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July 25, 2014 / 27 Tammuz, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Amman’

PM Netanyahu Debunks Peace Deal Claim: ‘Peres Had No Deal With PA’

Wednesday, May 7th, 2014

The Prime Minister’s Office came out swinging in an overnight Independence Day statement Yom HaAtzma’ut, bluntly denying that President Shimon Peres ever reached a final status deal with Palestinian Authority Chairman Mahmoud Abbas.

The statement, reported overnight by Voice of Israel government radio, denied a claim by the president reported earlier in the day that he had reached an agreement with the Ramallah-based PA chairman three years ago.

“The only one Abbas has reached an agreement with is with [the Gaza-based terrorist organization] Hamas,” commented the PMO.

President Peres had told Israel’s Channel 2 TV in an interview over the holiday that three years ago he reached a deal in principle after four meetings abroad with Mahmoud Abbas. However, he said it was scotched by Prime Minister Netanyahu, who nixed the agreement just prior to what was to be a fifth and final meeting in Amman.

The president said Mr. Netanyahu told him to wait because Quartet Middle East envoy Tony Blair, a former UK prime minister also involved in talks with the PA, might bring to the table a better offer. “But the days passed and that deal never materialized,” Mr. Peres lamented.

Israel’s president – whose position is primarily ceremonial and traditionally not intended to be functionary – said his own discussions had been about land swaps and total land mass rather than boundary lines. Maps had not yet been drawn, the president said, reported the Independent Media Review and Analysis, IMRA.

Cancelling the fifth meeting, he allegedly told the PA Chairman in August 2011, “I’m sorry, but the government doesn’t accept what we have negotiated and there’s nothing more I can do.”

The “secret” talks were never secret, however, and there is some question over how far the president’s diplomatic authorization supposedly reached.

President Peres, who was the architect of the failed Oslo Accords, is expected to retire next month as he reaches the age of 90 after a political career of seven decades.

Meanwhile, Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon is meeting today with the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Security Committee as lawmakers review the current security situation.

On the agenda are all recent events, including those of the ‘price tag’ incidents, ‘David the Nahlawi’ and the attacks in Judea and Samaria that followed the cessation of final status talks between Israel and the Palestinian Authority.

Kerry to Meet Abbas in Amman in Bailout Bid for Peace

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry set off this morning for the Jordanian capital to meet Palestinian Authority Chairman Mahmoud Abbas in hopes of heading off a diplomatic disaster. State Department spokesperson Jen Psaki told reporters in Europe the goal of the meeting is to “continue to narrow the gaps between the parties.”

Kerry is on a mission to convince Abbas to reverse his position that he has no intention of continuing negotiations with Israel over the U.S. sponsored “framework agreement.”

Nine months of negotiations for a final status agreement have resulted in little more than Israel’s release of 78 PA terrorists and the opening of more roadblocks at pivotal points leading to Arab cities along major arteries in Judea and Samaria as a “good will gesture” to jump start the talks.

No significant negotiations have taken place since November 2013 despite the move.

Abbas made his position clear at the Arab League summit yesterday in Kuwait, saying the PA did not need new agreements that would be “buried” by Israel through reservations and preconditions. The PA leader has continued to maintain his insistence that Israel pull back to the 1949 Armistice line. Both the PA and the Arab League have refused to recognize Israel as a Jewish State – a red line for Israel in the negotiations – and both insist the PA create its desired independent state on “all the territories that were occupied in 1967.”

Saudi Jailed for 15 Years for Trying to Spy for Israel

Sunday, July 14th, 2013

A Saudi court has sentenced a man to 15 years in jail for offering to spy for Israel while he was visiting Jordan, Saudi Arabia media reported Sunday. He allegedly went to the Israeli embassy in Amman to “offer them to cooperate with Israel and provide them with any information they want about Saudi Arabia.”’

The hearing and sentence did not reveal how the man was arrested and if he actually met Israeli diplomats.

