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The Negev


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Yet the Negev desert is particularly advantageous for flower growing. The nearly all year sunny days and relatively warm winter temperatures of the Negev are excellent for growing Europe’s summer flowers. When that continent is experiencing cold weather, the Negev grows “off-season” summer flowers and then exports them to Europe, especially during the winter months which brings in lucrative profits.

The export sales price for one flower stem grown in Israel’s Negev wilderness earns five times the cost of growing it. The beauty of Israel never stops traveling to the international market.

When the Geula comes Dovid HaMelech informs us (Tehillim 126; 4) that it will be as surprising as the afikim (streams) that gush in the Negev.

As you travel along the Negev roads everything around seems parched and dry. The wadies are totally empty. All of a sudden, great roaring watercourses stream out of nowhere and overtake the area. These streams originate from the rains that fall in the mountainous regions and roll down in great speed to the Negev.

In the same way, the final yeshua will arrive seemingly from nowhere, startling us with its swiftness and overflowing with all the goodness and blessing we could wish for.

At the present point in time, it may seem that nothing is taking place, but we can be assured that “rain” is falling (events are taking place) in preparation for that Great Day. Just look around and see that all the signs are clearly visible. For instance, the blooming of the Negev we see today may be in anticipation of the rejuvenation of the wilderness and wasteland that is prophesied in Yeshayahu, Perek 35. Here the Navi says that the desert will bloom like a chavazelet (lily?) at the time of the Redemption. In the Messianic era, this area will become as lush and beautiful as the most beautiful part of the Land. May we all be privileged very, very soon to see the return of Hashem to Zion, in mercy.

About the Author: Originally from south Africa, Vardah has been living in Eretz Yisrael since 1974 and the more she learns about our glorious Holy Land the more she gets to love this prime property that Hashem has given to the Jewish People. She is studying to be a tour guide and hopes with the help of Hashem, through this column to give readers a small taste of the land.


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