web analytics
January 26, 2015 / 6 Shevat, 5775
 
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post


Around The World In Three Hundred Days: Reflections On A Year In Israel

Most notable for me were the vegetables. Growing up in New York, I had never seen an authentic farm, and the closest I had come to authentic produce was when I went apple picking at the age of ten. I was not accustomed to fresh fruit and vegetables, and when I first tasted salad in Israel I was so amazed. I never believed vegetables could taste so good. I was also not aware of the variety of edible plants that are available. Though I got used to many foods during my year overseas, there were many vegetables I was never brave enough to try, among them olives, radishes, sprouts, and a whole array of foreign looking roots whose names I still haven’t learned.

Aside from the food, which was generally more spicy and flavorful than what I’m used to, the culture in Israel is, metaphorically a bit spicy and flavorful. Unlike in New York, it is not uncommon to hear unsolicited opinions and advice from strangers, and there is a comfortable feeling of casualness that makes you feel as if everyone is part of one big family. Until I got used to that sort of camaraderie, I was often insulted by what I felt were rude remarks from strangers, which, ironically, were not unlike the kind of blunt talk that is normally used only among family and close friends.

One of the funniest differences I’ve noticed between New York and Jerusalem is in the actions of pedestrians when reaching a crosswalk. It always amazed me to see a crowd of pedestrians waiting to cross a street, patiently waiting for the cross-walk signal, even with no cars in sight. At busy intersections, sometimes one or two people would walk across, disregarding the crosswalk sign, in which case they were either looked at disapprovingly or given the benefit of the doubt that they were tourists who don’t know better. I admit that there were many times that I was one of those odd ones out who crossed against the traffic signal, and I hope the astonished spectators gave me the benefit of the doubt, since I was, in fact, a tourist.

The year I spent in Israel was a wonderful experience for me in many ways. The spiritual, as well as personal growth I achieved during the year is something I will always treasure. Though the trip may not have turned me into a true traveler, it has deepened my appreciation for the growth and opportunities to be found in new places and experiences. I miss Israel very much and hope to go back one day, but meanwhile, I have many special memories to treasure as I try to re-acclimate to life in New York, and, once again, to life without clean air.

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Around The World In Three Hundred Days: Reflections On A Year In Israel”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Ilana Medar, 18, of Paris, made Aliyah last year.
Jewish Agency Planning for Massive Aliyah of 120,000 French Jews
Latest Sections Stories
Dr. Esther Rose Lowy

Dr. Lowy believed passionately in higher education for both men and women and would stop at nothing to assist young students in achieving their educational goals.

book-Lincoln

It’s almost pointless to try to summarize all of the fascinating information that Holzer’s research unearthed.

The special charm of these letters is their immediacy and authenticity of emotion and description.

Why is there such a steep learning curve for teachers? And what can we, as educators and community activists, do better in the educational system and keep first-year teachers in the job?

Teachers, as well as administrators, must be actively involved in the daily prayers that transpire at a school and must set the bar as dugmaot ishiot, role models, on how one must daven.

Often both girls and boys compare their date to their parents.

We love the food, the hotels, and even the wildlife. We love the Israelis.

Few traces remain of the glory days of Jewish life in the kingdoms of Sicily and Naples, but the demise wasn’t due to the eruption of nearby Mount Vesuvius. Rather it was a manmade volcano called the Edict of Expulsion from Spain – and not even an invitation to return in Shevat of 1740 could […]

Garbage in your streets, my city
Wind-blown litter, lonely men

I love you in your blazing heat
my aching feet
dragging in your streets.

These monsters constantly attack
When we dare to try to fight back

With so many new cases of ADHD reported each year, it is important to help children learn how to sit still.

More Articles from Y. Michel

As a person who grew up close to New York City, where everything is impressive and accessible, I never felt much of a need to go anywhere. In typical New York fashion, I considered local parks sufficient greenery, and never thought about traveling to places where the sky might be visible or that might have clean air. So it is not surprising that until last year the extent of my world travel consisted of several trips upstate, going to visit friends in New Jersey and Connecticut, and a couple of trips to Boston.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/teens-twenties/around-the-world-in-three-hundred-days-reflections-on-a-year-in-israel/2012/08/23/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: