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Offshore Woes and Southern Discomfort
 
Exclusive: First IDF Cyber-Defense Program Opens at Yeshiva

July 7, 2015 - 9:01 PM
 
Shas MK Begins ‘Three Week’s with ‘Senseless Hate’ against Reform Jews

July 7, 2015 - 7:04 PM
 
NBA Star’s Grassroots Campaign Raises $440,000 to Save Lives in Israel

July 7, 2015 - 6:04 PM
 
IDF to Place Four Elite Combat Units under New Command

July 7, 2015 - 4:25 PM
 
Iran Deal to Miss Fifth Deadline

July 7, 2015 - 3:59 PM
 
Twitter Poll: Voters Prefer an Avocado over Trump in the White House

July 7, 2015 - 3:17 PM
 
Gaza ‘Reconstruction’ Taking Place Underground

July 7, 2015 - 2:45 PM
 
Food Poisoning Kills 45 ISIS Fighters

July 7, 2015 - 2:37 PM
 
Ryanair Flying to Israel with Big Boost to Negev

July 7, 2015 - 2:25 PM
 
Iran’s Rafsanjani Reiterates ‘Israel Will Be Wiped Off The Map’

July 7, 2015 - 2:05 PM
 
170 Hamas Men Arrested in PA Sweep of Judea, Samaria

July 7, 2015 - 12:59 PM
 
Yad Vashem Wins the Oscar for Schindler’s List

July 7, 2015 - 12:33 PM
 
Israeli Eye Surgery Breakthrough Uses Stitch-free Cornea Transplants

July 7, 2015 - 11:43 AM
 
No Entry to Jews on Temple Mount for 10 Days

July 7, 2015 - 10:42 AM
 
Iranian Expert: Khamenei Says No to Signed Deal as Iran Already Getting All it Wants

July 7, 2015 - 4:16 AM
 
Russia Steps Up in U.S.-led Nuclear Talks with Iran

July 6, 2015 - 10:52 PM
 
Agriculture Minister Uri Ariel Cuts Cost of Milk

July 6, 2015 - 10:17 PM
 
New Elite IDF Commando Unit to be Formed

July 6, 2015 - 9:57 PM
 
‘They Did Not Fall in Vain: IDF Struck By Air, Sea & Land’

July 6, 2015 - 9:39 PM
 
Tel Aviv’s Handshake With China, Doing Business with Iran

July 6, 2015 - 7:24 PM
 
F.A.O. Schwarz Closing Flagship July 15 on NYC’s Fifth Avenue

July 6, 2015 - 6:46 PM
 
Shin Bet Foils ISIS Terror Cell in Negev Bedouin Town

July 6, 2015 - 5:39 PM
 
EU Receives Warning ISIS Infiltrating Among Migrants

July 6, 2015 - 4:22 PM
 
President Rivlin Tells Arab Media Ramadan Based on ‘Compassion’

July 6, 2015 - 2:19 PM
 
Rabbi Riskin Delivers Harsh Criticism of Chief Rabbinate

July 6, 2015 - 2:12 PM
 
Obama Trying to Make US Leftist Jews “Mainstream’

July 6, 2015 - 1:34 PM
 
Hamas Returns Cell Phone Service to Gaza

July 6, 2015 - 11:06 AM
 
Iranian-Backed Terrorists Tried to Stage Massive Attack in Jordan

July 6, 2015 - 11:05 AM
 
Police Crack Israel-Palestinian Authority Egg-Smuggling Ring

July 6, 2015 - 10:16 AM
 
Samsung Establishes Development Center in Israel

July 6, 2015 - 9:57 AM
 
Palestinian Authority Arabs Trying to Burn Down Israel

July 6, 2015 - 9:31 AM
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Glimpses Into American Jewish History
 

Posted on: June 30th, 2010

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

In 1749 the Jews of Charleston, South Carolina established their first synagogue, Kahal Kodesh Beis Elokim (KKBE). Last month we examined the events that led some members of KKBE to establish The Reformed Society of Israelites.

 

Posted on: June 2nd, 2010

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Last month we traced the establishment and development of the Jewish Community in Charleston, South Carolina, and its first synagogue, Kahal Kodesh (Holy Congregation) Beth Elokim (KKBE). From its inception in 1749 the synagogue was Orthodox and followed the Sephardic ritual. (This was the case with all of the synagogues founded during colonial times.)

Glimpses-050710
 

Posted on: May 5th, 2010

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The English first settled at Albemarle Point in what is now South Carolina in 1670. In 1680 this settlement was moved to a peninsula between the Ashley and Cooper Rivers, and became Charles Town (named in honor King Charles II). The new location was more healthful than the original settlement, and, since it was behind the islands of a land-locked harbor, provided safety from attack. The name was changed to Charleston at the end of the War of Independence.

 

Posted on: March 29th, 2010

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

There is a stereotype that many may have regarding women of the past - namely, that their place was in the home. But this was not necessarily the case for Jewish women during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Indeed, there were some women during this period who were engaged in a variety of commercial endeavors. Things did begin to change at about the beginning of the nineteenth century, when the attitude that a woman's place is in the home became prevalent.

Glimpses-030510
 

Posted on: March 3rd, 2010

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The January installment of Glimpses Into American Jewish History discussed the early Jewish settlement of Newport, Rhode Island.Even as the Newport Jewish community developed, its numbers were always small, especially compared to Jewish communities today. Indeed, despite growth during the middle part of the 18th century, there were probably never more than 100 Jews residing in Newport.

