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September 30, 2014 / 6 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘airport’

Obama Visit ‘Strangles’ Israel

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

Hundreds of thousands of Israelis will be adversely affected by United States President Barack Hussein Obama’s visit to Israel.  The Israeli media and political bigwigs may be all gaga with excitement, but most other Israelis are filled with total dread.  The main road from Ben Gurion International Airport a.k.a. Natbag (Ben Gurion Airport) will be closed for hours today and when he finally leaves.

The King David Hotel has been brimming with activity, getting dozens of suites ready for the “royal” entourage; the 15,000-strong police detail is gearing up to guard against security breaches; streets and highways are being cleared of cars and closed off; the foreign press is descending en masse from all corners of the globe and provided space in which to set up their computers, microphones, and cameras; the local media have been promoting the coverage they will devote to the hot event; menus are being planned, speeches crafted, and the newly crowned Miss Israel — an immigrant from Ethiopia — is excitedly awaiting the gala dinner at President Shimon Peres’ house, where she will be introduced to her counterpart, Mr. America.

And all this is in spite of Obama’s decision not to address the Knesset. Indeed, he claimed that the purpose of this trip was to “connect with the people.”

To this end, the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv invited college students from around the country to submit essays on why they should be selected to attend the president’s large-scale “meet and greet” at the Jerusalem Convention Center. Given Obama’s insistence on being surrounded by sycophants, one can only imagine the syrupy content of the chosen applications. One can also figure out why Ariel University students were told they may not enter the competition. (Ruthie Blum)

Many, many Jerusalem roads will be closed off periodically during the too long visit, as will roads going from his hotel, The King David, which is in the center of Jerusalem, to all of the various buildings he’ll be entering in addition to the south of Jerusalem when he goes to a from Bethlehem and the north of Jerusalem when he goes to Ramallah.  And that Ramallah visit means that the large, normally bustling commercial-industrial center Sha’ar Binyamin will be closed off from its only access road.

This visit, on the Eve of the Passover Holiday is so horrendously timed that all involved would be totally condemned for their incompetent thoughtlessness and selfishness.  I know that I have been blogging an awful lot about it issue, but I’m not exaggerating one iota.

We Jews are an ancient and distinguished people.  We should have the confidence to remember that.  We also must remember that our help and salvation comes from God Almighty, not from the United States.

What is the theme of Passover?

עבדים היינו לפרעה במצרים, עתה בני חורין Avodim hayinu liparoah bamitzrayim, atoh bnei chorin We were slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt; now we’re free men

Yes, that’s it in a nutshell.  It’s derived from the Bible,

Deuteronomy Chapter 6 דְּבָרִים. This is the time we’re supposed to remember that everything, including the State of Israel, our security, economic success and more are the gifts from God.  There is no human who can save us or help us.  This Obama-worship is a danger to the Nation, the People of Israel.

Davka, now on the Eve of Passover we should be remembering that our salvation will come only from God, not the President of the United States.

Visit Shiloh Musings.

Title: Alone in Africa

Friday, November 9th, 2012

Author: Avigail Sharer
Publisher: Israel Bookshop Publications

Alone in Africa, by Avigail Sharer, is an original adventure story about three siblings named Nesanel, Penina and Chezky Feiner, who are, well, alone in Africa. Except they aren’t entirely alone – they have animals and two battling African tribes to keep them company.

It all started when the three Feiner kids were flying from home in London without their parents to visit their grandparents in South Africa. The airport-provided chaperon was a rookie teenager who didn’t know what to do when the airplane made an emergency landing in the jungle. The kids became separated from the other passengers, who were driven away by military Jeeps to the airport. That is how they became “alone in Africa.”

They were found by an African tribe named the Lulu was who thought that Nesanel was a prophet named Gift of G-d. The other children escaped, but Nesanel was kept. When Nesanel attempted to escape, his plan was foiled when he was captured by a different African tribe named the Bakayas, who were at war with the Luluwas. There was a rescue attempt by Penina and Chezky, but was it successful?

