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October 24, 2014 / 30 Tishri, 5775
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The Importance Of A Medical List


(Names changed)


 


         A man passes out in the street. A woman is in an accident. A senior suffers a heart attack. A chronically ill grandmother gets disoriented and lost. Emergency help is called. These people are hospitalized. The doctors need to know whom to contact and what medications they are to receive. They need to know what illnesses they suffer from and any allergies they have before they can be treated properly. Who will talk for them, if they cannot speak for themselves?


 


         Carrying a medication list with you at all times is vital for the chronically ill, the elderly and anyone who is taking medication or has information that needs to be shared if they are unable to speak for themselves. Medic Alert bracelets and necklaces alert physicians to allergies and other medical problems and should be worn by anyone with a serious problem. But, what if you don’t have a serious problem? What if you are just hard of hearing and are on just a few medications? Who will speak for you, and is it important?


 


         David’s story: David was 92. He was sound in mind and body and could live by himself with minor cleaning support. His biggest problem was being hard of hearing and needing hearing aids. He also was taking a few medications since his heart attack over 20 years ago. David had moved to a warmer climate when he was 60. His daughter lived a short plane ride away. It was David’s custom to go for a short walk every morning to buy the newspaper and then go home and read it over his morning coffee.


 


         David rarely put in his hearing aids until after his morning paper walk. However, one morning David passed out on his way to the newsstand. An ambulance was called and he was taken to the nearest hospital. David can still remember the horror of what happened next. He remembers people looking at him at the hospital but not being able to hear what they were saying. He remembers not being able to tell them he couldn’t hear them.


 


         He was disoriented, frightened and confused. The next thing David remembers was waking up in the psychiatric ward of the hospital. People around him were yelling and behaving strangely. He was heavily sedated.


 


         David’s daughter called her father every day at the same time. It was their routine. When Shelly got no answer at the usual time and for hours later, she knew something was wrong. She immediately flew to her father’s house and finding it empty, started calling hospitals and checking police records. She located her father, brought him his hearing aids and started to try and fix the mistakes that had been made. But, as they both found, it was not easy to get him out of the ward into which he had been mistakenly placed.


 


            First, David had to prove his competence. At 92, David thought the doctors were crazy when they started to question him. What do you do with a chair? Where does a shoe go? David was getting more and more agitated and frustrated until he finally told them that, if they didn’t get him out of there, he would put the shoe on his foot, then sit on the chair and give the doctor a swift kick at the first opportunity.


 


         With that, the doctor’s saw he was indeed competent. Meanwhile David had gone through a harrowing experience and not only missed taking his medication for two days but received other medication that could have caused problems for him, because no one knew what he needed.


 


         Everyone, young and old, chronically ill or with a minor problem, should carry a medical list with them at all times. It is what will speak for you when you cannot speak for yourself. It should list the medications you are on, the dosages and how often you take them. It should list your allergies and any aids needed to function normally such as hearing aids, glasses, canes and even a wheelchair.


 


         It should list any conditions you have, a list of your doctors and whom to contact in case of an emergency. The list should be with you whenever you leave the house – perhaps in a clearly marked envelope in your wallet, pocket or purse. A second list should be clearly labeled and be put in a prominent place in your home if you live alone, or easily accessible for someone who lives with you. It should contain all the information you need to tell a doctor in an emergency. It will assist in any treatment you need, and could even save your life.


 


         You can reach me at annnovick@hotmail.com

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When one is blind one learns to use Braille to read. When one cannot walk, a wheelchair gives mobility. Sign language allows a mute person to speak and ocular implants assist in hearing when one is deaf. These are all compensatory strategies that help a person function despite his disability. But compensatory strategies are not just for physical problems. Understanding our psychological weaknesses and setting up our lives to ensure that we are not tempted to repeat our past mistakes, is as necessary as any aid to the disabled.

Well spouses have often discovered that their friends and relatives, despite their closeness to the situation, often don’t realize the tremendous emotional impact living with chronic illness has on the family. With the best intentions, suggestions, ideas and criticism are offered, based on the non-experience of those with healthy families. Even when the good intentioned get a taste of the difficulties, it is sometimes not enough for them to then identify and understand what the family of the chronically ill must face on a constant basis.

Over the past two weeks I have shared letters from a therapist and a well spouse. Both of the letters gave personal insights into the process of losing hope, how we react when that happens and some ways of coping when test scores, diagnosis and just simple repetitive behavior indicate that change for the better is impossible.

Dear Ann,

I’ve read your last few articles on psycho-neurological testing (Oct.8-22) with interest. As a therapist who has counseled couples dealing with chronic illness, I’d like to give you another perspective.

Dear Ann,

Your articles on the Neuro-Psychological Testing were right on (October 8-22). My husband underwent testing twice and your articles explained it things exactly the way they were. Besides the test, we also tried therapy.

Very often when we can’t face our big hurts or big loses we focus on the little ones. We can discuss those. We can cry over the small loses, be angry at the smaller hurts even though it may look trite and sound ridiculous to others.

Over the last two weeks we have been discussing one way in which well spouses can determine whether behavior displayed by their ill partners is caused by their illness or is a way they have chosen to act. We have focused on Psycho-Neurological testing, what it can tell us, as well as its pros and cons.

Last week I discussed a question that haunts many well spouses: not knowing if the difficult and often inappropriate behavior frequently displayed by their partners are caused by the disease and therefore not-controllable, or if the behavior is a choice the spouse makes and can therefore be changed. This doubt can be the source of much frustration and many marital disagreements. One way of alleviating this doubt is by having a psycho- neurological work up done. But that path is not so simple.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/the-importance-of-a-medical-list/2007/01/10/

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