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November 27, 2014 / 5 Kislev, 5775
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Should All Israeli Jews Be Permitted to Carry Guns?
 
Israelis Donate Masses of Hair to Cancer Patients

November 27, 2014 - 3:32 AM
 
Israel’s 2014 Cruise Ship Tourist Numbers Affected By… Operation Pillar of Defense

November 26, 2014 - 11:45 PM
 
Heart Surgery for US Supreme Ct Justice Ginsburg

November 26, 2014 - 11:36 PM
 
Shas: For 0% VAT on Basic Goods, We’ll Join Coalition

November 26, 2014 - 9:10 PM
 
Arab Charged with 3 Arson Attempts at Hadassah Hospital, Where He Worked

November 26, 2014 - 8:37 PM
 
The Hidden Reason the United States Won’t Release Pollard.

November 26, 2014 - 5:30 PM
 
Wife of Har Nof Terrorist to Lose Residency and Financial Privileges

November 26, 2014 - 4:02 PM
 
IDF to Stop Persecution of Observant Soldiers With Beards

November 26, 2014 - 2:41 PM
 
Likud Proposes Multipoint Plan to Fight Arab Terrorism in Israel

November 26, 2014 - 12:20 PM
 
Kinneret Rises 3.5 Centimeters in Overnight Rain

November 26, 2014 - 11:28 AM
 
Swiss Philanthropists Rewarding Citizens Who Stop Terror Attacks

November 26, 2014 - 11:21 AM
 
Released for Publication: Netanel Arami Murdered in Terror Attack

November 26, 2014 - 11:13 AM
 
Egged Bus Hits 3 Arabs, 1 Dead

November 26, 2014 - 10:59 AM
 
Fake Bomb Planted Near Shavei Shomron

November 26, 2014 - 10:28 AM
 
ISIS ‘Prince’ of Iraq’s Anbar Province Killed

November 26, 2014 - 10:02 AM
 
Ferguson Fuels Unrest in America But Israel is Blamed

November 26, 2014 - 9:12 AM
 
MK Yuli Edelstein Tells Chabad Rabbis Why He ‘Lost It’ Over Tefillin

November 26, 2014 - 7:15 AM
 
Turkish Legislator Pens Bill Naming Israel Terrorist State

November 26, 2014 - 7:09 AM
 
ISIS Stones to Death Two Gay Men

November 26, 2014 - 6:20 AM
 
Israel’s Recognition of Aramean Nationality Empowers Arameans Worldwide In Demand For Rights

November 26, 2014 - 5:48 AM
 
Pro-Hezbollah Singer Arrested for Incitement in Lebanon

November 26, 2014 - 1:30 AM
 
Thousands at Memorial for Jerusalem’s Har Nof Massacre Victims

November 26, 2014 - 12:39 AM
 
European Parliament Puts Off ‘Palestine’ Vote – For now

November 26, 2014 - 12:11 AM
 
Pro-ISIS Group Says ‘Use Ferguson Flames to Fuel Terror in America’

November 25, 2014 - 11:26 PM
 
Police Confirm: Old City Attack was Planned Ambush

November 25, 2014 - 9:16 PM
 
Additional Security for MK Tzipi Hotovely

November 25, 2014 - 8:33 PM
 
Work Accident or Mistaken Identity? Arab Car Destroyed by Firebomb, 3 Injured

November 25, 2014 - 8:13 PM
 
Major Rainstorm to Hit Israel

November 25, 2014 - 7:13 PM
 
Eichmann Trial Documents Found in Trash to be Auctioned

November 25, 2014 - 6:22 PM
 
And the Only US State Without a Chabad Is…

November 25, 2014 - 6:18 PM
 
Palestinian Authority TV Blames ‘Occupation’ for Killing Har Nof ‘Martyrs’ [video]

November 25, 2014 - 6:10 PM
 
Dutch Say No to “Palestine”

November 25, 2014 - 6:04 PM
 
Police Chief: Think of 1 Billion Muslims and Don’t Pray on Temple Mount

November 25, 2014 - 5:32 PM
 
Netanyahu Wants to Discriminate against Terrorists

November 25, 2014 - 2:31 PM
 
President Rivlin Bans Performance of Singer because of Anti-Arab Song

November 25, 2014 - 1:38 PM
 
Feiglin Bans Arab MK from Podium for Calling Him ‘Fascist’

November 25, 2014 - 12:57 PM
 
Police Arrest Suspected Stabber in Old City [video]

November 25, 2014 - 10:20 AM
 
Israeli Ambassador Complains About Jordan’s Official Antisemitism

November 25, 2014 - 9:35 AM
Sponsored Post
IDC Herzliya Campus A Day on Campus

To mark IDC Herzliya’s 20th anniversary, we spent a day following Prof. Uriel Reichman, IDC’s founder and president, and Jonathan Davis, VP for External Relations, around its delightful campus.



Magazine
Glimpses-070111
 

Posted on: June 29th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Readers of this column are aware that it was not until 1840 that the first ordained Orthodox rabbi, Rabbi Abraham Rice,1 settled in America. Other rabbonim soon began to settle in America. One of them was Rabbi Abraham Joseph Ash.

Kupfer-Cheryl
 

Posted on: June 22nd, 2011

SectionsMagazineOn Our Own/Cheryl Kupfer

Dear Readers: The Torah revolves around one simple concept - treating others in the way you would want to be treated. The following poem gives a glimpse as to why.

 

Posted on: June 15th, 2011

SectionsMagazine

This article was originally published May 13, 1960

Kupfer-Cheryl
 

Posted on: June 7th, 2011

SectionsMagazineOn Our Own/Cheryl Kupfer

I have never used my column to eulogize friends who have passed away, as their loss affected me and an inner circle of people who knew them - but not necessarily the community at large. But that is not the case for Shimie Silver, a"h, for without exaggerating, his circle of friends numbered in the thousands and transcended borders.

 

Posted on: June 1st, 2011

SectionsMagazineNews

The New York Yankees and their fans observe April 27 as Babe Ruth Day to remember the home run slugger's exploits on the baseball diamond. Jewish New Yorkers, however, this year marked the day by remembering another side of Ruth - his little-known efforts to aid African-Americans and other minorities, including Jews in Europe during the Holocaust.

Glimpses-060311
 

Posted on: June 1st, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

The previous two columns discussed kashrus and bris milah observance in America during the 19th century. The trend was that until about 1860 most Jews were careful to observe these mitzvos. However, in the latter part of the century many Jews abandoned keeping kosher both at home and in public. Bris milah, though, was generally observed throughout the entire century.

Kupfer-Cheryl
 

Posted on: May 25th, 2011

SectionsMagazineOn Our Own/Cheryl Kupfer

Thousands of young frum men and women in their late teens and early 20s will soon be returning from a year (or two or three) in Israeli yeshivas and seminaries, full of youthful exuberance and idealism. Many who had planned on going to college have changed their minds (often to the dismay of their parents) insisting that secular studies or employment are not for them. They want to be full time learners or the wife of one.

 

Posted on: May 25th, 2011

InDepthInterviews and Profiles

Rabbi Dr. Aaron Levine, z"l, passed away on the first day of Pesach, one day before his 65th birthday. He was an erudite scholar who had received semicha from the Rabbi Jacob Joseph Theological Seminary and a PhD in economics from New York University. He was equally at home in the world of Torah and in the secular world, and thus a unique combination of Torah and chochmah, something that is increasingly rare today. Furthermore, this intellectual prowess was clothed in a mantel of extreme humility.

Kupfer-Cheryl
 

Posted on: May 11th, 2011

SectionsMagazineOn Our Own/Cheryl Kupfer

In my last column, I wrote about the head-scratching phenomenon of fine young men and women in their late 20's and early 30's who were as marriageable as their friends and siblings, but were still single. I wrote the article because it seemed that over Pesach, every person I met - whether a local or a visitor - representing the full spectrum of Orthodoxy, wondered if I "knew someone" for a single son or daughter, a niece of nephew or a family friend who was still in the parsha despite the fact they were so eligible and "normal."

Glimpses-050611-Bris
 

Posted on: May 4th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

Last month's column dealt with the observance of kashrus by Jews in America during the 19th century. Up until about 1870 German Jewish immigrants went to considerable effort to make sure they could eat kosher meat and poultry. Almost every Jewish community of more than 15 families employed a professional shochet. Smaller communities were served by volunteer shochtim. However, with the spread of the Reform movement in the latter half of the century, Jews began to abandon kashrus.