The court rejected a demand from prosecutors that the man, who was not identified, be sentenced to death. “The judge refused the prosecutor’s plea on the grounds that deterring the defendant can be done without bloodshed. The judge also banned the defendant from travelling outside Saudi Arabia for 15 years,” Arar Arabic language daily said.

Violence in Jordan

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

Al Jazeera is reporting major civil unrest in Jordan, with citizens attacking police stations and public offices throughout the country.

The report claims the violence is due to high fuel prices.

One armed man was killed and several policemen injured when gunmen stormed a police station in the north of the country Wednesday night.  Another police officer was critically wounded when angry men with automatic rifles overtook a police station north of Amman.

Close by, protesters torched a civil affairs office.

Unarmed protesters also took to the streets in Amman, with up to 1,000 people facing off against riot police who fired tear gas into the crowd.  Twice as many protesters chanted “and caused property damage 140km south of Amman in Karak.

Jordan’s King Abdullah ‘Playing With Fire’

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

Muslim thugs in Jordan last weekend attacked a large group of young men and women who had gathered at a coffee shop in Amman to celebrate Halloween.

The thugs were members of the Muslim Brotherhood organization and the Salafi group.

The assailants claimed that the party was being held by “worshippers of the devil” and said Halloween was in violation of the teachings of Islam.

The attack is seen as yet another sign of the growing power of Muslim fundamentalists in Jordan.

If the Jordanian authorities cannot provide security for a Halloween party, how will they be able to prevent radical Muslims from taking over the kingdom in the future?

The “Arab Spring,” which has seen the rise of Islamists to power in a number of Arab countries, has emboldened Jordan’s Muslim Brotherhood and Salafi followers.

These two radical groups have hijacked Jordan’s pro-reform campaign and are doing their utmost to undermine the monarchy.

The two groups seek to establish an Islamic regime in Jordan that would one day participate in the “big jihad” to eliminate Israel.

The Salafi group in Jordan has dispatched dozens of terrorists to neighboring Syria to take part in the jihad [holy war] against Bashar Assad’s regime. And this is happening under the watchful eye of the Jordanian security establishment.

Hundreds of Jordanian jihadis are believed to fighting alongside the anti-Assad forces in Syria together with Muslim fundamentalists from all around the world.

Mahmoud Abdel Al, 33, a Jordanian car mechanic and father of five who belonged to the Salafi group, carried out a suicide bombing in Syria last week, according to his proud family.

His mother, Hind, told the French news agency AFP that her son was very religious and had studied the Quran from the age of 10.

“He loved jihad,” she said. “When he was a child he wanted to go to the West Bank to fight, but I prevented him. But when he grew up I told him, ‘May Allah facilitate your mission and be satisfied with you, my son.’”

The suicide bomber could not have travelled to Syria to carry out his “holy” mission without the knowledge of the kingdom’s powerful General Intelligence Department.

The Jordanian authorities believe that as long as the Muslim terrorists are going elsewhere to carry out their attacks, there is nothing to worry about.

But there is no doubt that the same jihadis who are crossing the border into Syria will one day come back to fight against King Abdullah and his regime.

Instead of taking serious measures against the terrorists, Jordan’s King Abdullah is doing the exact opposite.

The king, who is already facing widespread criticism for failing to implement real reforms and combat corruption, has begun to flirt with the Salafi group in a desperate bid to win its sympathy.

By flirting with these fundamentalists, King Abdullah is also hoping to win them to his side in his confrontation with the kingdom’s popular and influential Muslim Brotherhood.

Last week, in a surprise move, the king pardoned five Salafi terrorists who had planned to carry out a series of attacks against Jordanians and Western diplomats and nationals.

Sources in Amman said that King Abdullah was also planning to release Mohammed Dumus, a Salafi terrorist who murdered an American diplomat in Amman in 2003.

The king, however, backtracked at the last minute to avoid an angry response from the US, the sources said.

The king’s efforts to appease the Muslim fundamentalists will only play into the hands of Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafis.

As one Jordanian political analyst put it, “Our king is playing with fire.”

The Muslim thugs would not have dared to attack the Halloween party if they thought that the Jordanian authorities would respond in a tough manner.

Muslim Brotherhood and Salafi thugs today feel secure enough to impose their will on any Jordanian. By releasing convicted terrorists from prison, the king is encouraging his rivals to pursue their efforts to destabilize the kingdom and create an Islamic state in Jordan.

Originally published at the Gatestone Institute.

Regards from Amman: The Tamimi Family and the Good Life

Wednesday, June 27th, 2012

Ahlam Tamimi was a newscaster on Palestinian television, on a channel assigned by Israel, broadcast from the tall antennas of Ramallah handed over by Israel to the PA in the Oslo Accords. On August 9, 2001, Tamimi started another career, and drove a suicide terrorist into Jerusalem. She equipped him with explosive belts, brought him to Cafe Sbarro, coached him on positioning himself among the dining families in that bustling venue, and asked that he give her fifteen minutes so that she could leave.

She quickly returned to Ramallah, seated herself in the television studio, and reported the awful terrorist attack that she herself had masterminded.

Tamimi never expressed any regret. When she first learned from a journalist who was interviewing her in jail that she had murdered eight children, not just three, she just smiled broadly and continued with the interview.

After receiving life sentences for the fifteen people she had killed, Tamimi went on to become a star in an Israeli film called The Security Prisoners (Habitchoniyim). The producer explained to us that he showed such sympathy for the terrorist in their interactions because the whole point of the film was to create a revolution in the image of terrorists, so that they would be released when peace came. He had no idea how fast she and another 1,026 terrorists would be freed in reality.

This month the story reached its happy ending, at least as far as Tamimi is concerned—and a sad ending for the families of those she helped murder. Most people don’t know it, but during the time terrorists are in jail, the big-hearted State of Israel sometimes permits them to marry. Ahlam Tamimi married another member of the murder organizations by the name of Nizan Tamimi, who had participated in the murder of Chaim Mizrahi of Bet El.

Mizrahi was murdered by people with whom he had regular business dealings. They were such buddies that when one of them asked to have his picture taken with Mizrahi’s gun, he just took out the magazine, gave him the gun, and took a picture of him. That was the last picture Mizrahi ever took. They grabbed him by the hands and feet and stabbed him to death.

Nizan also was released in the Schalit Deal. However, the authorities refused to allow him to follow his wife, who was expelled to Jordan. Still, this didn’t stop him from trying his luck with repeated requests for family reunification until he finally got his way.

This story didn’t get to you because news producers and editors ignored it. We tried to explain to them that this is a serious blow to the feelings of the bereaved families and to moral principles, not to mention a violation of the Victims’ Rights Law. We explained that the Ministry of Justice didn’t even inform the families and that Netanyahu’s office, which had been so sensitive to the feelings of the Schalit family and the media, didn’t respond to the letter sent by attorney Arnold Roth, whose daughter Malki was murdered at Sbarro.

So why did they ignore the story? One typical answer that we received: It’s true that they killed sixteen Israelis, who can’t ever be reunited with their own families, but what good will revenge do? Why should we begrudge them the opportunity to build a new life together after spending so long in prison? Besides, coming after the wholesale release of terrorists from jail, this is nothing.

Following that, we went to the security establishment to get answers. Why had they changed their minds and let Nizan go to Jordan? The answer we received is that in the present situation, it is preferable that he be in Jordan, as the criminal had taken steps to return to terrorism.

Then why don’t you put him back in jail? The release of terrorists in the Schalit Deal had conditions attached to it to let the authorities return recidivist terrorists to jail to serve the remainder of their original sentences!

The answer to that was even more informative.

You know how it is, our interlocutors said. We can’t reveal our sources and sometimes we can’t even reveal our evidence. The only option is to request administrative detention….

Jordan’s King Abdullah Needs to Wake Up – Fast

Monday, February 13th, 2012

Facing growing criticism over lack of reforms and transparency, Jordan’s King Abdullah has announced an unprecedented crackdown on corruption, sending a number of his former top government officials to prison.

But the clampdown has only increased the appetite of the Jordanians, who continue to press for harsher measures against senior officials suspected of embezzling public funds and abusing their powers.

The king’s hitherto unsuccessful attempts to appease the protesters are designed first and foremost to prevent the Arab Spring from infiltrating the kingdom.

For the past several months, Jordan has witnessed weekly demonstrations calling for far-reaching reforms and an end to financial corruption. Most of the protests have been initiated by the kingdom’s powerful Muslim Brotherhood organization.

At the beginning, King Abdullah did not take the protests seriously. But when some Bedouin tribes who were known for their loyalty to the monarchy started joining the protests, the king finally began to realize that the situation in the kingdom is much more serious than he had thought.

Over the past year, King Abdullah has dismissed two governments in a bid to calm the situation, but to no avail. His recent decision to appoint Awn Khasawneh, a respected judge of the International Court of Justice, as prime minister, has also failed to put an end to the growing protests.

Although most of the protesters in Jordan have thus far avoided calling for regime change, a former parliament member broke the rules by publicly calling for toppling the monarchy.

The man, Ahmed Abbadi, was last week arrested by Jordanian security forces and is now facing up to 15 years in jail if convicted.

Abbadi hails from a powerful Jordanian tribe and his arrest has triggered street clashes between his supporters and police forces in the capital Amman.

Members of Abbadi’s tribe have vowed to stage more protests until the former lawmaker is released.

Political analysts in Amman point out that the king is desperate to restore calm and order that he has gone as far as ordering his security forces to arrest some of his most trusted and loyal officials, including the former mayor of Amman, Omar Maani, and the ex-chief of General Intelligence, Mohammed Dahabi.

The two men were arrested on suspicion of financial corruption as part of the king’s efforts to show that he is serious about reforms and transparency.

Some former prime ministers and cabinet ministers are also being questioned about their role in various corruption scandals over the past decade.

Yet all these measures have failed to convince the demonstrators that the king is indeed serious about improving the situation.

Each arrest and questioning has been followed by more demands from angry Jordanians.

Now many protesters are demanding that the king arrest Bassem Awadallah, one of his closest friends and a former minister of planning and head of the Royal Court, on graft charges.

A Jordanian journalist said that if the king continues to succumb to public pressure, “in the end he will have to fire himself.”

True, King Abdullah has taken a number of measures to fight corruption in his little kingdom. But at the end of the day, Jordan is still far from becoming a democratic country.

This is a country where the king can appoint and fire prime ministers and governments and dissolve an elected parliament any time he wishes. And this is a country where the prime minister — with the approval of the king, of course — appoints newspaper editors and senior journalists.

King Abdullah’s efforts to improve his image were recently marred by the sentencing of an 18-year-old activist to two years in prison for setting fire to a picture of His Majesty King Abdullah II.

The young man, Uday Abu Issa, was tried before a military state court, which found him guilty of “undermining the king’s dignity.”

The king would do well to realize that in the age of the Arab Spring, sending a young man to prison for burning the picture of an Arab leader will only add fuel to the fire. He also needs to understand that the rule of totalitarian autocrats in the Arab world is no longer acceptable.

If King Abdullah wants to survive, he must cede some of his powers, allow free and democratic elections for parliament and government and stop suppressing his critics. If he fails to wake up, Jordan could soon be taken over either by Islamists or the Palestinian majority.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/analysis/jordans-king-abdullah-needs-to-wake-up-fast/2012/02/13/

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