I liked Alone in Africa for a number of reasons. The plot was fast-paced and full of twists and turns; at one moment they were wandering through the jungle, the next moment they were captured. My personal favorite part of this book was the idea of a non-poisonous, poisonous frog (when you read it you’ll know). The story is also very informative about survival skills. I would recommend Alone in Africa to potential jungle explorers of ages 9-10 who are ready to tackle a chapter book of over 230 pages.

Bumped!

Friday, November 2nd, 2012

Rabbi Feld headed out to the airport early in the morning. He was flying to the wedding of one of his congregants, Mr. Krauss, who had purchased him a complimentary ticket. Although the wedding was scheduled for late afternoon, they had booked an early flight to allow ample time.

After checking in, Rabbi Feld sat in the boarding lounge, learning his Daf. Across the lounge, he noticed Rabbi Dayan waiting for the same flight. Rabbi Feld went over and introduced himself.

“I’m heading to a wedding in Chicago,” said Rabbi Feld. “By any chance, are you also attending?”

“No,” replied Rabbi Dayan. “I was invited to give a shiur.”

As the talked, an announcement came over the loudspeaker: “Continental flight 473 to Chicago is overbooked. There is an additional flight at 12 p.m. Passengers willing to be rescheduled to that flight will be granted a free round-trip ticket to anywhere that Continental flies. Please approach one of the Continental representatives near the boarding gate.”

Rabbi Feld couldn’t believe his ears. A free ticket to anywhere Continental flies! He could get a free round-trip ticket to Israel in exchange for a few hours’ delay. He looked at his watch. Even with the later flight, he should arrive at 3 p.m., just in time to make the wedding. “Should I risk it?” he thought to himself.

While he considered the issue, he further questioned: Since the family sponsored the ticket, perhaps they would be entitled to the bonus ticket? It was their money, after all.

A few people started heading over to the flight representatives. Rabbi Feld needed to make a quick decision. He turned to Rabbi Dayan and explained the situation. “Can I take the later flight?” he asked. “If I do, who gets the ticket?”

“Whether you can take the later flight depends on what you expect Mr. Krauss would want,” said Rabbi Dayan. “The bonus ticket would certainly belong to you, though.”

Rabbi Feld decided that it would be irresponsible to risk arriving late for the wedding, despite the potential gain.

“Thank you; I’ll keep the flight,” he said to Rabbi Dayan. “Now that we have some time, though, could you please explain the reason for what you said?”

“When a person gives a gift, we evaluate his intention in giving it,” said Rabbi Dayan. “Mr. Krauss clearly bought you a ticket so that you could participate in his simcha. Therefore, you should act with it in accordance with his intention. Presumably, he would not want you to arrive late for the wedding.” (See 241:5; 246:1)

“I probably would just be able to make it, unless there were unexpected delays,” said Rabbi Feld. “Is that acceptable?”

“The same principle applies,” replied Rabbi Dayan. “If Mr. Krauss would be willing for you to take the risk in light of the tremendous gain, it would be permitted. This would likely depend on whether you were asked to be the mesader kiddushin. If you were meant to lead the wedding or take an important role in the chuppah, presumably he would not be willing to have you take any risk; if you were just a guest – albeit an important one – he would probably concede.”

“What about the bonus ticket?” asked Rabbi Feld. “I know that in some cases an agent who bought something and received a bonus must share it with the sender who paid the money [C.M. 183:6]. Here, Mr. Krauss paid for the ticket.”

“Correct, but this does not apply here for a number of reasons,” said Rabbi Dayan. “First, the bonus ticket would be issued under your name. Rashi explains that the bonus is shared because we are unsure to whom the seller intended to give it, the sender who paid the money or the agent who executed the purchase. Accordingly, when the bonus is explicitly designated to the agent, he is entitled to it.” (Rama 183:6)

“But don’t some later authorities question this ruling?” said Rabbi Feld.

“Yes, and some suggest that an agent should share the bonus with the sender even if explicitly given to him,” said Rabbi Dayan. (See Be’er Heiteiv 183:21; S.A. Harav, Mechira #11) “However, the Rashba writes that if the agent received the bonus because he benefited the seller, everyone would agree that it belongs completely to the agent [Ketzos 183:7]. Here, the bonus ticket is not because of the initial purchase, but because you were willing to be bumped from the early flight.”

Woman Dies on El Al Flight

Wednesday, October 17th, 2012

An American woman died on El Al’s Tel Aviv-New York flight on Tuesday.

Medical personnel that happened to be on the flight tried to save her, but weren’t able to. She died 6 hours into the flight.

The woman’s family in New York were informed by El Al, and were waiting at the airport.

UFO Halts Ben-Gurion Airport Traffic

Wednesday, October 10th, 2012

With the military jumpy over the incursion of an enemy drone deep into Israeli airspace on Saturday, the IAF is taking no chances when they see something unusual on their radar screens, which are apparently now set at their highest sensitivity levels.

Around 5:00 AM on Wednesday morning, IAF fighter jets were scrambled over Ben Gurion Airport after IAF radar systems detected an unidentified flying object over the airport. All international flights were put on hold, and landing planes had to switch to a holding pattern as the fighter jets checked everything out.

Galei Tzahal reports that the all-clear was given a few minutes later and the planes were allowed to land.

There’s no report as to what the radar had detected.

This is the second time the IAF has scrambled fighter jets since Saturday. Earlier in week, they sent jets over Beit Shemesh, but that turned out to be nothing.

An IDF source is saying that the army would prefer to be more careful and not take extra chances.

Also, it turns out that Saturday’s F-16 had to launch two anti-aircraft missiles at the drone in order to shoot it down because of the drone’s low heat signature prevented a good lock the first time.

 

See: Related Cartoon

 

 

Religious Passengers Stranded at Ben-Gurion Over Shabbat

Saturday, September 29th, 2012

Chadarei Chaderim reports: US Airways flight number 796 from Philadelphia, landed at 4:00 on Friday afternoon, instead of the expected 2:15 PM.

The doors to the plane only opened at the terminal at 5:20 PM, and passengers arrived at the passport control at 5:30.

Rav Yochanan Chayat, the El Al rabbi was called, and he in turn called Zaka for assistance.

Zaka had passport control open a special lane for religious passengers to rush them through.

And by the time Shabbat arrived, Zaka managed to bring around 100 mattresses to the airport, and collect enough food from a number of Bnei Brak stores for the passengers who were going to be stranded in the airport over Shabbat.

The only question is, who in their right mind willingly flies on a flight that will hopefully arrive only 3 hours before Shabbat, knowing that flights get delayed all the time?

Red Hot Chili Peppers Rock Tel Aviv

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012

The “Red Hot Chili Peppers” performed in Tel Aviv on Monday night, a decade after they canceled their show due to security issues. It was the group’s first visit to Israel, and to make the most of it, the members went to the Western Wall in Jerusalem straight from the airport. The band talked about Hillel Slovak, one of their founding members, who died from a drug overdose in the early 1990s.

“Hillel Slovak forever!” band leader Anthony Kiedis shouted on stage, adding, “I must say, Hillel had his own brand of Israeli funk, pretty sure he invented it. That Israeli funkinstein.” Guitarist Flea added, “He went out to a trip in Israel, and he came back and he was so lit up and so excited and so full of love, and to come here today and think of him it’s truly a dream.” The band dedicated the song “Other Side” to the city of Haifa, where Slovak was born.

Slovak is not the only Jewish connection of the Peppers. Current guitarist Josh Klinghoffer is Jewish, and is related to Leon Klinghoffer, the elderly man in a wheelchair who was murdered by terrorists aboard the Achille Lauro in 1985.

Pro-Palestinian groups in Lebanon, where the band performed just a few nights before, were outraged about the Peppers’ decision to perform in Israel, and even threatened the opening acts in Beirut to not perform, causing one of the bands to cancel. Peppers’ drummer Chad Smith tweeted earlier this week: “In any city of any country we play … Our sole purpose is to uplift people thru our music. Nothing more. Nothing less … that’s it.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/red-hot-chili-peppers-rock-tel-aviv/2012/09/12/

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