Kupfer-Cheryl
 

Posted on: April 28th, 2011

SectionsMagazineOn Our Own/Cheryl Kupfer

Out of all the Jewish holidays, Pesach is the one that brings far-flung family and friends together. You go to shul, for a walk, shopping or to an amusement park during chol hamoed, and to your delight you bump into friends and acquaintances you haven't seen for ages. You sit down and you shmooze and you catch up with each other's lives and share information about people you both knew from "the old days."

 

Posted on: April 21st, 2011

SectionsFeaturesFeatures On The Jewish World

In Hong Kong, there are certainly some inconveniences involved in finding every last product necessary to recreate the Pesach we had in New York. But, we have found it is merely a matter of mastering logistics and advance planning. Sometimes it involves finding shlepers coming in from the States willing to take a few bulky boxes of tasteless Crispy O’s and Streits Brownie Mix in an extra suitcase. This is all part of the Hong Kong festival ritual.

Kupfer-Cheryl
 

Posted on: April 13th, 2011

SectionsMagazineOn Our Own/Cheryl Kupfer

Were you to play a game of word association, Pesach would immediately be connected with "cleaning "and "company" (and possibly, potatoes.) Pesach is the one holiday that magnet-like, pulls families together.

Kupfer-Cheryl
 

Posted on: March 30th, 2011

SectionsMagazineOn Our Own/Cheryl Kupfer

Although most of us are now focused on Pesach and rolling up our sleeves - both physically and mentally - we need to keep close to our hearts a wrenching message that was brought to the fore this particular Purim. For me and many other Jews, Purim was not "business as usual" in terms of having great fun, merrymaking and partying. Our joy was deeply tempered by the haunting images of the murdered Fogel family - a young mother, father, and three of their six children, including a three-month old infant girl - who were ruthlessly slaughtered as they slept, by Palestinian descendants of Amalek.

 

Posted on: March 30th, 2011

SectionsMagazine

Originally published in The Jewish Press, January 29, 1960

 

Posted on: March 30th, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

During the latter part of 19th century and the first half of the 20th century, many European Jews viewed America as a treife medina (a non-kosher land) from the perspective of traditional Jewish religious observance. It was felt that it was virtually impossible to remain observant in America, and many Jews proved this was indeed the case, as they or their children abandoned much of their religious practices once they arrived in this country.

 

Posted on: March 23rd, 2011

SectionsMagazineNews

Sarah Palin, the former Alaska governor, 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee and possible 2012 presidential candidate, visited Israel earlier this week.

Kupfer-Cheryl
 

Posted on: March 16th, 2011

SectionsMagazineOn Our Own/Cheryl Kupfer

"Another day another dinar," sighed Esther as she prepared her daily infusion of Turkish coffee before leaving for her job as an assistant editor at her Uncle Mordy's business, Megillah Publishing. As usual, she turned to the classified/singles section of her favorite newspaper, The Persian Press, the largest independent Anglo-Persian weekly in the world - distributed in all 127 provinces. "Sounds interesting," she thought to herself as she glanced at an ad announcing a singles shabbaton taking place in the much buzzed about B'nai Benyamin shul that recently opened (at the cost of a million dinar) in the suburban sand dunes outside of the city. There would be tent hospitality for the guests since there was no hotel in the vicinity.

 

Posted on: March 16th, 2011

SectionsMagazinePotpourri

Sixty-five years is a long time. Indeed, it was not until about 1947 that a person born in that year could expect to live to at least age 65. So when one encounters a couple who have been married for sixty-five years, it is certainly worth noting.

 

Posted on: March 2nd, 2011

SectionsMagazineGlimpses Into American Jewish History

In 1629 George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore, applied to King Charles I for a charter to found what was to become the Province of Maryland. Tobacco had proven to be a profitable enterprise in Virginia, and Calvert was hopeful the same would prove true in this new venture. In addition, Calvert, a Catholic, hoped to found a religious haven for his co-religionists who were often persecuted in predominantly Protestant England.

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