Glimpses-020510
 

Posted on: February 3rd, 2010

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The Rev. Ezra Stiles was born on November 29, 1727 in Connecticut and graduated from Yale University in 1746. He then studied theology at Yale and was ordained in 1749. After working as a tutor at Yale for a year, he began some mission work among the Indians. In 1752 he was forced to give this up due to ill health. He turned to the study of law and in 1753 took the attorney's oath. He practiced law in New Haven until 1755, whereupon he returned to the ministry, accepting the position of pastor of the Second Congregational Church in Newport, Rhode Island, serving there from 1755 until 1777.

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Posted on: December 30th, 2009

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

In 1636 Roger Williams, after having been banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony for what were considered radical religious views, settled at the tip of Narragansett Bay. He was joined by twelve other settlers at what he named Providence Plantation, due to his belief that God had sustained him and his followers.

Glimpses-110609
 

Posted on: December 2nd, 2009

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Last month we discussed how Rabbi Abraham Joseph Rice came to America in 1840 and became the rav of the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation (Congregation Nidchei Yisroel). Rav Rice was the first ordained Orthodox rabbi to settle in North America.

Glimpses-110609
 

Posted on: November 4th, 2009

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The first Jews arrived in North America in 1654. What is not so well known is that the first qualified rabbi to settle here, Rabbi Abraham Rice, did not arrive until 1840. One might refer to the first 186 years of American Jewish history as the "Reverend and Cantorial Age," since such men, as well as some laymen who possessed better than average Jewish educations, served as the leaders of the various Jewish communities during that period.

Glimpses-100209
 

Posted on: September 30th, 2009

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

In Savannah, Georgia, there is a memorial to the American Revolution called Battlefield Memorial Park. One of the markers there is for Colonel Mordecai Sheftall.

 

Posted on: September 2nd, 2009

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

In two earlier articles we traced the life and rabbinical career of Rabbi Simon Glazer until 1918. Rav Glazer was a rare individual in that he was a secularly educated European trained Orthodox Rov who spoke and wrote English fluently.

 

Posted on: August 5th, 2009

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The first part of the life of Rabbi Simon Joshua Glazer was sketched in last month's Glimpses column. In his youth Rabbi Glazer received a first class Torah education. At the age of 18 he was ordained by Rabbi Alexander Moshe Lapidus, a lifetime friend of Rav Yisroel Salanter. In 1897 Rabbi Glazer immigrated to America where he devoted himself to mastering the English language and acquiring secular knowledge.

 

Posted on: July 1st, 2009

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Virtually all of the rabbonim who came to America during the latter part of the nineteenth century did not speak English. A few did master the language and become proficient at speaking and writing it; one of these was Rabbi Simon Joshua Glazer, who did more than just learn to speak and write in English - he also acquired a substantial secular education.

 

Posted on: June 3rd, 2009

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

In 1927 Captain N. Taylor Phillips1 delivered an address before Congregation Shearith Israel in New York in which he recalled some of the history and traditions of early New York American Jewry. His recollections give fascinating insight into Jewish religious life in America when the community was still in its infancy.

Glimpses-050109
 

Posted on: April 29th, 2009

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Naphtali Moses Taylor Phillips, generally known as N. Taylor Phillips, was a descendent of one of America's first Jewish families. His great-great-great grandfather, Dr. Samuel Nunes (Nunez) Ribeiro and his great-great grandmother, Zipporah were among the first group of Jews to arrive in Savannah, Georgia in 1733. Zipporah married David Mendes Machado, who served as the chazzan of Congregation Shearith Israel in New York from 1737 until his passing in 1747.

Glimpses-040309
 

Posted on: April 1st, 2009

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Naphtali Phillips, the ninth child of Rebecca Machado and Jonas Phillips, was born in New York on October 19, 1773. His great-grandfather was Dr. Samuel Nunes Ribeiro, an escapee from the Portuguese Inquisition1 who became one of the first Jewish settlers of Savannah, GA.2 His maternal grandparents were Zipporah Nunes and David Mendes Machado.3 David Machado also escaped from the Inquisition in Portugal and served for a number of years as the chazzan and Torah teacher of Congregation Shearith Israel in New York.

Glimpses-030609
 

Posted on: March 4th, 2009

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

It was in 1859, according to the Central City Colorado History & Historic Facts website, that "John Gregory discovered 'The Gregory Lode' in a gulch near Central City. Within two weeks, the gold rush was on and within two months the population grew to 10,000 people seeking their fortunes.

Glimpses-020609
 

Posted on: February 4th, 2009

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Last month's Glimpses column, "The Man Who Brought Judah Touro Back To Judaism," discussed how legendary philanthropist Judah Touro's return to religious observance was influenced by Gershom Kursheedt (1817-1863). Kursheedt also convinced Touro to leave considerable sums of money to support many Jewish causes.

Glimpses-010209
 

Posted on: December 31st, 2008

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Last month's column sketched the life of Judah Touro (1775-1854), who became immensely wealthy after his move to New Orleans in 1802, using his fortune to support many causes and individuals.

Glimpses-120508
 

Posted on: December 3rd, 2008

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

"[Judah] Touro's name will always be numbered among the foremost in the annals of American philanthropy. His charities knew neither race nor creed, and his public spirit was no less noteworthy."[i]

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