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April 17, 2014 / 17 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Am Shalem’

Poll of Polls: Likud Beitenu at 34, HaBayit HaYehudi up to 14.5

Monday, January 7th, 2013

The average of last week’s nine polls ( Dec 30 2012 – Jan 5 2012) (Channel 2/Yediot Achronot, Knesset Channel, Maariv, Yisrael Hayom, Haaretz, Walla, Reshet Bet, Jerusalem Post/Globes, Yisrael Post/Sof Shavua), with current Knesset seats in [brackets], and the average of the polls from two weeks ago in (brackets):

34.0 (34.8) [42] Likud Beitenu

17.1 (17.1) [08] Labor

14.5 (13.5) [05] Bayit Yehudi (Jewish Home/National Union)

10.5 (11.2) [10] Shas

9.5 (9.2) [07] Movement (Livni)

9.4 (9.5) [---] Yesh Atid

5.7 (6.1) [05] Yahadut Hatorah/UTJ

4.4 (4.3) [03] Meretz

4.0 (4.0) [04] Hadash

3.8 (4.1) [04] Ra’am-Ta’al

3.3 (2.6) [03] Balad

1.6 (1.4) [02] Strong Israel

1.1 (0.4) [21] Kadima

0.6 (1.0) [01] Am Shalem

—- (0.0) [05] Independence (No longer running)

67.1 (68.1) [65] Right-Religious 52.8 (51.8) [55] Center-Left-Arab Changes from week 12 to week 13: Movement passes Yesh Atid for 5th place.

Hadash passes Ra’am-Ta’al for 9th place.

Kadima passes Am Shalem for 13th place.

Largest Gains: Bayit Yehudi gained 1 seats and Kadima gained 0.7 of a seat. Biggest Losses: Likud Beitenu lost .8 of a seat and Shas lost 0.7 of a seat.

Visit Knesset Jeremy.

Latest Israel Election Polls

Friday, November 23rd, 2012

The following poll result were reported on the Knesset TV Channel, after the Cease Fire announcement:

  • Likud: 33
  • Labor: 24
  • Bayit Yehudi:  13
  • Yesh Atid:  11
  • Shas: 10
  • Yahadut HaTorah:  6
  • Meretz:  6
  • Otzma LYisrael:  4 (Michael Ben-Ari and Aryeh Eldad)
  • Am Shalem: 3
  • Balad:  3

Atzmaut (Ehud Barak), and Kadima (Shaul Mofaz) don’t pass the minimum level of votes to get any seats.

Likud has dropped since before the Gaza operation, when they were between 40-43 seats.

Weekly Israeli Poll Avg: Likud-Beteinu at 38; Labor at 22; Right would earn 69 total seats.

Sunday, November 11th, 2012

Quick Take: This week’s average shows Likud Beitenu and Labor position similar to last week. Shas gains and takes the third position while Lapid’s Yesh Atid drops and falls into the fourth position. Hadash passes Meretz, while Kadima and Independence pick up gains. Am Shalem is also picking up steam. The right block gains ground this week with the help of Shas and Am Shalem’s gains.

Knesset Jeremy Weekly Average #5 (week of Nov 5-Nov 11) of 3 polls (Panels, two Maagar):

Current Knesset seats in [brackets], Week 4 average in (brackets)

38.0 (38.0) [42] Likud Beitenu

22.3 (22.1) [08] Labor

13.0 (11.7) [10] Shas

11.0 (14.7) [--] Yesh Atid

9.0 (9.1) [07] National Union-Jewish Home

5.6 (5.8) [05] Yahadut Hatorah/UTJ

3.6 (4.0) [04] Hadash

3.6 (3.0) [01] Am Shalem (polled in all 3 this week)

3.3 (4.2) [03] Meretz

3.3 (3.7) [04] Ra’am-Ta’al

3.0 (3.1) [03] Balad

2.3 (1.7) [28] Kadima

1.6 (0.5) [05] Independence

69 (66.3) [65] Right 51 (53.6) [55] Center-Left

Visit KnessetJeremy.com.

Jewish Press Radio with Yishai Fleisher: From the Knesset

Monday, May 28th, 2012

From the Knesset

(((CLICK BELOW TO HEAR INTERVIEW)))

In observance of Yom Yerushalayim, the Managing Editor of the Jewish Press Online, Yishai Fleisher, presents an inspiring talk that he recently gave at the Israeli Knesset for AmShalem, a political organization dedicated to restoring a moderate, embracing, and Zionistic view to Judaism. Yishai talks about his move to Jerusalem from Beit El, the history and views that surround his apartment in Jerusalem, and the importance of all of Jerusalem to the entire Jewish People. In addition to Yishai’s speech at the Knesset, a speech by Michael Fruend, founder and chairman of Shavei Israel, an organization dedicated to bringing Jews from such far-reaching places as India and China home to Israel. These speeches are engaging and inspiring, listen in!

A New Party With An Old Platform For An Old-New Land

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012

Chaim Amsalem, a current member of Knesset and former member of Shas, is in the midst of establishing yet another Israeli political party, called Am Shalem. Though the Israeli polity already maintains a dizzying array of political factions, whose platforms traverse the many social and political cleavages of the nation, Rabbi Amsalem and his followers have built a unique movement around one of the most basic and most grossly overlooked aspects of Israeli society: national unity, civic equality and a moderate religious elite.

A well-established figure in Shas, and the only one of its members to hold rabbinic ordination from the Rabbanut HaReishit, Rabbi Amsalem was expelled from Shas earlier this year, after breaking ranks with the political aides of the party’s indomitable premier, Rabbi Ovadia Yosef. Rabbi Amsalem’s rupture with Shas followed in the wake of several years of reciprocal discontent, as both Amsalem and Shas’s elite came to the mutual understanding that the party was not representative of the man, while the man was no longer representative of the party. Rabbi Dov Lipman – a leading member in Am Shalem who, should the party gain enough seats to be admitted to the Parliament, would be the first American Member of Knesset to have made aliyah as an adult – explained that the Algerian-born Amsalem initially believed that Shas represented the “crown of Israel’s Sephardic political establishment,” but he eventually grew increasingly discontented with the Party’s emergence as merely “another arm of the other Lithuanian haredi parties who are pushing the haredi community further to the extreme.”

Following his dismissal from Shas for his views against the community’s high levels of unemployment and his vocal opposition to the party’s hard stance against the halachic conversions of unquestionably loyal Jews with patrilineal lineages, Amsalem sought out a party whose platform looked to establish national unity and domestic development. Over the past number of years, Amsalem has written extensively in favor of these types of conversions citing the halachic principles of Zera Yisrael as support for his views. (Zera Yisrael mandates that Jews with ambiguous heritage, many of whom have served in the IDF, should still be included in the broader Jewish community if they seek proper conversion and demonstrate fidelity to the religion and the people.) Yet, while Israel’s roughly seven-and-a-half million people are served by a dozen distinct political parties that hold seats in the Parliament, Amsalem could not find a single party which called for the broad reforms that he deemed critical to Israel’s continued social development. Though other political factions have tried and overwhelmingly failed to curb extremism within the haredi community, Amsalem believes that his years of leadership in the religious community will enable him to succeed where others had not.

MK Rabbi Haim Amsalem (right) receiving the Quality Leadership Award for 2011, with Rabbi Dov Lipman.

Rabbi Dov Lipman explained that many within Israel’s political elite focus their attention towards foreign issues such as national security and the peace process. In the meantime, the nation’s social foundation has decayed from within, with religious and secular Jews being more ideologically divided than ever. According to Amsalem, at the forefront of national discord is the increased radicalization of the haredi establishment that has overwhelmingly shirked its civic responsibilities since the founding of the State. Entire haredi communities dedicate themselves exclusively to religious study, remain unemployed and rely solely on government welfare for subsistence. Furthermore, most within these communities abstain from compulsory national service, a staple of Israel’s social fabric.

Over the years, Rabbi Amsalem has grown increasingly discontented with this long standing status-quo and has resolved that his political future be dedicated to rectifying these dangerous social inequities. Therefore, in its dedication to national unity, the Am Shalem Party will assume a very unique identity within the Israeli polity as a party that will join in coalition with any party that achieves premiership. Am Shalem does not represent a special interest constituency, and unlike other parties it will not look to push forward the agendas of any individual political position, Amsalem has said. Instead, Am Shalem and its leaders will join with any party in government to advocate for legislation that will strengthen national unity and secure Israel’s social foundation for its posterity.

Though Amsalem initiated the development of the party while still occupying the upper echelon of Israel’s political hierarchy, at its foundation Am Shalem is a social movement. It is this identity that Am Shalem’s founding fathers cleave to, as both a practical and ideological impetus for the party’s continued development. Rather than campaigning in the traditional sense, Amsalem and Lipman have publicized their platform on the streets of Beit Shemesh, where national and religious disunity and the lack of a greater collective Israeli identity has littered the headlines of newspapers worldwide. Amsalem maintains that his calls for increasing the employment rates within the haredi population, enforcing compulsory national service, passing legislation that would encourage the establishment of haredi schools that would teach secular studies, and calling for the modernization of the rabbinic gentry are views that are espoused both throughout Israeli society and by most within the haredi community.

Building Bridges To Save A City And A Nation

Thursday, January 19th, 2012

Yes, it is true. I, a haredi with right-wing political leanings, stood on the same stage with representatives of Yisrael Chofshit, Hitorirut Yerushalayim, and Meretz – three secular and very left wing groups – at the massive rally in Beit Shemesh on the last night of Chanukah. I have received a lot of criticism for doing so but I maintain it was not only the right thing to do, it was the only thing to do to save our city.

I could have focused on the issues that separate me and most other residents of Beit Shemesh from those groups and not worked together with them. However, history has shown that if Jews had not been willing to put aside ideological differences to unite around the things we agree upon, we would not have a state of Israel, we would not have a functional government, and the Jewish people would be doomed for destruction. And Beit Shemesh would be in real trouble.

The Talmud is very clear that just as people’s faces are different, so are their ideologies. God created the Jewish people as twelve tribes, each with its own perspectives and focus. Our challenge is to find a way to put those differences aside and work together to achieve progress and success. How did Agudat Yisrael join together with the vehemently anti-religious communists to sign Israel’s Declaration of Independence? How did the Allies join with the Russians to defeat the Nazis? The answer is simple: necessity. The Nazis needed to be defeated so enemies joined together to do it. The Jews needed a homeland so Jews from all backgrounds united to make it happen.

Residents of Beit Shemesh had two pressing issues on the table as of just a few weeks ago. First, extremists were causing trauma to little girls through their verbal assaults, and police refused to arrest them because “it was just words.” Second, the national government was in cahoots with local authorities to build future neighborhoods for haredim alone. (No one is against construction for haredim. The issue is not building for the rest of the city’s many other populations as well). These were real threats to our city’s present and future.

We had to do something to turn the tide. As a result of our partnering with secular and left-wing groups to organize a nationally televised rally, both issues were brought to the national agenda. Now, because of our efforts, the police have committed to arrest anyone who merely screams at a girl. The national government now wants to work with us to build future neighborhoods for all populations. If I and other rally organizers are labeled “foolish” or “naïve” for joining in a coalition that helped bring about this success, I wear those appellations with pride.

Religious extremism in Israel needs to be dealt with – now. All Jews must unite to remove this threat to our country’s future. We must proactively work to transform Israel in this realm before we can reach our full potential. Along with the negative e-mails and messages I have been receiving for my activism these past few weeks, I have been touched by the outpouring of support from both moderate haredim and secular Israelis who have thanked me for taking on this challenge and doing what is right. So those who are closed-minded and not willing to join forces with other groups can remain at home while complaining about our problems. The rest of us will join together to save your country.

I must add one more point. I have been stunned at the venom with which people have written about these “left wing” and “anti-religious” groups. Have those critics ever taken the time to actually talk to representatives of these groups? Yes, I disagree with these groups about many fundamental ideas but sitting with them during the planning of the demonstration taught me so much.

I was always told these groups were “anti-religion” and posed the greatest danger to Orthodox Jews being able to continuing worshiping God in Israel. But in sitting and talking to them, it became clear that this was simply not the case.

First of all, many of them are the nicest young people I have ever come across. They sincerely wish to make Israel a better country. But beyond that, even on the level of ideology, their very liberalism actually dictates that no one be told what to do and that everyone be able to worship as he or she chooses.

They are not out to stop the religious from observing Shabbat, kashrut, etc. They simply want us to back off and not tell them what to do – a reasonable request. The proof of all this is what was said or not said during the rally. There was not one anti-haredi or anti-religious sentiment expressed.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/building-bridges-to-save-a-city-and-a-nation-2/2012/01/19/

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