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Alfred Mordecai’s Agonizing Decision

The Civil War caused a great divide among Americans, pitting brother against brother, relative against relative, friend against friend. Jews fought on both sides in this conflict, and they also found themselves beset with divided loyalties. Alfred Mordecai was one such individual who was forced to make a most difficult decision that cost him his career and alienated him from family and friends..

Columbus Day 1892 And The Jews Of New York

From these headlines it is clear that the 400th anniversary of Columbus discovering the New World was cause for great celebration by New York Jewry.

The Jews Of Martinique And Guadeloupe

"The Jewish history of Martinique and Guadeloupe is relatively short, spanning only about 60 years.

The Jewish Community Of St. Eustatius

The small island of St. Eustatius [in Dutch: Sint Eustatius, and now named simply Statia] is one of the Netherlands Antilles islands, along with St Maarten, Saba, Cura?ao, and Bonaire.

David Mendes And Zipporah Nunes Machado

One of the truly amazing aspects of Jewish history is that there were Jews who secretly maintained as much religious observance as they could while living under the merciless eye of the Inquisition in Spain and Portugal.

Did Haym Salomon Really Finance The American Revolution?

One of the most fascinating figures in American Jewish history is Haym Salomon (1740-1785).

The Jews Of Nevis And Alexander Hamilton

The sister islands of the Federation of St. Kitts and Nevis lie about 225 miles southeast of Puerto Rico in the Leeward Islands in the Eastern Caribbean. Nevis, the smaller of the two islands, is elliptically shaped and has a land area of approximately five by seven miles. When Christopher Columbus spotted this eight-mile-long island on his second voyage to the New World in 1493, he mistook its cloud-shrouded mountains for icy peaks and named it Nuestra Se?ora de las Nieves (Our Lady of the Snows).

The Beginnings Of Jewish Education In New York

"Jewish communities from time immemorial have recognized educational institutions as the bedrock of Jewish continuity.

The Gomez Family

The Gomez family was one the foremost Jewish families in New York during colonial times.

Louis Raskas Of St. Louis

In the late 1800's and early 1900's America was called the treifa medina by many religious Jews living in Eastern Europe.

The Inquisition In Mexico

For centuries Mexico was inhabited by a number of different Indian races.

Rebecca Gratz: Champion Of The Unfortunate

In the 18th and 19th centuries, the lives of most women were centered on family matters. Rebecca Gratz took a very different course. She never married, but instead "devoted her adult life to providing relief for Philadelphia's underprivileged women and children and securing religious, moral and material sustenance for all of Philadelphia's Jews.

Early Caribbean Jewish Communities (Part I)

Places like Barbados, Curacao, Jamaica, Tobago, the Lesser Antilles, and St. Eustatia probably conjure up, in the minds of many Jewish Press readers, visions of vacation resorts.

Jacob Mordecai: Pioneer In Women’s Education

There was a time when it was thought unnecessary to give women an academic education equal to the one given to men.

A Jewish Wedding In 1787

Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813), a physician and a signer of the Declaration of Independence, "was the most striking, the most impressive, and the most controversial figure in North American medicine of his day. Brilliant and well educated, he was a restless soul, impatient and impulsive, quick to make decisions and to defend them against all disagreement.

The Jewish Community Of Surinam

The discovery of the Western Hemisphere opened new opportunities for Jews.

Harry Fischel: Orthodox Jewish Philanthropist Par Excellence (Part II)

Mr. Fischel had a longstanding relationship with the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS), which was destined to have its name transferred to the rabbinical school affiliated with Yeshiva University.

Harry Fischel: Orthodox Jewish Philanthropist Par Excellence (Part I)

The front-page essay "The Multimillionaire Who Remained True to Orthodoxy" (Jewish Press, April 28) dealt with the early life of Harry Fischel.

Rebecca (Machado) Phillips: Colonial Jewish Matriarch

Little has been written about the lives of Jewish women during colonial times. In general, historians have focused on the lives of men who were noteworthy during that era, primarily because more information is available about men who were publicly active than women who, more often than not, devoted the majority of their efforts to the home scene.

A Haven For Jews In New York (Part II): The Founding Of Ararat

The previous installment of Glimpses into American Jewish History (Jewish Press, Feb. 3) dealt with the life of Mordechai Manuel Noah (1785-1851). Noah, a man with an unbelievable breadth of interests and activities, was, for many years, considered theleader of the New York Jewish community.

A Haven for Jews in New York (Part I)

In 1825, more than 70 years before the First Zionist Congress was held in Basel, Switzerland, Mordechai Manuel Noah startled the world by proposing a concrete plan for the establishment of a Jewish city of refuge in North America.

The Jewish Settlement of Savannah, Georgia

London, in the late 1720's was overflowing with peoples of many origins.

Escape From The Inquisition

"In 1478 at the request of the Spanish sovereigns Ferdinand and Isabella, Pope Sixtus IV (1471-84) issued a papal bull allowing for the creation of the Spanish Inquisition.

Bris Mila During Colonial Times

Since the time of Avraham Aveinu, Jews have observed the mitzva of having their sons circumcised on the eighth day after birth.

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Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/glimpses-ajh/alfred-mordecais-agonizing-decision/2007/10/31/

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