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August 29, 2014 / 3 Elul, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘airport’

Title: Alone in Africa

Friday, November 9th, 2012

Author: Avigail Sharer
Publisher: Israel Bookshop Publications

Alone in Africa, by Avigail Sharer, is an original adventure story about three siblings named Nesanel, Penina and Chezky Feiner, who are, well, alone in Africa. Except they aren’t entirely alone – they have animals and two battling African tribes to keep them company.

It all started when the three Feiner kids were flying from home in London without their parents to visit their grandparents in South Africa. The airport-provided chaperon was a rookie teenager who didn’t know what to do when the airplane made an emergency landing in the jungle. The kids became separated from the other passengers, who were driven away by military Jeeps to the airport. That is how they became “alone in Africa.”

They were found by an African tribe named the Lulu was who thought that Nesanel was a prophet named Gift of G-d. The other children escaped, but Nesanel was kept. When Nesanel attempted to escape, his plan was foiled when he was captured by a different African tribe named the Bakayas, who were at war with the Luluwas. There was a rescue attempt by Penina and Chezky, but was it successful?

I liked Alone in Africa for a number of reasons. The plot was fast-paced and full of twists and turns; at one moment they were wandering through the jungle, the next moment they were captured. My personal favorite part of this book was the idea of a non-poisonous, poisonous frog (when you read it you’ll know). The story is also very informative about survival skills. I would recommend Alone in Africa to potential jungle explorers of ages 9-10 who are ready to tackle a chapter book of over 230 pages.

Bumped!

Friday, November 2nd, 2012

Rabbi Feld headed out to the airport early in the morning. He was flying to the wedding of one of his congregants, Mr. Krauss, who had purchased him a complimentary ticket. Although the wedding was scheduled for late afternoon, they had booked an early flight to allow ample time.

After checking in, Rabbi Feld sat in the boarding lounge, learning his Daf. Across the lounge, he noticed Rabbi Dayan waiting for the same flight. Rabbi Feld went over and introduced himself.

“I’m heading to a wedding in Chicago,” said Rabbi Feld. “By any chance, are you also attending?”

“No,” replied Rabbi Dayan. “I was invited to give a shiur.”

As the talked, an announcement came over the loudspeaker: “Continental flight 473 to Chicago is overbooked. There is an additional flight at 12 p.m. Passengers willing to be rescheduled to that flight will be granted a free round-trip ticket to anywhere that Continental flies. Please approach one of the Continental representatives near the boarding gate.”

Rabbi Feld couldn’t believe his ears. A free ticket to anywhere Continental flies! He could get a free round-trip ticket to Israel in exchange for a few hours’ delay. He looked at his watch. Even with the later flight, he should arrive at 3 p.m., just in time to make the wedding. “Should I risk it?” he thought to himself.

While he considered the issue, he further questioned: Since the family sponsored the ticket, perhaps they would be entitled to the bonus ticket? It was their money, after all.

A few people started heading over to the flight representatives. Rabbi Feld needed to make a quick decision. He turned to Rabbi Dayan and explained the situation. “Can I take the later flight?” he asked. “If I do, who gets the ticket?”

“Whether you can take the later flight depends on what you expect Mr. Krauss would want,” said Rabbi Dayan. “The bonus ticket would certainly belong to you, though.”

Rabbi Feld decided that it would be irresponsible to risk arriving late for the wedding, despite the potential gain.

“Thank you; I’ll keep the flight,” he said to Rabbi Dayan. “Now that we have some time, though, could you please explain the reason for what you said?”

“When a person gives a gift, we evaluate his intention in giving it,” said Rabbi Dayan. “Mr. Krauss clearly bought you a ticket so that you could participate in his simcha. Therefore, you should act with it in accordance with his intention. Presumably, he would not want you to arrive late for the wedding.” (See 241:5; 246:1)

“I probably would just be able to make it, unless there were unexpected delays,” said Rabbi Feld. “Is that acceptable?”

“The same principle applies,” replied Rabbi Dayan. “If Mr. Krauss would be willing for you to take the risk in light of the tremendous gain, it would be permitted. This would likely depend on whether you were asked to be the mesader kiddushin. If you were meant to lead the wedding or take an important role in the chuppah, presumably he would not be willing to have you take any risk; if you were just a guest – albeit an important one – he would probably concede.”

“What about the bonus ticket?” asked Rabbi Feld. “I know that in some cases an agent who bought something and received a bonus must share it with the sender who paid the money [C.M. 183:6]. Here, Mr. Krauss paid for the ticket.”

“Correct, but this does not apply here for a number of reasons,” said Rabbi Dayan. “First, the bonus ticket would be issued under your name. Rashi explains that the bonus is shared because we are unsure to whom the seller intended to give it, the sender who paid the money or the agent who executed the purchase. Accordingly, when the bonus is explicitly designated to the agent, he is entitled to it.” (Rama 183:6)

“But don’t some later authorities question this ruling?” said Rabbi Feld.

“Yes, and some suggest that an agent should share the bonus with the sender even if explicitly given to him,” said Rabbi Dayan. (See Be’er Heiteiv 183:21; S.A. Harav, Mechira #11) “However, the Rashba writes that if the agent received the bonus because he benefited the seller, everyone would agree that it belongs completely to the agent [Ketzos 183:7]. Here, the bonus ticket is not because of the initial purchase, but because you were willing to be bumped from the early flight.”

Woman Dies on El Al Flight

Wednesday, October 17th, 2012

An American woman died on El Al’s Tel Aviv-New York flight on Tuesday.

Medical personnel that happened to be on the flight tried to save her, but weren’t able to. She died 6 hours into the flight.

The woman’s family in New York were informed by El Al, and were waiting at the airport.

UFO Halts Ben-Gurion Airport Traffic

Wednesday, October 10th, 2012

With the military jumpy over the incursion of an enemy drone deep into Israeli airspace on Saturday, the IAF is taking no chances when they see something unusual on their radar screens, which are apparently now set at their highest sensitivity levels.

Around 5:00 AM on Wednesday morning, IAF fighter jets were scrambled over Ben Gurion Airport after IAF radar systems detected an unidentified flying object over the airport. All international flights were put on hold, and landing planes had to switch to a holding pattern as the fighter jets checked everything out.

Galei Tzahal reports that the all-clear was given a few minutes later and the planes were allowed to land.

There’s no report as to what the radar had detected.

This is the second time the IAF has scrambled fighter jets since Saturday. Earlier in week, they sent jets over Beit Shemesh, but that turned out to be nothing.

An IDF source is saying that the army would prefer to be more careful and not take extra chances.

Also, it turns out that Saturday’s F-16 had to launch two anti-aircraft missiles at the drone in order to shoot it down because of the drone’s low heat signature prevented a good lock the first time.

 

See: Related Cartoon

 

 

Religious Passengers Stranded at Ben-Gurion Over Shabbat

Saturday, September 29th, 2012

Chadarei Chaderim reports: US Airways flight number 796 from Philadelphia, landed at 4:00 on Friday afternoon, instead of the expected 2:15 PM.

The doors to the plane only opened at the terminal at 5:20 PM, and passengers arrived at the passport control at 5:30.

Rav Yochanan Chayat, the El Al rabbi was called, and he in turn called Zaka for assistance.

Zaka had passport control open a special lane for religious passengers to rush them through.

And by the time Shabbat arrived, Zaka managed to bring around 100 mattresses to the airport, and collect enough food from a number of Bnei Brak stores for the passengers who were going to be stranded in the airport over Shabbat.

The only question is, who in their right mind willingly flies on a flight that will hopefully arrive only 3 hours before Shabbat, knowing that flights get delayed all the time?

Red Hot Chili Peppers Rock Tel Aviv

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012

The “Red Hot Chili Peppers” performed in Tel Aviv on Monday night, a decade after they canceled their show due to security issues. It was the group’s first visit to Israel, and to make the most of it, the members went to the Western Wall in Jerusalem straight from the airport. The band talked about Hillel Slovak, one of their founding members, who died from a drug overdose in the early 1990s.

