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July 25, 2016 / 19 Tammuz, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Anne Frank’

Anne Frank Sapling Cut Down, Stolen in Germany

Wednesday, December 11th, 2013

A sapling that came from the tree that stood outside the hiding place of Anne Frank in Amsterdam was cut down and stolen in Frankfurt, German police  said.

Unidentified parties cut down the 8-foot tree outside the Anne Frank School sometime between last week and Monday, according to a report Tuesday by the Dutch public broadcaster NOS. Police have no information or leads on the identity of the thieves or their motives, the report said.

The cutting was planted in 2008 outside the school named for the Jewish teenage diarist who was born in Frankfurt in 1929. Anne was killed in 1945 during the Holocaust after her family was caught hiding in the Nazi-occupied Dutch capital, where they had moved to escape persecution in Germany.

“It was, obviously, more than just a tree for us,” a spokesperson for Frankfurt’s Anne Frank School told NOS. “We grew it with the help of a landscape architect and with the loving care of several classes.”

The tree is not easily replaceable, as the original chestnut tree that stood outside Anne’s hiding place, and which is featured in her diary, was cut down in 2010 following a storm.

JTA

Anne Frank Video Game Re-Creates One Day of Hiding

Monday, October 14th, 2013

An interactive video game will allow users to relive a day in the life of Holocaust diarist Anne Frank.

The focus of the game, simply titled “Anne Frank,” is the day in October 1942 that the teenage Anne wrote in her diary about her fears that a worker was about to discover the family’s hiding place in Amsterdam, German media reported.

German video designer Kira Resari, 25, calls the game an “interactive experience” that was not meant to be “fun.” It is not yet available for sale.

“It’s more like you get carried away, touched, and perhaps moved to tears,” he told the website, adding that he “would not give away the ending.”

“I want to make a contribution toward ensuring that she is never forgotten,” he said. Resari said he wanted to contribute to ensuring that the persecution of Jews and the Holocaust never be forgotten. “Younger generations need access to history on their own wavelength,” he told the Protestant online news portal evangelisch.de.

JTA

Justin ‘Weird’ Bieber Says Anne Frank Would Have Been a Fan

Sunday, April 14th, 2013

Canadian pop singer Justin Bieber visited the Anne Frank house in Amsterdam, stayed for about an hour and wrote in the guestbook, “Truly inspiring to be able to come here. Anne was a great girl. Hopefully she would have been a belieber,” the “in” word for being one of his fans.

Frank died at the age of 15 in Bergen-Belsen concentration but her diary survived.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Google Cultural Institute Presents Jewish Content in 1st Exhibits

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

Google introduced a new online historical collection of digitized material, highlighting several Jewish themes, events and institutional partners in its first wave of exhibits.

At least 13 of the Google Cultural Institute’s inaugural collection of 42 featured exhibits consist of materials from the Anne Frank House, the Polish History Museum, the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum, Foundation France Israel and Yad Vashem.

Highlighted exhibits announced Wednesday include the testimony of Jan Karski, the World War II Polish resistance hero who tried to convince Allied leaders of the horrors of the Holocaust; as well as the saga of Edek Galinski & Mala Zimetbaum, the couple who unsuccessfully attempted to escape Auschwitz.

Visitors to Google’s new online multimedia museum can also see the last known photograph taken of Anne Frank, and browse featured historical events that include the Nuremberg Trials, the 1948 Arab-Israel War and the 1958 bombing of the Hebrew Benevolent Congregation in Atlanta.

The new resource comes one year after Google published the Dead Sea Scrolls online, the result of a partnership with the Israel Antiquities Authority.

JTA

Charge: Facebook Pages Spew Blood Libels, Attack Jews and Aborigines, Mock Anne Frank

Tuesday, September 11th, 2012

There is no scientific equation to determine what is hatred, but a Facebook picture of a smiling Anne Frank surrounded by the caption, “What’s that burning?  Oh it’s my family” is an easy one.  So is a Facebook picture of a baby on a scale emblazoned with a Jewish Star, where the bottom of the scale is a meat grinder with raw ground meat (presumably, a baby’s) oozing out.

Is there any doubt in your mind that those images constitute hate speech (one of the official categories for removal under Facebook’s Terms of Service) and should be removed from Facebook?  That was the basis for the complaints filed by the Online Hate Prevention Institute last month.

Facebook disagreed.  The pictures remain up.

The Australia-based Online Hate Prevention Institute was launched in January this year.  Its mission is to help prevent, or at least control, abusive social media behavior which constitute racism or other forms of hate speech.

Dr. Andre Oboler is the chief executive officer of OHPI.  Oboler has been involved in analyzing and monitoring online hate for five years.   In the time that he’s been monitoring Facebook, the response time has improved, but the results have not.

“OHPI submitted documented complaints following the Facebook complaint protocol, and, true to their word, we received a response within 48 hours,” Oboler told The Jewish Press.  “It’s quite amazing; the Facebook reviewers took down the images, reviewed them, and put them back up with a ‘no action’ decision within 48 hours.”

Oboler waited until the Facebook reviews were completed before posting OHPI’s findings.  The methodical process and the constructive suggestions OHPI made could be held up as models of what to do when confronted with hate speech on social media, except that at this point the diligence does not appear to have paid off.

The suggestions included:

1. Remove the offensive images

2. Close the offensive pages that are posting them

3. Permanently close the accounts of the users abusing Facebook to spread such hate

4. Review which staff assessed these examples and audit their decision making

5. Take active measures to improve staff training to avoid similar poor decisions in the future

6. To institute an appeal process as part of the online reporting system

7. To institute systematic random checks of rejected complaints

At this point, Oboler is hopeful that if sufficient attention is generated, Facebook will feel compelled to re-examine their procedures.  What he would like is for there to be a “systematic change to prevent online-generated harm in the future.”

One way to generate that attention, Oboler suggested, is for Facebook users who think the images described above are offensive to go to the Facebook OPHI site and “Like” it.  Another is to sign the OPHI petition urging Facebook to stop allowing hate speech on its site.

OHPI is also critical of the way in which Facebook has chosen to respond to complaints about offensive Facebook Pages.  Its standard response to pages that are entirely devoted to offensive material is to insert the bracketed phrase: [Controversial Humor] before the rest of the page title.  That phrase acts kind of like the warning label posted on cigarette packages.  The page remains vile, just as the cigarettes remain carcinogenic, but by slapping on the Controversial Humor disclaimer, it appears Facebook is seeking immunity from liability.  Or at least from responsibility.

OPHI discovered this Facebook method when it was engaged in an effort to eradicate hate-filled Facebook Pages dedicated to brutalizing Aborigines.  Remember – OPHI is based in Australia.  After engaging in some promising responses to OPHI’s complaints, Facebook ultimately responded that “While we do not remove this type of content from the site entirely unless it violates our Statement of Rights and Responsibilities, out of respect for local laws, we have restricted access to this content in Australia via Facebook.”

But that just doesn’t make any sense, according to Oboler.  As he pointed out, “Facebook’s ‘Statement of Rights and Responsibilities’ says at 3.7 ‘You will not post content that: is hate speech’. We find it very hard to understand how Facebook can look at this material and decide it is not hate speech. Ultimately, this is where Facebook is going wrong.”

Is there anything Facebook has determined to be sufficiently offensive that it will be removed? Yes, but not much.

Oboler explained that thus far the only hate speech kind of content that has been permanently removed by Facebook is when it is directed against an individual, rather than at an entire race or religion.  In other words, the same problem that hate speech codes on campuses have encountered, plagues complainants hoping for a non-offensive inline community.  Unless the nastiness is directed at a specific person, the default Facebook position is to not remove it.

But really, is it possible for anyone to consider the words accompanying the Anne Frank picture anything but impermissible hate speech?  Facebook apparently does and will continue to do so unless enough people tell them they are wrong.

 

Lori Lowenthal Marcus

Amsterdam Tram Employees Deny Making Fun of Anne Frank

Saturday, August 11th, 2012

Two employees of an Amsterdam tram company are denying making anti-Semitic comments about Anne Frank as their vehicle approached her former house.

An unidentified member of the Amsterdam Jewish community reported hearing the conductor of Line 17 say on Monday as the tram neared the Anne Frank House, “The Jews have to make a living somehow,” Ronnie Eisenman, chair of the Jewish Community of Amsterdam, told JTA.

He complained on Wednesday about the alleged comments to the GVB municipal transport company.

The conductor had reportedly been answering the driver, who had allegedly asked, “What are all these people doing here? That woman died a long time ago.”

The home of Anne Frank, the teenage Jewish diarist murdered during the Holocaust, drew more than one million visitors last year.

GVB announced on Friday that both employees denied having made the statements. Two days earlier, in a written announcement, GVB distanced itself from anti-Semitic statements and said the company would research the complaint.

Eisenman said that the witness, a man in his fifties, had said the statements were “very clearly heard on the intercom system.” The witness heard the conversation after the tram doors closed at the Westermark tram stop near the Anne Frank House, Eisenman said.

The witness did not see the driver and the conductor, but knew one was a man and the other a woman.

“The fact that the employees deny that such a conversation ever took place does not add to their version’s credibility,” Eisenman said.

GVB said it would invite the witness to further discuss the details of the incident.

JTA

Too Much Symbolism? South Bronx Kids Visit Anne Frank Center Betwixt Freedom Tower and Ground Zero Mosque

Monday, March 19th, 2012

Is there such a thing as too many metaphors for the triumph of the human spirit packed into one sidewalk, especially such a crowded sidewalk near Wall Street (add that, too, to the mix, wrap in an American flag and call it a day?). But I’m probably being too cynical. It’s actually a heart warming story.

The Daily news reports that the Anne Frank Center USA, on Park Place and Church St., near the Freedom Tower and the Ground Zero Mosque, opened its doors last Thursday to Holocaust survivors, guests and a class of fifth-graders from Public School 43 Jonas Bronck in Mott Haven.

The kids spread across the exhibit, examining the simulation of Anne’s bedroom, family photographs and cites from her diary on the bright orange walls. They read Anne’s diary on iPads, although some of them said they had already read it several times.

Yori Yanover

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/yoris-daily-news-clips/too-much-symbolism-south-bronx-kids-visit-anne-frank-center-betwixt-freedom-tower-and-ground-zero-mosque/2012/03/19/

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