web analytics
March 6, 2015 / 15 Adar , 5775
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post


Once Upon A Washer

Eller-120613

In the olden days, when you bought an appliance, it lasted forever.

The hideous Caloric oven that came with my house was forty years old when it finally baked its last challah and went up to that big scrap heap in the sky.  My twenty-year-old refrigerator, while not the most energy efficient model, was working just fine when we redid our kitchen and replaced it with a newer model. My old washer and dryer weren’t particularly glamorous looking when we replaced them during the aforementioned home renovation, but you know what?  They did their jobs and never once gave me any aggravation.

Okay, maybe I’m waxing a little nostalgic.  The older appliances didn’t last forever.  But they certainly had a life expectancy that was longer than that of the average firefly, which is more than I can say for today’s models.  Call me crazy, but I want appliances that are reliable.  I don’t want my oven to tell me what time it is and I don’t need to know the precise temperature inside my refrigerator.  I promise you I am a huge fan of computers, but not inside my appliances where they break on a regular basis and drive up the cost of repairs a zillion-fold.

Is anyone else alarmed by the way extended warranties are sold on just about anything and everything? It means one of two things – either someone has found a great way of getting consumers to part with more of their hard earned dollars or manufacturers have no faith in their own products.  Neither of those options is particularly heartwarming.

Presumably we have all done our homework when we buy major home appliances and I can tell you that when we recently replaced most of ours at Chez Eller we were confident that with carefully chosen, all new appliances, it would be a long time until we next spent quality time with our favorite repairman.

Yeah, right.

Our refrigerator broke a few months after we installed it.  And that was just the first time.

Given that we were still covered under the manufacturer’s warranty, that repair didn’t cost us anything, although the repairman did manage to leave behind a calling card that we would rather not have had – a gouge mark in one of our new kitchen cabinets.  Six weeks later, it died again and this time we insisted on a different service person to fix the problem.  Not only didn’t this one damage our house, but unlike the first one, he actually fixed the problem.

It was several months later when the icemaker died and two years until we started having dishwasher problems.  Remember how for years we were told not to rinse the dishes before putting them in the dishwasher?  Apparently that advice is now passé since newer dishwashers no longer have food choppers.  What is the point in having a dishwasher if I have to remove any particles that won’t fit through the mesh screen buried deep inside my dishwasher?

But worse yet was our washing machine.  Highly recommended by a local retailer, just one year later, the same saleslady warned my daughter away from that model. From day one, the washer sounded like an airplane taking off in my house but after almost three years it took on a new persona – that of a monster crunching loudly on gravel and clocking in on my decibel meter app at almost 100 decibels.  My friendly repairman broke the news to me gently:  the machine was notoriously unreliable, structurally defective, about to break and not worth fixing.

Call me crazy.  But having to replace both a two and a half year old washing machine and its matching pedestal was just not okay.  Despite warnings that it was a lost cause, I called Whirlpool, determined to rattle some cages until someone agreed to fix my washer.

About the Author: Sandy Eller is a freelance writer who writes for numerous websites, newspapers, magazines and many private clients. She can be contacted at sandyeller1@gmail.com.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

One Response to “Once Upon A Washer”

  1. You just had some bad luck and bought a bad appliance. Most will last ten years, but if you're one of the people who gets the one that dies the next year, you'll wish you bought the warranty that most people feel is a waste of money (when nothing dies within the coverage period). You're definitely right about all the tech and other devices that get attached to appliances and other things. The fridge doesn't need an internet connection. Cars don't need all these electrical motors to operate every simple thing our hands could do just as easily and quickly. There is a market for appliances and vehicles that have as few breakable components as possible, but we keep marching down this path where once one of the unnecessary components breaks, the entire machine stops functioning…or forces the cost of production and the pricetag to go up. And what's the deal with all the toys that require batteries? Are kids too lazy to pull a string these days? We've got to put batteries in everything, making everything useless once the batteries are dead….maybe that's the goal. Corporations, in their drive to increase sales, have utilized planned obsolescence in ways that are harmful to the consumer and the future. They all say they promote green practices, but we know the truth….they produce things in ways and encourage lifestyles that fill landfills with plastic trash and worn-out batteries. And I agree that you shouldn't have to do the dishes before loading the dishwasher. Whatever happened to "keeping it simple"?

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif.
Iran’s Zarif Paints Iran as a Lamb, Israel as the Lion
Latest Sections Stories
Glimpses-logo-NEW

The ship’s captain apparently respected the Friedenwalds’ strict adherence to halacha because he allowed them to use his cabin for davening and other religious observances.

Yarden Merlot

Bottles of wine accompany the Pesach storytelling – each glass of wine represents the four expressions used by G-d in describing the redemption of the Jewish people from Egypt.

Schonfeld-logo1

There is a point that many parenting books miss: children do more for us than we do for them.

Brigitte was a nine-year-old girl when Islamic militants launched an assault on a Lebanese military base and destroyed her home.

The husband needs to make some changes!

Purim is a fantastic time for fantasies, so I hope you won’t mind my fantasizing about how easy life would be if kids would prefer healthy cuisine over sweets. Imagine waking up to the call of “Mommy, when will my oatmeal be ready?”… As you rush to ladle out the hot unsweetened cereal, you rub […]

‘Double Gold’ awarded to 2012 Yarden Heights wine & 2011 Yarden Merlot Kela Single Vineyard.

One should not give the money before Purim morning or after sunset.

The mishloach manos of times gone by were sometimes simple and sometimes elaborate, but the main focus was on the preparation of the delicious food they contained.

One of the earliest special Purims we have on record was celebrated by the Jews of Granada and Shmuel HaNagid, the eleventh-century rav, poet, soldier and statesman, and one of the most influential Jews in Muslim Spain.

Jews, wake up! Stop educating the world and start educating yourselves.

The lessons conform to the sensitivities and needs of the Orthodox community…

The program took on special significance as it marked not only the first anniversary of Rebbetzin Kudan’s levayah but also the 27th yahrzeit of Rebbetzin Chaya Mushka Schneerson, a”h.

More Articles from Sandy Eller
Food-Talk---Eller-logo

There is a lot of creativity in the food blogging community and not only in the kitchen.

A-Night-Out-logo

One of the best perks of writing about restaurants is that we often have the opportunity to taste a broad sampling of menu items and the chef at Brasserie Halevi kept up a steady stream of food to our table.

If you have ever tried to organize the different sized roller blades in your garage, you will appreciate the wisdom of the roller skates we had when we were little.

His entire existence was about spreading simcha and glorifying G-d’s name on a daily basis.

As always, when it comes to electronics, you get what you pay for.

“The secret to a good donut is using quality ingredients and the ability to be patient and give them time to proof.”

“We had been in our first-period class for less than three minutes, and the website was already in-motion,” Rabbi Young told The Jewish Press.

It may be sweater weather now, but sooner or later summer will be here, bringing abundant sunshine, swimming, barbeques and mosquitoes.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/potpourri/once-upon-a-washer/2013/12/06/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: