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The Collective Jew

Monday, August 19th, 2013
I keep trying to make this point to show what I believe is the unique Israel. In the last few weeks, three incidents have happened that once again reinforce what I have known all my life. Am I wrong to believe there is no other country in the world that would do these things?

Here’s the first amazing story:

A young cancer patient on the way to the US with a bunch of other sick kids can’t find her passport.

With no other choice, the young girl was removed from the plane and the plane prepared to depart after a fruitless search on the plane, in the airport, everywhere. Minutes before takeoff, while the plane was taxiing to the runway, they found the passport in another child’s backpack.

Too late, no? The stewardess told the pilot – the pilot radioed the tower and was given permission to turn back. The story appears here.

As the child cried, so too did people on the plane – and the stewardesses, and people on the ground. Amazing.

And the second story…

David Finti is 19 years old. He is a Romanian Jew. While boarding a train, David was electrocuted and severely burned. The local Jewish community contacted the Jewish Agency. They recognize the collectivism of our people just as on the Israeli side it was recognized as well. And so, Israel flew the young man to Israel, making him an Israeli citizen so that he could get critical care free of charge. David and his parents were flown to Israel and are now at Hadassah’s Ein Kerem hospital. The story appears here.

Yet another story in the last few days has come to light. Israel recently managed to bring in another 17 Yemenite Jews – leaving 90 left.What amazes me is that we were able to bring another group here to Israel and more, that we know how many remain. We are watching, waiting, hoping to bring the last remnants of what was once a great community here to Israel.

It is what we do. Three stories of how Israel watches, Israel waits, Israel acts.

Visit A Soldier’s Mother.

IDF Re-Opens Eilat Airport Departures after Scare Warning

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

The IDF allowed departing flights to take off from Eilat’s international airport Thursday night after ordering it closed for two hours, without any explanation other than to note “an evaluation of the situation.”

The temporary closure probably was connected to terrorist activity in the neighboring Sinai Peninsula, where Egyptian forces have arrested approximately 100 terrorists in the past several days.

Planes taking off from Eilat have been equipped with an anti-missile system since this past April in order to defend passengers against shoulder-launched anti-aircraft missiles that terrorists are known to possess.

Hezbollah Transferred $100,000 to Burgas Bombers Before Attack

Saturday, July 27th, 2013

The Bulgarian news site, 24 Hours, reports that Hezbollah transferred $100,000 to the men that are suspected of carrying out the Burgas airport bombing on July 18, 2012, that killed 5 Israelis, a Muslim bus driver, and wounded 35 people.

Bulgaria named two Lebanese citizens, Maliad Farah (who also had an Australian passport), and Hassan El Hajj Hassan (who is also an Canadian citizen), as accomplices. The bomber is believed to have been killed in the explosion.

Their fake US driver licenses were printed at Beirut’s Lebanese International University.

July 4, Day of Operation Entebbe, Israel Upgrades Uganda Airport

Thursday, July 4th, 2013

An Israeli firm won a contract this week to upgrade systems at Uganda’s Entebbe airport, where a daring IDF mission on July 4, 1976, rescued 105 hostages from a hijacked airplane

Trilogical Technologies won the bid to integrate and implement systems that cover manpower, vehicle and equipment serving the airport’s ground services,  according to Israel Defense.

It said Trilogical’s software and hardware products will be integrated for management of existing resources  and carrying out missions in its airspace. Its computer system will be installed for the first time in Entebbe’s luggage, passenger and maintenance departments.

Ironically, the control systems will be installed “for control and warning in the event of operational or security irregularities” according to the report.

“There is a great deal of symbolism in the date when we are beginning the project,” said Trilogical CEO Erez Lorber.

The ability of the Israeli commandos to land at the airport without being detected was the key to its success, which was marred by the death of the commander of Operation Entebbe, Col. Yoni Netanyahu, brother of the prime minister.

One of the officers on the mission, a neighbor of mine, recently told me that almost no one in the hand-picked units believed that they would take off for the rescue operation because the scheme was “beyond imagination.”

The hostage crisis began on June 27 when Arab terrorists, helped by a German revolutionary cell, hijacked an Air France plane en route from Tel Aviv to Paris via Athens and demanded the release of prisoners in Israel in return for releasing the Israeli hostages.

After a week of planning, Operation Entebbe began on July and lasted approximately one hour. Besides the death of Netanyahu, five commandos suffered injuries and three hostages were killed.

The commandos landed in the dark of night, killed 45 Ugandan soldiers and destroyed 30 Soviet-built MiGs to prevent them from being used against the Israeli force.

Israeli firms had helped build the Entebbe airport, and their possession of blueprints of the facility was crucial towards the operation’s success.

When the Israeli planes, a cargo plane rolled out a black Mercedes that was a duplicate of Uganda President Idi Amin’s vehicle.

The element of surprise enabled the commandos to eliminate opposition forces and rescue the hostages, except for two who were killed by IDF fire and a third who was caught in crossfire.

The raid has been attributed to putting a stop to the wave of international terrorist hijackings, but United Nations Secretary General at that time, Kurt Waldheim, condemned Israel for “a serious violation of the national sovereignty of a United Nations member state.”

Leaving Israel – a First Impression

Tuesday, June 11th, 2013

My first real sense that I was really going to do this thing – leave Israel without my husband and children and go on this business trip was saying goodbye at the airport. It has, for the last decade or more, me saying goodbye to them and driving back home, sad that he or she has left, but less sad than before because there was always the knowledge that I was where I wanted to be and they, whoever they were, would come back, come home.

This is the way it has been each time with my children – so far Amira and Elie and Shmulik only; this is the way it was the few times my husband has flown. This is how it has been each time Yaakov and Chaim went to that other home, the one of their parents, until they came back (or will come back soon) to the home they’ve chosen for themselves.

This time, for the first time, it is me leaving. My bags being packed, my clothes and things, and my husband left to drive the car back to the amazing life and home and family we have built in Israel. I had my first doubts then…because there is another love that I left. I take my family with me – in my heart, in too many phone calls already with Aliza and my husband.

To SMS text messages or emails or pictures I am taking to show them…the cars for Shmulik and Davidi; the hotel for Aliza; the stores and signs for Amira…and I’ll find something to take for Elie too.

But what I couldn’t take with me was that other love of my life – Israel. Leaving Israel behind was more painful than I can explain. There was never a question I’d go back to my family, but I found myself promising Israel that I’d be home soon too. How insane is that? Never mind, this is my blog and I can express my insanity here, so there it is.

So, my first impression of leaving was tremendous pride – reinforced later when I landed in Rome Airport.

In Israel – Terminal 3 Departure Hall – where all outgoing passengers go – is amazing. With all of my experience of two airports (London and Rome), I have to say Israel shines. There is free Internet – use it, surf, have fun.

There are free charging stations – for phones (including plugs for the universal USB, the iPhone and more) and empty plugs so I recharge my laptop and work a bit. All the duty free shops – tons. American chocolate…don’t ask, tons of alcohol – too bad I don’t drink…(can’t stand the taste).

I called my oldest daughter and joked that I was moving there permanently. What more could you need – wide open spaces, bathrooms close by (ones that are cleaned for you, no less), free Internet, a wide variety of food stores – including one called Chocolate and More.

What more could you need?

I was a bit disappointed that the Alitalia plane arrived late and so we got a late start.- but in the scheme of things, it wasn’t that big a deal. I think I just expected everything to run so perfectly – but not a big deal.

Within a short time, I was off…as I sat waiting on the plane to take off, a wave of…something, came over me. Melancholy? I’ve always loved that word. Hesitation? I’m not sure.

I took out my camera and felt the need to take pictures…this is Israel – and I promise you, Israel, I’ll be home very soon.

Leaving Israel…from the runway, from the air…that last glimpse backwards…that’s my next post…

Visit A Soldier’s Mother.

Obama Visit ‘Strangles’ Israel

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

Hundreds of thousands of Israelis will be adversely affected by United States President Barack Hussein Obama’s visit to Israel.  The Israeli media and political bigwigs may be all gaga with excitement, but most other Israelis are filled with total dread.  The main road from Ben Gurion International Airport a.k.a. Natbag (Ben Gurion Airport) will be closed for hours today and when he finally leaves.

