web analytics
July 26, 2014 / 28 Tammuz, 5774
Israel at War: Operation Protective Edge
 
 
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post
IDC Advocacy Room IDC Fights War on Another Front

Student Union opens ‘hasbara’ room in effort to fill public diplomacy vacuum.



Back To School: Administrators Return To The Classroom To Learn Management Skills


            Educational degrees in both teaching and administration abound. But when it comes to managing schools, few universities offer courses devoted to helping school principals and other administrators learn the management skills necessary to successfully run a school – specifically, a Jewish school.

 

With that in mind, in July 2007 the UJA-Federation launched the Institute for Day School Management, a program run in collaboration with the Columbia University Graduate School of Business and the Communal Jewish Education Task Force. The Institute trains yeshiva and day school principals, and educational directors from the New York metropolitan area, to think strategically about their schools’ futures and to implement change to improve their education and administration. The free program takes place every two years, and is currently in its second cycle; classes will end this March.

 

Rabbi Elimelech Gottlieb, an early recruit to be the program’s director, said it was more than time that this type of course arrived on the Jewish educational scene. “Management training should be at the core of any training for people in leadership roles,” he explained. “The New York City public school system began training principals and school administrators several years ago, and in the business world, regular management training takes place for those at the highest levels of professional leadership. As the Jewish world has grown exponentially and gotten only more complex, it is vital to invest resources in this type of training for Jewish yeshivas and day schools.”

 

Limited to 24 participants per cycle, the courses are spread out over nearly 20 days and, along with two overnight retreats, are divided up throughout the year.

 

Courses take place at Columbia and UJA-Federation of New York, and are taught by Columbia professors. The courses include, among others, Strategic Management, Financial Management, Marketing and Public Relations, and Resource Development. Financial policies are discussed to maximize an efficient use of resources. And case studies of organizations facing and overcoming challenges are analyzed.

 

A key component of the Institute entails each school administrator proposing a strategic plan tailored for his or her school, incorporating ideas from the different classes into that design. Participants can expect to have “homework” throughout the year, such as readings and assignments leading up to the creation and implementation of the strategic plan.

 

Rabbi Gottlieb works tirelessly throughout the year marketing the program and recruiting potential candidates. He also tracks the program’s progress, and maintains follow-up contact with each administrator. He even visits schools twice a year to offer one-on-one coaching and mentoring to the Institute’s graduates. Those graduates earn a certificate in not-for-profit management from Columbia University and the UJA-Federation – but more important, they gain knowledge that will equip them to effectively run and manage their schools.

 

Rabbi Shlomo Stochel, assistant dean of Ramaz Upper School and a member of the current participating class, said, “Since the program began, I am much more reflective of my own leadership style and the impact it has upon others, and I have acquired a profound appreciation for the indispensability of moving from bureaucratic management to visionary and strategic leadership.”

 

And Rabbi Kenneth Fogel, the principal of Hebrew Academy of Nassau County, said, “I have gained a truly insightful understanding of the social styles and needs of both myself and those around me.  In this way, I have increased my effectiveness with my colleagues, parents, students and lay leaders.”

 

Other schools that have already sent administrators to participate in the program include Rabbi Arthur Schneier Park East Day School in Manhattan, Yeshiva Derech HaTorah High School and Yeshiva of Manhattan Beach of Brooklyn, Solomon Schechter of Nassau, and North Shore Hebrew Academy Middle School on Long Island. “Each principal has to study the environment of his school and the environment it’s in, which changes constantly,” declared Rabbi Gottlieb.

 

“We’ve seen a lot of positive change among the schools that participated in the Institute, Rabbi Gottlieb said. “The schools have successfully implemented strategic planning, bringing all the school leaders together to understand the school’s mission. When both lay and professional leadership are aligned in terms of the vision for the school, it is much easier to fulfill that vision and work together to carry it out.”

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Back To School: Administrators Return To The Classroom To Learn Management Skills”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
John Kerry
Entire Israeli Cabinet Rejects Kerry’s Proposed Ceasefire, Talks Continue
Latest Sections Stories
Respler-072514

The real solution to bullying is to empower the bullied child.

Schonfeld-logo1

Time outs increases compliance and positive behavior far more than other forms of discipline

Schild-Edwin

Interestingly, sometimes people who have a very high self-awareness may experience intense reactions to circumstances that others might respond to more mildly.

“You Touro graduates are automatically soldiers in [Israel’s] struggle, and we count on you,” Rothstein told the graduates.

The lemonana was something else. Never had we seen a green drink look so enticing.

On his marriage, he wrote: “This is what I believe: something of the core, of the essence of this meaningful and life-affirming Judaism will not be absent from our home” (1882).

With the recent kidnapping by the Hamas and the barbaric murder of three children – Gilad Shaar, Eyal Yifrach and Naftali Frankel, we believe that the best answer to honor the memory of those murdered is to continue building those very communities – large and small – that our enemies are trying to destroy.

Written entirely through Frayda’s eyes, the reader is drawn by her unassuming personality.

Adopting an ancient exegetical approach that is based on midrashic readings of the text, thematic connections that span between various books of the Bible are revealed.

While Lipman comes from an ultra-Orthodox background and is an Orthodox rabbi, he offers a breath of fresh air when he suggests that “polarization caused by extremism and isolationism in the religious community may be the greatest internal threat to the future of the Jewish people”

The Joys of Yiddish, Leo Rosten defines a mentch as “someone to admire and emulate, someone of noble character.”

Certainly today’s communication via e-mail, Facebook, Twitter and the like, including the ubiquitous Whatsapp, has reduced the need to talk with people and communicate at length.

More Articles from Tova Ross
Idan Zablocki

Amanda and Akiva Zablocki, Jewish parents on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, are spending the month of Elul on the phone battling insurance companies. Their one-year old son, Idan (“era” in Hebrew), will soon be undergoing a bone marrow transplant for Hyper IgM, a rare genetic immune deficiency disorder that affects only two in a million people. The family’s Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Sukkot will take place at the Seattle Children’s Hospital as they prepare Idan for the surgery.

Earlier this year, the American Cancer Society came out with new guidelines concerning Pap smears, which screen for cervical cancer. Conventional wisdom had long held that women should receive annual Pap smears, but in March, doctors announced the new guidelines suggesting that women receive a Pap smear once every three years.

In his lifetime, he was a positive influence on so many, always inspiring others to be better while at the same time, working on his own character.

Gift-giving has become increasingly popular on the eve of Rosh Hashanah and the lead item is honey, not only those ubiquitous cute honey bear bottles, but more sophisticated and gourmet options.

Gift-giving has become increasingly popular on the eve of Rosh Hashanah and the lead item is honey, not only those ubiquitous cute honey bear bottles, but more sophisticated and gourmet options.

It is a testament to the authenticity and devotion of the staff at Our Place – a group of drop-in centers in Flatbush that cater to what most people would simply term “at-risk” teens – that none of them wanted to be mentioned by name in this article. In fact, the majority of them were even cautious about speaking with a reporter, so protective are they of their children, whom they consider very nearly their own.

Educational degrees in both teaching and administration abound. But when it comes to managing schools, few universities offer courses devoted to helping school principals and other administrators learn the management skills necessary to successfully run a school – specifically, a Jewish school.

When one thinks of kapotes, the traditional long suit jackets worn by married Lubavitcher chassidim, one doesn’t automatically think of the cutting edge of fashion. Yet Mendy Sacho, a 25-year-old Lubavitch tailor in Toronto, Canada, is pushing the garb into the spotlight.

    Latest Poll

    Do you think the FAA ban on US flights to Israel is political?






    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/potpourri/back-to-school-administrators-return-to-the-classroom-to-learn-management-skills/2010/01/13/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: