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November 29, 2015 / 17 Kislev, 5776
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Spiritual Cafe: Jacob Returns to the Promise Land
Dozens Arrested in ISIS Bombing of Tunisian Presidential Guard

November 29, 2015 - 7:08 PM
After Paris Attacks, Europe Showing More Interest in Israeli Security Solutions

November 29, 2015 - 7:05 PM
Israel Hunts for Office Space in Abu Dhabi as New Member of UN Agency

November 29, 2015 - 6:10 PM
Ya’alon Confirms: Russian Pilots Do Breach Israeli Airspace, But Are Not Shot Down

November 29, 2015 - 5:28 PM
Israelis Gear up for ‘GivingTuesday’ in the Jewish State

November 29, 2015 - 3:59 PM
Netanyahu: ‘Not Even One Meter’ of Area C to Palestinian Authority

November 29, 2015 - 2:32 PM
Jews and Arabs Join in ‘Patch Patrol’ Doing Repairs in Homes of the Elderly

November 29, 2015 - 1:59 PM
Israel’s Leviathan Developers Ink Gas Deal With Egypt

November 29, 2015 - 1:12 PM
15 Terror Suspects Captured in Judea, Samaria

November 29, 2015 - 12:24 PM
IDF Shuts Down Another Radio Station in the PA

November 29, 2015 - 10:45 AM
Update: Woman Wounded in Second Jerusalem Stabbing, Suspect Captured [photos]

November 29, 2015 - 10:26 AM
Video: BBC Watch Conference Cites Systemic Anti-Semitism in Coverage of Israel

November 29, 2015 - 10:13 AM
Canadian Synagogue Invites Muslims in after Mosque Firebombed

November 29, 2015 - 10:08 AM
Israeli Death Rates from Most Cancers, Heart Disease, Among Lowest in OECD

November 29, 2015 - 8:28 AM
Update: Terrorist Killed in Jerusalem’s Old City, Policeman Wounded, Children Saved

November 29, 2015 - 8:14 AM
Ex-Adviser to Palestinian Authority says ‘Accept ISIS as Ugly Reality’

November 28, 2015 - 11:00 PM
Shi’ite Muslim Cleric Calls Kerry a ‘Terrorist’

November 28, 2015 - 10:10 PM
An Angry Russia Moves S-400 Antiaircraft Missile Systems into Syria

November 28, 2015 - 9:50 PM
Arabic Writing Found Inside 4 EasyJet Fuel Panels

November 28, 2015 - 9:40 PM
‘Christian State’ Threatens to Kill Muslims in Belgium

November 28, 2015 - 9:27 PM
UAE Insists Israel’s Abu Dhabi Office Plan Does Not Mean Recognition

November 28, 2015 - 9:06 PM
‘Bad Timing’ of Christmas Hurts Chanukah Sales

November 28, 2015 - 9:04 PM
A Misquoted MK Michael Oren Analyzes President Obama

November 28, 2015 - 8:55 PM
Israel Allowing Russia to Fly Over Israeli Skies

November 28, 2015 - 8:48 PM
Terrorists Stab Man in Nahariya, Try to Knife Soldiers in Jordan Valley [video]

November 28, 2015 - 6:55 PM
Paris Massacre Mastermind Planned to Murder French Jews

November 28, 2015 - 6:35 PM
On This Violent ‘Day of Rage,’ a/k/a Friday, Closure Imposed on PA Villages

November 27, 2015 - 9:17 PM
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Glimpses Into American Jewish History
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Posted on: May 2nd, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Usually Jewish history books deal with those who have made their mark by doing extraordinary things. While such people obviously are important, there are those who may not have enjoyed much fame yet whose efforts and accomplishments were crucial to maintaining Yahadus in their community. Two such men are Henry S. Hartogensis and his son, Benjamin H. Hartogensis, who devoted their lives to the Jewish community of Baltimore.

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Posted on: April 4th, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Washington, D.C. was created in 1790 as a result of a political compromise. “Washington was a Federal city. It did not have a ‘State’ government. It was under the direct control of Congress for even the simplest of things; schools, streets, courts and land use by private individuals and corporations. Accordingly, Congress dutifully passed on the last day of the first session of the 28th Congress, June 17, 1844, ‘A Bill, concerning conveyances or devices of places of public worship in the District of Columbia.’

Old B'nai Israel Synagogue and Cohen Community House

Posted on: February 29th, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

In 1519 Alonso Álvarez de Pineda, Spanish explorer and cartographer, led an expedition into Texas with the goal of finding a passage between the Gulf of Mexico and Asia. He and his men were probably the first Europeans to see the land that became known as Texas.

Reverend Arnold Fischel

Posted on: February 2nd, 2012

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Last month’s column outlined the struggle that took place at the beginning of the Civil War to get Congress to allow the appointment of Jewish army chaplains. Originally only Christian clergymen could serve as chaplains, and it was only as a result of pressure from the American Jewish community that in 1861 Congress passed a new law allowing ordained clergy of other religions to serve as chaplains. The Reverend Arnold (Adolph) Fischel (1830-1894) played a key role in this effort.

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Posted on: January 4th, 2012

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“The American tradition of the military chaplaincy is as old as the United States itself. Clergymen served with the armies of the individual colonies almost from the first battle of the Revolution, and provisions for the payment of chaplains were enacted by the Continental Congress as early as 1775.

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Posted on: November 30th, 2011

In PrintFrom the Paper

During the nineteenth century a large number of American Jews abandoned traditional religious observance. This led to the United States being dubbed “di treifene medina” (the irreligious land).

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Posted on: November 2nd, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Anyone familiar with Jewish history knows of the blood libels that have been used against Jews for centuries.


Posted on: October 5th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

In general, little is known about Jewish women who resided in America during the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. Two exceptions are Rebecca Machado Phillips[i] and Rebecca Gratz[ii]. Another is Bilhah Abigail (Levy) Franks.


Posted on: August 31st, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The Jews of New York City were rather late in establishing Jewish institutions such as poorhouses, homes for orphans and the aged, and hospitals. Several attempts were made in the years prior to 1850, but they failed due to the small size of the New Jewish community, which in 1836 numbered only about 2,000 and increased to about 7,000 in 1840.


Posted on: August 3rd, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Sampson Simson was born on June 30, 1781 in Danbury, Connecticut and died January 7, 1857 in New York. Sampson's father, Solomon Simson, was also American born. Solomon was partners with his brother Sampson Simson, whom we shall refer to as Sampson the elder.


Posted on: June 29th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Readers of this column are aware that it was not until 1840 that the first ordained Orthodox rabbi, Rabbi Abraham Rice,1 settled in America. Other rabbonim soon began to settle in America. One of them was Rabbi Abraham Joseph Ash.


Posted on: June 1st, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The previous two columns discussed kashrus and bris milah observance in America during the 19th century. The trend was that until about 1860 most Jews were careful to observe these mitzvos. However, in the latter part of the century many Jews abandoned keeping kosher both at home and in public. Bris milah, though, was generally observed throughout the entire century.


Posted on: May 4th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Last month's column dealt with the observance of kashrus by Jews in America during the 19th century. Up until about 1870 German Jewish immigrants went to considerable effort to make sure they could eat kosher meat and poultry. Almost every Jewish community of more than 15 families employed a professional shochet. Smaller communities were served by volunteer shochtim. However, with the spread of the Reform movement in the latter half of the century, Jews began to abandon kashrus.

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Posted on: March 30th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

During the latter part of 19th century and the first half of the 20th century, many European Jews viewed America as a treife medina (a non-kosher land) from the perspective of traditional Jewish religious observance. It was felt that it was virtually impossible to remain observant in America, and many Jews proved this was indeed the case, as they or their children abandoned much of their religious practices once they arrived in this country.

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Posted on: March 2nd, 2011

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In 1629 George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore, applied to King Charles I for a charter to found what was to become the Province of Maryland. Tobacco had proven to be a profitable enterprise in Virginia, and Calvert was hopeful the same would prove true in this new venture. In addition, Calvert, a Catholic, hoped to found a religious haven for his co-religionists who were often persecuted in predominantly Protestant England.

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Posted on: February 2nd, 2011

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The first ordained rabbi to settle in America, Abraham Rice did not arrive here until 1840. Before then, few men with anything more than a rudimentary Torah knowledge resided in America. One exception was Mordecai Moses Mordecai.


Posted on: January 5th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The story of Hebrew culture in Massachusetts begins with the very foundation of the Plymouth colony, for the first Hebraists to settle in New England came over in the Mayflower. Governor Bradford, one of the Mayflower Pilgrims, was a man whose ability, character, and comparative culture raised him above his fellow settlers. His knowledge of languages is praised by Cotton Mather in the Magnalia:" he was conversant with Dutch, French, Latin, and Greek, but the Hebrew [tongue] he most of all studied, because he said he would see with his own eyes the ancient oracles of God in their native beauty."


Posted on: December 1st, 2010

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The name de Sola appears prominently in the annals of Spanish Jewish history. The de Solas may have settled in Andalusia (in southern Spain) as early as the sixth century.


Posted on: November 3rd, 2010

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Lydia Maria (nee Francis) Child (February 11, 1802-Oct. 20, 1880) was educated at home, at a local "dame school" and at a nearby women's seminary. After her mother died when she was twelve, she went to live with an older sister in Maine for some years. She is little known today, but in her time she was a famous anti-slavery activist. She was also a novelist, editor, journalist and scholar. She is best remembered for her poem "Over the River and Through the Woods," which recalls her Thanksgiving visits as a child to her grandfather's home.

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Posted on: September 28th, 2010

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

There were Jews living during the nineteenth century who made substantial contributions to Yiddishkeit but who, unfortunately, are almost completely forgotten today. Their lives are at most a footnote in standard books dealing with American Jewish history. One such man was Dr. Simeon Abrahams, a pillar of the New York Jewish community during his relatively short life.

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