The King David Hotel has been brimming with activity, getting dozens of suites ready for the “royal” entourage; the 15,000-strong police detail is gearing up to guard against security breaches; streets and highways are being cleared of cars and closed off; the foreign press is descending en masse from all corners of the globe and provided space in which to set up their computers, microphones, and cameras; the local media have been promoting the coverage they will devote to the hot event; menus are being planned, speeches crafted, and the newly crowned Miss Israel — an immigrant from Ethiopia — is excitedly awaiting the gala dinner at President Shimon Peres’ house, where she will be introduced to her counterpart, Mr. America.

And all this is in spite of Obama’s decision not to address the Knesset. Indeed, he claimed that the purpose of this trip was to “connect with the people.”

To this end, the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv invited college students from around the country to submit essays on why they should be selected to attend the president’s large-scale “meet and greet” at the Jerusalem Convention Center. Given Obama’s insistence on being surrounded by sycophants, one can only imagine the syrupy content of the chosen applications. One can also figure out why Ariel University students were told they may not enter the competition. (Ruthie Blum)

Many, many Jerusalem roads will be closed off periodically during the too long visit, as will roads going from his hotel, The King David, which is in the center of Jerusalem, to all of the various buildings he’ll be entering in addition to the south of Jerusalem when he goes to a from Bethlehem and the north of Jerusalem when he goes to Ramallah.  And that Ramallah visit means that the large, normally bustling commercial-industrial center Sha’ar Binyamin will be closed off from its only access road.

This visit, on the Eve of the Passover Holiday is so horrendously timed that all involved would be totally condemned for their incompetent thoughtlessness and selfishness.  I know that I have been blogging an awful lot about it issue, but I’m not exaggerating one iota.

We Jews are an ancient and distinguished people.  We should have the confidence to remember that.  We also must remember that our help and salvation comes from God Almighty, not from the United States.

What is the theme of Passover?

עבדים היינו לפרעה במצרים, עתה בני חורין Avodim hayinu liparoah bamitzrayim, atoh bnei chorin We were slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt; now we’re free men

Yes, that’s it in a nutshell.  It’s derived from the Bible,

Deuteronomy Chapter 6 דְּבָרִים. This is the time we’re supposed to remember that everything, including the State of Israel, our security, economic success and more are the gifts from God.  There is no human who can save us or help us.  This Obama-worship is a danger to the Nation, the People of Israel.

Davka, now on the Eve of Passover we should be remembering that our salvation will come only from God, not the President of the United States.

Visit Shiloh Musings.

Title: Alone in Africa

Friday, November 9th, 2012

Author: Avigail Sharer
Publisher: Israel Bookshop Publications

Alone in Africa, by Avigail Sharer, is an original adventure story about three siblings named Nesanel, Penina and Chezky Feiner, who are, well, alone in Africa. Except they aren’t entirely alone – they have animals and two battling African tribes to keep them company.

It all started when the three Feiner kids were flying from home in London without their parents to visit their grandparents in South Africa. The airport-provided chaperon was a rookie teenager who didn’t know what to do when the airplane made an emergency landing in the jungle. The kids became separated from the other passengers, who were driven away by military Jeeps to the airport. That is how they became “alone in Africa.”

They were found by an African tribe named the Lulu was who thought that Nesanel was a prophet named Gift of G-d. The other children escaped, but Nesanel was kept. When Nesanel attempted to escape, his plan was foiled when he was captured by a different African tribe named the Bakayas, who were at war with the Luluwas. There was a rescue attempt by Penina and Chezky, but was it successful?

I liked Alone in Africa for a number of reasons. The plot was fast-paced and full of twists and turns; at one moment they were wandering through the jungle, the next moment they were captured. My personal favorite part of this book was the idea of a non-poisonous, poisonous frog (when you read it you’ll know). The story is also very informative about survival skills. I would recommend Alone in Africa to potential jungle explorers of ages 9-10 who are ready to tackle a chapter book of over 230 pages.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/books/book-reviews/title-alone-in-africa/2012/11/09/

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