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September 21, 2014 / 26 Elul, 5774
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The Lion of Judah Rises

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Another major flaw was that there were a few too many B-shots of Polish life; it almost seemed like fill time that could have been better spent getting to know more of the students. An argument could be made it was highlighting the banality of evil, but I still wanted more information on the younger participants. Happily, the flaws are more than made up for by a nearly breathtakingly beautiful film.

The movie will be shown again on September 13th, at the Museum of Tolerance. For more information, please visit www.museumoftolerencenewyork.com/thelionofjudah the crew will be in attendance and the chance to hear Leo speak is not to be missed.

The Museum of Tolerance is located at 226 East 42nd Street in NYC. They can be reached at 212-697-1180.

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8 Responses to “The Lion of Judah Rises”

  1. Sue Knight says:

    Hello Elke Weiss, I note you say: "Most of the young Polish interviewees seem resentful of Jews and try to minimize the nation’s collective guilt over the genocide."

    Collective guilt! And, in the official history of WW2, are the Axis Powers now Poland, Poland and Poland?

    My own dear aged father fought in the Polish Free Forces – on the Allied Side, against Hitler (if I am still allowed to say that?) – and those forces made a significant contribution to the Allied Victory.

    Their reward?

    A brutal betrayal the moment the war ended, and vilification ever since. And now "collective guilt"…

    Is the moral of the story to stay out of these wars and stay neutral? Those countries that managed to do so saved their people from so much suffering, and they don't come in for any of this vilification either.

    Though, on a personal level, I am very very grateful to my father for making it to the UK against all the odds.

  2. Carol Dove says:

    "Most of the young Polish interviewees seem resentful of Jews and try to minimize the nation’s collective guilt over the genocide." I wish you would remember it was Poland that was attacked and now you are trying to instill guilt. Please stop victimizing Poland as they were attacked from all sides and fought to save Poland. Poland was not just fighting Nazi but Soviets as well. Far after the war was over Polish were still being killed by Soviets.

  3. Sue Knight says:

    Hello Carol, I suppose this is the new version of history. In the world of What Really Happened in WW2, Poland was occupied by both Hitler and Stalin and all Poles were targeted for genocide.

    "On August 22, 1939, on the invasion of Poland, Hitler gave explicit permission to his commanders to kill "without pity or mercy, men, women, and children of Polish descent or language"". (Wikipedia)

    The current version of WW2 is obviously quite different. I suppose it is a least a strong warning to be very careful about believing everything we are told – especially when it comes to war!

  4. Sue Knight says:

    Carol, I have replied to your post above – sorry, I intended it to appear here, but through some mystery of the internet, it floated off to the top.

  5. Edward Reid says:

    This writer has no clue. I lived in Poland amongst young Poles. I've been to the camps many times. What I saw? Disrespectful Israeli students mocking Poles. Millions of Poles died at the hands of the Nazis. Jews seem to forget this and dwell on exclusive suffering. They also forget that when the Soviets invaded from the east – many collaborated(FACT). Thus sending many Poles to their deaths. Poland was also ruled by a large majority Jewish Communist leadership until 1956 (FACT). Hey, Jewish Press – Why don't you have me write an article about Poles – an American who is not Polish, who lived in Poland and actually knows Polish people and history(FACT). It would make for an interesting and factual piece(FACT)!

  6. Edward Reid says:

    Remember what the Jews in Anders army did? Then how Anders treated them for treason. They should be grateful.

  7. The Germans must be delighted that you shift the blame for the Holocaust from Nazi Germany to Poland, a nation they brutally victimized. You are using a method successfully applied by the Nazi propaganda machine: " A lie repeated a thousand times becomes the truth".

  8. Sue Knight says:

    Of course, once you let the "collective guilt" geni out of the bottle, where does it stop? As the Hebrew Scriptures warn, "man has dominated man to his injury". To his injury, not to his good. At the moment, the politics of it, or the Political Correctness of it, seems to define who is "uber" – who may not be criticised or blamed – and who is "unter" – who can safely be criticised and vilified. But what then happens is that the double standards of "the world" get thrown into sharp relief.

    And my hope, Yvonne, Carol, Elke and Edward, and anybody else who may be reading, is that it will help us to think seriously about the God of Abraham's command that we are be "no part" of the world – to stand clear of its politics and its wars and its attitudes – to treat all with kindness and respect, whether they have PC-protection or not – and to trust in our Creator, who has promised us a rescue. Have any of the God of Abraham's promises ever failed? They never have, and they never will.

    Now, I don't want to be part of a world that vilifies my dear aged father because he was Polish. I want to draw close to God, who tells me to love and honour my parents. So please don't forget, there is a big silver lining to all this, but only thanks to the God of Abraham, the true God.

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