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April 23, 2014 / 23 Nisan, 5774
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Destroying the Chametz Within and Truly Preparing for Pesach
 
Eyewitness Report from Ukraine: ‘You Can Feel the Tension in the Air’

April 23, 2014 - 1:32 PM
 
Common Blood Pressure Drug Prevents Post-TBI Epilepsy

April 23, 2014 - 12:46 PM
 
It’s Prom Time, and Abbas Must Choose a Dance Partner – Israel or Hamas

April 23, 2014 - 12:06 PM
 
Eyewitness in Ukraine: “Everyone is Expectant of Some Development; You Can Feel the Tension in the Air”

April 23, 2014 - 11:46 AM
 
Israeli-American Journalist Held Hostage in Ukraine

April 23, 2014 - 11:24 AM
 
Egypt Plays US off Russia, Gets Military Aid Back

April 23, 2014 - 11:18 AM
 
Shas Continues Petty Attacks Against Rav Amar for Control Over Sephardim

April 23, 2014 - 10:34 AM
 
More Jewish Sites Vandalized in Ukraine

April 22, 2014 - 9:53 PM
 
Syria to Hold Presidential Elections

April 22, 2014 - 9:25 PM
 
Egypt Signing Unprecedented $3 Billion MiG-35 Deal with Russia

April 22, 2014 - 8:44 PM
 
Missouri’s Jew-Hating Mayor Quits (Video)

April 22, 2014 - 8:00 PM
 
Jordan Summons Israeli Ambassador over Temple Mount Violence

April 22, 2014 - 6:28 PM
 
Archaeologists Find Ancient Chisel that May Have Helped Build Kotel

April 22, 2014 - 5:00 PM
 
IDF Announces Draft Notices to Christian Israelis

April 22, 2014 - 4:12 PM
 
Elite IDF Bedouin Trackers Eliminate Israel’s Northern Border Threats

April 22, 2014 - 3:55 PM
 
US Has Proof Syrian Gov’t Poisoned Civilians

April 22, 2014 - 3:00 PM
 
Gazan Rockets Pound Israeli Communities Over the Holiday

April 22, 2014 - 1:44 PM
 
Chief Rabbi of Nikolayev, Ukraine on Firebomb Attack

April 22, 2014 - 3:50 AM
 
Will Your Child be Born in ‘Israel’?

April 22, 2014 - 3:08 AM
 
All in the Family: BDS Protests Zabars; Carole Zabar Promotes BDS

April 20, 2014 - 11:09 PM
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Glimpses Into American Jewish History
Rev. Samuel Myer Isaacs
 

Rev. Samuel Myer Isaacs: Champion of Orthodoxy (Part I)

Posted on: August 1st, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Unless otherwise noted, all quotations are from “The Forerunners – Dutch Jewry in the North America Diaspora” by Robert P. Swierenga, Wayne State University Press, Detroit, 1994. The nineteenth century witnessed a decline in religious observance by most of American Jewry. Changes were instituted in Orthodox synagogues that led many of them to affiliate with […]

Henry S. Hendricks
 

Henry Solomon Hendricks

Posted on: July 5th, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Unless otherwise indicated, all quotes are from “Necrology: Henry S. Hendricks (1892-1959)” by David de Sola Pool, Publications of the American Jewish Historical Society (1893 -1961); Sep 1959-Jun 1960; 49, 1-4 AJHS Journal, available online at http://www.ajhs.org/scholarship/adaje.cfm The sad fact is that within a few generations virtually all the descendants of the Jews who came […]

Abraham Lincoln's use of the term'"four score and seven years ago' may have been borrowed from a rabbi's Fourth of July sermon
 

A Jewish Father’s Letter To Abraham Lincoln

Posted on: June 1st, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The Jewish population of the United States in 1860 was somewhere between 150,000-200,000. Approximately 3,000 Jews fought on the Confederate side in the Civil War while 7,000 were found on the Union side.

 

Henry S. and Benjamin H. Hartogensis

Posted on: May 2nd, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Usually Jewish history books deal with those who have made their mark by doing extraordinary things. While such people obviously are important, there are those who may not have enjoyed much fame yet whose efforts and accomplishments were crucial to maintaining Yahadus in their community. Two such men are Henry S. Hartogensis and his son, Benjamin H. Hartogensis, who devoted their lives to the Jewish community of Baltimore.

 

The Jews Of Washington During The Civil War

Posted on: April 4th, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Washington, D.C. was created in 1790 as a result of a political compromise. “Washington was a Federal city. It did not have a ‘State’ government. It was under the direct control of Congress for even the simplest of things; schools, streets, courts and land use by private individuals and corporations. Accordingly, Congress dutifully passed on the last day of the first session of the 28th Congress, June 17, 1844, ‘A Bill, concerning conveyances or devices of places of public worship in the District of Columbia.’

Old B'nai Israel Synagogue and Cohen Community House
 

The Early Jewish Settlement Of Texas

Posted on: February 29th, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

In 1519 Alonso Álvarez de Pineda, Spanish explorer and cartographer, led an expedition into Texas with the goal of finding a passage between the Gulf of Mexico and Asia. He and his men were probably the first Europeans to see the land that became known as Texas.

Reverend Arnold Fischel
 

Unsung Hero: Reverend Arnold Fischel

Posted on: February 2nd, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Last month’s column outlined the struggle that took place at the beginning of the Civil War to get Congress to allow the appointment of Jewish army chaplains. Originally only Christian clergymen could serve as chaplains, and it was only as a result of pressure from the American Jewish community that in 1861 Congress passed a new law allowing ordained clergy of other religions to serve as chaplains. The Reverend Arnold (Adolph) Fischel (1830-1894) played a key role in this effort.

 

The Jewish Chaplaincy Controversy

Posted on: January 4th, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

“The American tradition of the military chaplaincy is as old as the United States itself. Clergymen served with the armies of the individual colonies almost from the first battle of the Revolution, and provisions for the payment of chaplains were enacted by the Continental Congress as early as 1775.

 

Jewish Education In America Circa 1870

Posted on: November 30th, 2011

In PrintFrom the Paper

During the nineteenth century a large number of American Jews abandoned traditional religious observance. This led to the United States being dubbed “di treifene medina” (the irreligious land).

 

American Jewry And The 1840 Damascus Blood Libel

Posted on: November 2nd, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Anyone familiar with Jewish history knows of the blood libels that have been used against Jews for centuries.

Glimpses-100711
 

Bilhah Abigail Franks: Early American Jewish Matriarch

Posted on: October 5th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

In general, little is known about Jewish women who resided in America during the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. Two exceptions are Rebecca Machado Phillips[i] and Rebecca Gratz[ii]. Another is Bilhah Abigail (Levy) Franks.

Glimpses-090211
 

The Founding Of Mount Sinai Hospital

Posted on: August 31st, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The Jews of New York City were rather late in establishing Jewish institutions such as poorhouses, homes for orphans and the aged, and hospitals. Several attempts were made in the years prior to 1850, but they failed due to the small size of the New Jewish community, which in 1836 numbered only about 2,000 and increased to about 7,000 in 1840.

Glimpses-080511
 

Sampson Simson, Eccentric Orthodox Philanthropist

Posted on: August 3rd, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Sampson Simson was born on June 30, 1781 in Danbury, Connecticut and died January 7, 1857 in New York. Sampson's father, Solomon Simson, was also American born. Solomon was partners with his brother Sampson Simson, whom we shall refer to as Sampson the elder.

Glimpses-070111
 

Rabbi Abraham Joseph Ash: Strengthening Orthodoxy In Nineteenth-Century America

Posted on: June 29th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Readers of this column are aware that it was not until 1840 that the first ordained Orthodox rabbi, Rabbi Abraham Rice,1 settled in America. Other rabbonim soon began to settle in America. One of them was Rabbi Abraham Joseph Ash.

Glimpses-060311
 

Nineteenth-Century Sabbath Observance

Posted on: June 1st, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The previous two columns discussed kashrus and bris milah observance in America during the 19th century. The trend was that until about 1860 most Jews were careful to observe these mitzvos. However, in the latter part of the century many Jews abandoned keeping kosher both at home and in public. Bris milah, though, was generally observed throughout the entire century.

Glimpses-050611-Bris
 

Nineteenth-Century Bris Milah Observance

Posted on: May 4th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Last month's column dealt with the observance of kashrus by Jews in America during the 19th century. Up until about 1870 German Jewish immigrants went to considerable effort to make sure they could eat kosher meat and poultry. Almost every Jewish community of more than 15 families employed a professional shochet. Smaller communities were served by volunteer shochtim. However, with the spread of the Reform movement in the latter half of the century, Jews began to abandon kashrus.

 

Nineteenth-Century Kashrus Observance

Posted on: March 30th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

During the latter part of 19th century and the first half of the 20th century, many European Jews viewed America as a treife medina (a non-kosher land) from the perspective of traditional Jewish religious observance. It was felt that it was virtually impossible to remain observant in America, and many Jews proved this was indeed the case, as they or their children abandoned much of their religious practices once they arrived in this country.

 

Jews And The Maryland Toleration Act

Posted on: March 2nd, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

In 1629 George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore, applied to King Charles I for a charter to found what was to become the Province of Maryland. Tobacco had proven to be a profitable enterprise in Virginia, and Calvert was hopeful the same would prove true in this new venture. In addition, Calvert, a Catholic, hoped to found a religious haven for his co-religionists who were often persecuted in predominantly Protestant England.

 

The Controversial Mordecai Moses Mordecai

Posted on: February 2nd, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The first ordained rabbi to settle in America, Abraham Rice did not arrive here until 1840. Before then, few men with anything more than a rudimentary Torah knowledge resided in America. One exception was Mordecai Moses Mordecai.

Levine-James-Logan
 

James Logan: Early American Hebrew Scholar

Posted on: January 5th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The story of Hebrew culture in Massachusetts begins with the very foundation of the Plymouth colony, for the first Hebraists to settle in New England came over in the Mayflower. Governor Bradford, one of the Mayflower Pilgrims, was a man whose ability, character, and comparative culture raised him above his fellow settlers. His knowledge of languages is praised by Cotton Mather in the Magnalia:" he was conversant with Dutch, French, Latin, and Greek, but the Hebrew [tongue] he most of all studied, because he said he would see with his own eyes the ancient oracles of God in their native beauty."

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