“Hillel Slovak forever!” band leader Anthony Kiedis shouted on stage, adding, “I must say, Hillel had his own brand of Israeli funk, pretty sure he invented it. That Israeli funkinstein.” Guitarist Flea added, “He went out to a trip in Israel, and he came back and he was so lit up and so excited and so full of love, and to come here today and think of him it’s truly a dream.” The band dedicated the song “Other Side” to the city of Haifa, where Slovak was born.

Slovak is not the only Jewish connection of the Peppers. Current guitarist Josh Klinghoffer is Jewish, and is related to Leon Klinghoffer, the elderly man in a wheelchair who was murdered by terrorists aboard the Achille Lauro in 1985.

Pro-Palestinian groups in Lebanon, where the band performed just a few nights before, were outraged about the Peppers’ decision to perform in Israel, and even threatened the opening acts in Beirut to not perform, causing one of the bands to cancel. Peppers’ drummer Chad Smith tweeted earlier this week: “In any city of any country we play … Our sole purpose is to uplift people thru our music. Nothing more. Nothing less … that’s it.”

So Happy Together

Wednesday, August 1st, 2012

The day following our oldest daughter’s wedding in Eretz Yisrael was the day we had planned for my husband to return to his job in the U.S. I was staying for another week in Israel with the rest of our children and my dear mother in order to participate in the remaining wedding celebrations.

Baruch Hashem, after shedding some tears, my husband agreed to stay with us for the rest of the week. His new return flight was an hour and a half before the rest of our flights. At least now we would spend the rest of our vacation together, traveling to the airport and going through security and passport control as a family. We were thrilled with my husband’s decision to stay and grateful to Hashem for allowing us the opportunity to share a simcha together.

The days sped by. While in Israel we were supposed to help our daughter complete a scholarship form for seminary. Working on that form got pushed off until the day we were leaving Israel. When we were at the airport, after engaging in a long discussion with his new son-in-law, my husband was finally able to do the form online with our daughter. By the time the two of them had finished, I was in a near panic. The time had passed by much too quickly and the airport’s lines were getting longer and longer. I had never before seen such a flood of people at Ben Gurion Airport.

Though we asked again, El Al would not change my husband’s ticket so he could join us on our flight. We raced together through check-in but had to be separated at the ticketing counter in order for my husband to be able to board his flight on time. I was very disappointed and frightened that he was not going to be with us when we went through passport control. Even though we had gone through great lengths to prevent a mishap from occurring, I still worried that an official would decide to single out one of our children (who held dual citizenship for army service).

I took my seat on the plane with, Baruch Hashem, all of our children near me – and not on their way to serve in the Israeli army! After having a good cry because I was leaving my newly married daughter in Israel, I decided I was due some relaxation. Now that all the months of planning, along with the traveling and busy week, were behind us, I really needed some undisturbed quiet. Instead, I kept thinking about retrieving and transporting all of our luggage, helping my mother make her connecting flight, and finding reliable transportation to our cars without my husband’s assistance. With great siyata d’shemaya we had done well up to this point, so I told myself once again that now was the time to simply relax and enjoy the week’s good memories.

We all rushed off the plane (which had been delayed in take-off), as my mother had to make her connecting flight to Los Angeles. When we were in line at Passport Control, I heard her sweet voice call out, “Jodi, David’s here.” I was delighted; we were going to be reunited. Knowing that my husband was in a rush to go to work, I was eager to find out why he was still at the airport.

After boarding the plane for his 11:30 p.m. flight, he discovered that EL Al had to conduct a security operation because a passenger had checked in luggage but failed to show up for the flight. The passengers had to remain on the plane for an hour and a half while all the luggage was removed from the belly of the plane and put back in again. Our plane took off right after my husband’s plane at 1 a.m. And that’s how we all arrived at the airport in New York at around the same time.

My husband was able to help us with our luggage, with my mom’s flight, and with transportation to our cars. It felt so nice and secure to be able to walk out of the airport together – as a family.

So happy together!

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/jewish-columns/lessons-in-emunah/so-happy-together/2012/08/01/

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