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November 30, 2015 / 18 Kislev, 5776
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The Wheel of Change


Dear Readers:

The Torah revolves around one simple concept – treating others in the way you would want to be treated. The following poem gives a glimpse as to why.

The Wheel of Change

I saw you standing at the check-out line,
Your cart seemed empty compared to mine.

You came in after me, but were quickly done,
Not many groceries are needed
When you shop for one.

I saw you walking alone from shul.
You smiled wistfully at my little girl.

I rushed past you, as usual, in a hurry,
Afraid my Shabbos guests would arrive early.

I heard you davening on Rosh Hashanah,
Your voice trembled softly
As you davened withkavanah,
I meant to approach you,
And wish you a good year,
But distracted by friends,
I didn’t come near.

We never got to speak, you and I,
I never made the effort – and you were too shy.

I saw you quite often; I knew you were there,
But I was too self-absorbed to truly care.

The days turned into seasons,
The seasons into years,
Bringing moments of great happiness,
And others full of tears,
Life is like a wheel –
What is up can go down,
Mazel can smile upon you,
And just as easily frown.

I no longer have a husband,
I’m on my own,
My children are away.
I’m all alone.

You too, had changes
To the status quo in your life.
You’re no longer single,
You’re a mother and a wife.

And as I walk alone from shul,
To a solitary meal,
I finally understand,
How you used to feel.

Please don’t follow my bad example,
Don’t take a cue from me,
To look at those around you,
But not bother to see.

I was smug and self-centered,
Arrogance led to my apathy,
The shoe is now on the other foot,
Please be moichel me.

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Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/on-our-own/the-wheel-of-change-2/2011/06/22/

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