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5. Following your dreams means a paying price, and you have to know if it’s worth paying. Many people go into majors and careers, with their eyes closed. They don’t know the downsides of their choices and they make no effort to seek it out. Many English majors are shocked to find out that the publishing world is extremely competitive and not always well paid.

Many history majors, who think they will be Indiana Jones, realize that they are raiders of the lost archives in the sense that they are organizing records for libraries. If that is the career you want, the sacrifices will be worth it, but the media often gives a false picture of what the career is like. I had always dreamed of working as a historian, but when I got an internship, I found I wasn’t suited for a life of painfully cataloging endless paperwork and the strong competition for professor jobs.

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Going to law school, I imagined I would be the next Clarence Darrow. I found out that I much preferred tax law and am hoping to take my career in that direction. In fact, criminal law is now the last job I would ever want to take. I followed my dreams, but I had the wisdom of knowing that making dreams a reality means learning the reality in the dreams.

I could go on discussing all the lessons my parents have lovingly nagged into me, but I imagine that would fill an entire newspaper. I can only say that I will be forever grateful to them and hope that sharing these tolls with you will give you some helpful tools for your path.

I have been immeasurably blessed. In a few months, I’ll have finished both a law degree and a masters’ degree, and I will stand up on a stage and get my diplomas. I know I’ll look down at the audience and see my parents, and I will know that I have flown to this place on the wings of my eagles, who only henpeck me out of love.
Thank you.

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