web analytics
August 29, 2015 / 14 Elul, 5775
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post


Shidduch Sadness (Part II)

        In my previous column I wrote about older singles who were undermining their chance at getting married by letting others make decisions for them on as to whether to date a proposed shidduch or not. In the two cases I cited, one let a mentor and the other, her mother, do the thinking for her. Both nixed the match. The mother was affronted that a divorced father of one had been suggested for her 39-year-old daughter and the other vetoed the date because, “she just didn’t see it.” The girls obediently complied and did not go out.

 

         What the harm would have been with these “girls” investing a couple of hours of their life to meet the guy, I don’t know – but in not meeting, the harm was potentially enormous. While I don’t know the status of the girl in the first case, I do know that the second woman is still single, in her 50’s and statistically unlikely to have a family of her own.

 

         I am not saying that either shidduch would have worked – but they’ll never know and I suspect there were many other “don’t go out” scenarios over the years, very possibly -missed opportunities.

 

         This dead-end behavior brings to mind a joke I once heard. Anehrlich but poor man, up to his ears in debt, would cry to Hashem every time the winner of a big lottery was announced, asking why he couldn’t be a winner. Week after week there would be a lottery, and this unfortunate man would wail to Shomayim, bemoaning his cruel fate and bad luck, wondering what would be the big deal if he won even a small amount of money. Finally, after a particularly bitter rant, the man heard a Heavenly voice. “Rev Yid, the voice called out – I hear your pleas and they have moved Me but you have to buy a ticket!

 

         People, especially, long time singles, should take heed of Hillel’s statement – “If I am not for myself, who will be.” It’s certainly acceptable, even commendable to ask those close to you for an opinion and input before you accept a date – but at the end of the day – it should be your decision, because it’s your life and your married friend/parent/mentor will not be affected by your decision, but yours very likely will be by theirs – whether they insist you pass on this date – or the opposite – whether they push you to accept when your gut feeling tells you not to.

 

         Why are some people afraid to take responsibility for their lives? My guess – and it is purely speculation on my part since I am not a therapist – is that they don’t have self confidence – a very necessary component in taking risks. A tragic sense of inadequacy makes them hesitant to move forward on their own – much like a pre-nursery student on his first day of school who will not step into the classroom by himself – insisting his mother come in with him.

 

         I truly believe that people who have managed to avoid getting married and are older, (but have no obvious reason for not finding a mate, such as a serious physical or mental handicap, chronic unemployment, criminal background, very poor hygiene – to name a few) need to go on a journey of self-discovery to see what is holding them back. What is it that makes women turn away fine suitors, and men turn away women who have all the qualities of an aishet chayil?

 

         On a conscious level, they truly want to move forward and build a bayit ne’eman and they make the effort by going to singles Shabbatonim, signing up for on-line dating services, etc. but very likely on a sub-conscious level, they have built a wall whose foundation is fear and a negative self-perception. It is crucial to become aware of this self-imposed barrier, for only then can the individual be helped to find the tools to break it down. There can be any number of reasons for fearing marriage – a fear of failure, a fear of being “found” out that they are not the “great” person people think they are, a fear of being boxed in, of being controlled. They need to know where this fear is coming from and be helped in dissipating it.

 

         This fear is not exclusive to marriage. There are many very bright, talented people who are under-educated, underemployed or who have not made the most of their gifts and abilities. They are afraid to live up to their potential and prefer to be ordinary – even sub par.

 

         It is my hope this new year, that we all conquer our fears, and attain true peace of mind in all avenues of our lives.

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Shidduch Sadness (Part II)”

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
Swiss Amb. to Iran Giulo Haas presents his credentials to Iranian Pres. Rouhani
‘US and Iranian Cartoon Doves’ Shown Defecating on Bibi by Swiss Amb to Iran
Latest Sections Stories
book-Lord-Get-Me-High

Even when our prayers are ignored and troubles confront us, Rabbi Shoff teaches that it is the same God who sent the difficulties as who answered our prayers before.

Schonfeld-logo1

I’ve put together some of the most frequently asked questions regarding bullies, friendship and learning disabilities.

book-Avi's-Choice

His parents make it clear that they feel the right thing is for Avi to visit his grandfather, but they leave it up to him.

There is a rich Jewish history in this part of the world. Now the hidden customs are being revealed, as many seek to reconnect with their roots.

There are times when a psychiatrist will over-medicate, which is why it’s important to find a psychiatrist whom you trust and feel comfortable with.

On November 22, 1963, Abraham Zapruder created one of the most famous, and valuable, pieces of film and became forever linked with one of the greatest American national tragedies when he stood with his camera on an elevated concrete abutment as President John F. Kennedy’s motorcade passed through Dealey Plaza in Dallas. Exhibited here is […]

“Worrying is carrying tomorrow’s load with today’s strength – carrying two days at once. It is moving into tomorrow ahead of time. Worrying doesn’t empty tomorrow of its sorrow, it empties today of its strength.” – Corrie ten Boom I’ve been thinking a lot about worrying. Anxiety is an issue close to my heart – […]

Don’t be afraid to try something different.

Upon meeting the Zionist delegation, General Wu, a recent convert to Christianity, said, “You are my spiritual brothers.

With the assistance of Mr. Tress, Private Moskowitz tried tirelessly to become an army chaplain.

Dr. Yael Respler is taking a well-deserved vacation this week and asked Eilon Even-Esh to share some thoughts with her readers in her stead.

More Articles from Cheryl Kupfer
Kupfer-On-Our-Own-NEW

What I call verbal terrorism is tragically not rare at all.

Kupfer-060515-Supermen

There are fathers who bravely step up to the plate and fill in the maternal vacuum with their love and devotion.

The message being conveyed is that without “flour,” without the means to support oneself and one’s family, one’s focus on Torah will be impeded by worry.

Divorce from a vindictive, cruel spouse can be a lifelong nightmare when there are offspring.

Not knowing any better, I assumed that Molly and her mother must be voracious readers.

Unpleasant happenings are quickly discarded if they do not affect us directly.

I have always insisted that everything that happens to anyone or anything is min Shamayim.

It is so hurtful to heighten people’s sense of inadequacy and guilt in a matzav that is already horrendous and difficult to bear.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/shidduch-sadness-part-ii/2007/09/11/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: