhere between 150,000-200,000. Approximately 3,000 Jews fought on the Confederate side in the Civil War while 7,000 were found on the Union side.

 

Posted on: May 2nd, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Usually Jewish history books deal with those who have made their mark by doing extraordinary things. While such people obviously are important, there are those who may not have enjoyed much fame yet whose efforts and accomplishments were crucial to maintaining Yahadus in their community. Two such men are Henry S. Hartogensis and his son, Benjamin H. Hartogensis, who devoted their lives to the Jewish community of Baltimore.

 

Posted on: April 4th, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Washington, D.C. was created in 1790 as a result of a political compromise. “Washington was a Federal city. It did not have a ‘State’ government. It was under the direct control of Congress for even the simplest of things; schools, streets, courts and land use by private individuals and corporations. Accordingly, Congress dutifully passed on the last day of the first session of the 28th Congress, June 17, 1844, ‘A Bill, concerning conveyances or devices of places of public worship in the District of Columbia.’

Old B'nai Israel Synagogue and Cohen Community House
 

Posted on: February 29th, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

In 1519 Alonso Álvarez de Pineda, Spanish explorer and cartographer, led an expedition into Texas with the goal of finding a passage between the Gulf of Mexico and Asia. He and his men were probably the first Europeans to see the land that became known as Texas.

Reverend Arnold Fischel
 

Posted on: February 2nd, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Last month’s column outlined the struggle that took place at the beginning of the Civil War to get Congress to allow the appointment of Jewish army chaplains. Originally only Christian clergymen could serve as chaplains, and it was only as a result of pressure from the American Jewish community that in 1861 Congress passed a new law allowing ordained clergy of other religions to serve as chaplains. The Reverend Arnold (Adolph) Fischel (1830-1894) played a key role in this effort.

 

Posted on: January 4th, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

“The American tradition of the military chaplaincy is as old as the United States itself. Clergymen served with the armies of the individual colonies almost from the first battle of the Revolution, and provisions for the payment of chaplains were enacted by the Continental Congress as early as 1775.

 

Posted on: November 30th, 2011

In PrintFrom the Paper

During the nineteenth century a large number of American Jews abandoned traditional religious observance. This led to the United States being dubbed “di treifene medina” (the irreligious land).

 

Posted on: November 2nd, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Anyone familiar with Jewish history knows of the blood libels that have been used against Jews for centuries.

Glimpses-100711
 

Posted on: October 5th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

In general, little is known about Jewish women who resided in America during the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. Two exceptions are Rebecca Machado Phillips[i] and Rebecca Gratz[ii]. Another is Bilhah Abigail (Levy) Franks.

Glimpses-090211
 

Posted on: August 31st, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The Jews of New York City were rather late in establishing Jewish institutions such as poorhouses, homes for orphans and the aged, and hospitals. Several attempts were made in the years prior to 1850, but they failed due to the small size of the New Jewish community, which in 1836 numbered only about 2,000 and increased to about 7,000 in 1840.

Glimpses-080511
 

Posted on: August 3rd, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Sampson Simson was born on June 30, 1781 in Danbury, Connecticut and died January 7, 1857 in New York. Sampson's father, Solomon Simson, was also American born. Solomon was partners with his brother Sampson Simson, whom we shall refer to as Sampson the elder.

Glimpses-070111
 

Posted on: June 29th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Readers of this column are aware that it was not until 1840 that the first ordained Orthodox rabbi, Rabbi Abraham Rice,1 settled in America. Other rabbonim soon began to settle in America. One of them was Rabbi Abraham Joseph Ash.

Glimpses-060311
 

Posted on: June 1st, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The previous two columns discussed kashrus and bris milah observance in America during the 19th century. The trend was that until about 1860 most Jews were careful to observe these mitzvos. However, in the latter part of the century many Jews abandoned keeping kosher both at home and in public. Bris milah, though, was generally observed throughout the entire century.

Glimpses-050611-Bris
 

Posted on: May 4th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Last month's column dealt with the observance of kashrus by Jews in America during the 19th century. Up until about 1870 German Jewish immigrants went to considerable effort to make sure they could eat kosher meat and poultry. Almost every Jewish community of more than 15 families employed a professional shochet. Smaller communities were served by volunteer shochtim. However, with the spread of the Reform movement in the latter half of the century, Jews began to abandon kashrus.

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