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August 27, 2016 / 23 Av, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘airport’

Delta Malfunction Drama Still Paralyzing Passengers Worldwide

Wednesday, August 10th, 2016

A malfunctioning power control module at the Delta Airlines technology center in Atlanta has destroyed the travel plans of tens of thousands of people around the world — and it’s still happening.

The module went offline for just six hours starting at 2:30 am on Monday, but more than 1,600 flights have been cancelled since then.

Delta’s global computer system shut down, stranding thousands of passengers in various cities around the world and sending inaccurate information to the few airport screens that were still lit. No boarding passes would print, so agents were writing them out by hand in the few airports where Delta personnel tried to continue operations. Many of the travelers who were left hanging — and more — continue to be stranded 48 hours later.

Backup systems that were supposed to provide a safety net in exactly such a situation failed to do so, and it’s not clear why.

Worse, more delays and cancellations are still expected, according to Delta officials, although the carrier hopes to resume regular operations by Wednesday afternoon.

Delta CEO Ed Bastian said in a second video posted to the airline’s website Tuesday that by Monday, the airline had already cancelled 800 flights; triple the number of Delta cancellations in all of 2015.

“This isn’t the qualify of service, the reliability that you’ve come to expect from Delta Air Lines,” Bastian said. “We’re very sorry, I’m personally very sorry.”

Hana Levi Julian

BDS Activist Denied Entry to Israel, Deported at Ben Gurion International Airport

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016

A Swiss activist with the Boycott, Divest and Sanctions (BDS) movement has been deported from Israel for the first time, according to Channel 2 News.

Rita Faye has visited the Jewish State a number of times in the past, and is known for her harassment of IDF soldiers at Palestinian Authority crossing checkpoints around Jericho.

She is a member of a Christian organization that supports the BDS movement and has recorded the activities of the soldiers she has tracked, and then sent the information abroad, according to the report.

Upon her arrival at Ben Gurion International Airport on Tuesday, she was taken for questioning by security personnel.

Faye was put back on a plane with a deportation issued by Interior Minister Arye Deri at the request of the IDF when it was discovered she was headed to Israel.

Hana Levi Julian

BGI Airport’s Terminal 3 Evacuated After Little Boy Cries ‘Terrorist!’

Thursday, July 28th, 2016

Thousands of people were evacuated from Terminal 3 at Ben Gurion International Airport on Thursday after a boy at the airport identified what he though was a suspicious-looking man and began to shout, “Terrorist! Terrorist!”

Airport security personnel were forced to rapidly evacuate passengers and crew from the terminal on what was one of the busiest travel days of the summer due to the suspected threat, according to Walla! News.

Only after a thorough investigation was conducted did it become clear that the man who seemed so scary to the child was actually no threat at all, and was just an innocent traveler.

Hana Levi Julian

Entebbe: ‘Israel Was Right – And Fortunately the Mission Succeeded’

Monday, July 4th, 2016

It was the 200th birthday of the United States of America, and three C-130 Hercules military transport planes silently flew through the night to land at a darkened landing strip with enough Israeli commandos and fake official Ugandan vehicles to make it through airport security.

The Israelis ultimately rescued 102 Air France passengers and crew being held hostage by Arab and German terrorists at the old terminal in the Entebbe international airport, who were under the military protection of then-Ugandan President Idi Amin.

On Monday, 40 years later to the day, Uganda President Yoweri Museveni stood beside Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday to mark the 40th anniversary of the miraculous rescue. He said the Jewish State had been right to carry out the long-distance operation.

Netanyahu called the mission “a watershed moment for my people.” Operation Thunderbolt is now called Operation Yonatan in memory of his older brother who lost his life leading the mission.

The prime minister also referenced the Holocaust during his remarks, saying Jews had been murdered by the millions, stateless. “The State of Israel has changed that. Perhaps it was in Entebbe,” he said, “where this transformation was seen by the world. We were poweless no more.”

Museveni agreed, saying that for Uganda as well, the operation had marked a turning point.

“Your brother Jonathan, some Israeli hostages and some Ugandan soldiers were killed here,” he told Netanyahu in remarks at a ceremony with journalists at the airport. “Fortunately, the rescue mission succeeded.”

Netanyahu’s brother Yonatan, “Yoni” was the leader of the commando unit who raced into the terminal to rescue the passengers; he was also the sole casualty in the operation, leading the way, he was hit by terrorist gunfire in the first moments the soldiers were seen.

Benjamin Netanyahu, his younger brother, was in the same elite Sayeret Matkal unit at the time but due to the IDF rule not to allow two brothers in the same operation, he was not involved in the rescue. Instead, he learned when they returned that he had lost his brother.

Museveni told those gathered at the airport that Idi Amin’s “hobnobbing with terrorists was a crime in itself,” and called the raid “another bond” that connected “Palestine to Africa.” He slammed what he called “indiscriminate violence” and said it didn’t matter if the “cause is just.”

Prior to 1948, the Jews who came to resettle the reborn State of Israel called their endeavor the “yishuv” (settlement in Hebrew) and referred to the geographic region as “Palestine.” They called themselves “Palestinians” — just as the newspaper which today is The Jerusalem Post was at that time called “The Palestine Post.”

Hana Levi Julian

Israel Gives Security Lessons to Airport Security Execs

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Israel may be a pariah on the world stage when it comes to votes in the United Nations, but “secretly” it is apparently a great leader when it comes to keeping a country’s population safe. Security personnel have been streaming into Israel for years already to learn the ABC’s of keeping their countries safe, starting, of course, with the gateways to their nations — the airport.

Now, in light of the recent crash of EgyptAir flight MS804 and worldwide terror attacks, it’s no surprise to find airport executives from 40 nations are set to arrive in Israel next month.

The international airport representatives will arrive at Ben Gurion International Airport – one of the world’s safest – where they will learn first-hand about creative security procedures.

Since 1972, there has not been a single hijacking incident from Israel. But unless you’re very, very watchful, you would not notice the numerous security layers through which every individual passes at the airport. As such, security at BGI doesn’t disrupt the flow of traffic, nor does it do much to bother the traveler passing through the terminal.

The BGI Airport Security Operations Center, for example, is the heartbeat of the airport, monitoring every flight and checking the background of every passenger and flight crew member who is to pass through Israeli air space. Red-flagged individuals merit special attention and there are at least ten of those per day, according to a report by The Tower, quoting CNN.

But you’d never know it – in fact, one cannot even find it.

Earlier this year Israel also issued an additional security directive to airlines that fly to the Jewish State in order to address other potential threats such as the terrorists who recently were responsible for bringing down a Russian airliner last year in the Sinai Peninsula.

Those include insiders working at airports and resorts with access to passengers’ luggage.

Or, for that matter, airline personnel and cabin crew themselves, such as the depressed Germanwings co-pilot who became suicidal while flying a passenger plane. He took an entire aircraft filled with passengers along with him into death in March 2015.

Israeli security methods work partly because the system is flexible and responsive to dynamic situations, according to aviation security expert Shalom Dolev, who spoke with CNN.

By the time a passenger has reached an airline check-in counter, that individual has probably already passed up to five security checks, usually noticing only three: the initial entry point at the gate, the security check to allow the passenger in to the line for check-in, and the security officer who asks the “annoying questions that make no sense” before one reaches the check-in counter.

When those 40 airport executives leave Israel, they too will understand those “annoying questions” a little better — and perhaps begin to implement similar strategies in their own nations.

Hana Levi Julian

Sweden Grounds All Flights in Stockholm

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

The Stockholm Air Traffic Authority grounded all aircraft on Thursday due to a “network communications” problem.

“No planes are allowed to take off at the moment and we’re taking down the planes in the air,” said spokesman Per Froberg. “It’s a network communications problem.”  Froberg declined to provide further details.

The move came just as Egyptian and French officials were informing media that Egypt Air Flight MS804 had crashed earlier in the day in the Mediterranean Sea. No cause has yet been determined for the tragedy.

Hana Levi Julian

EgyptAir Flight MS804 Disappears Over Mediterranean

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

Egypt Air Flight MS804 en route to Cairo from Paris disappeared over the Mediterranean Sea early Thursday morning.

The plane was an Airbus 320 manufactured in 2003. It went off the radar 10 minutes out of Egyptian airspace at 02:45 local time (CLT), as it was cruising at an altitude of approximately 37,000 feet.

The aircraft departed Charles de Gaulle airport at 23:09 CEST. Civil aviation officials in Egypt were quoted by Vice News as saying the aircraft ‘probably crashed into the sea.’ A French airport official who requested anonymity told Reuters, “It did not land. That is all we can say for the moment.”

Government officials in Greece are investigating a report by a merchant ship’s captain who said he saw “a flame in the sky” over the area in the Mediterranean in which the plane disappeared.

The pilot, identified as Captain Mohamed Shokeir, was highly experienced with more than 6,000 flight hours, according to the Al Ahram daily. The copilot had more than 2,000 flight hours.

At the time, the aircraft was carrying 56 passengers with three security personnel and seven cabin crew, Gulf Business.com reported. The passengers included 15 French nationals, 30 Egyptians, two Iraqis, one from the UK and a Canadian, as well as a Belgian, a Saudi, a Sudani, a Czech national, one Portuguese and an individual from Algiers.

Egyptian Army fighter jets and Greek ships are searching together for the missing EgyptAir plane, according to Al Ahram.

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/egyptair-flight-ms804-disappears-over-mediterranean/2016/05/19/

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