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December 5, 2016 / 5 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Arab’

Hekdesh Benvenisti Suing to Evict 9 Arab Squatter Families from Eastern Jerusalem

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016

The Hekdesh Benvenisti submitted this week eviction suits against nine Arab families in the Kfar HaShiloah (Silwan) neighborhood in eastern Jerusalem. To date, the association has sued 72 Arab families it wants evicted, based on the fact that the entire neighborhood belongs to Yemenite residents who settled there in the early 1920s.

Kfar HaShiloah is located on the eastern slope of the Kidron Valley, above the outlet of the Gihon Spring opposite the City of David.

The Hekdesh Benvenisti is an association established in 1899 for the purpose of building the Yemenite neighborhood. According to Daniel Luria, the executive director of Ateret Cohanim-Israel, the Ateret Cohanim NGO assists the Hekdesh facilitate acquisitions in the area, which has been conducting a legal campaign against the Arab squatters who took over the Jewish-owned homes following the 1949 armistice, when the Jordanian Legion governed eastern Jerusalem. The bulk of these Arab families took over the properties in the 1950s and 60s, and today there are some 80 Arab families there.

The Hekdesh went to court after the squatters refused the offer of money to vacate the Jewish properties.

Currently there are more than 50 Jewish families living in the area, some in homes purchased from Arabs, some in Beit Yonatan, an apartment building in the neighborhood, owned by Ateret Cohanim. Last year an Arab family was evicted from what used to be the century-old Yemenite synagogue, and the building has undergone renovations, complete with a glow-at-night star of David on the rooftop. Two additional apartment buildings have been redeemed over the past year, and are also being renovated to accept future Jewish families.

The Jewish residents of the area are often attacked by the Arabs, in many cases requiring intervention by police and Jewish security personnel. The process of removing the Arab squatters promises to be lengthy, but the association expects big rewards in terms of establishing a major, thriving Jewish neighborhood in eastern Jerusalem.

In 2014, White House spokesman Josh Earnest described the new, legal occupants of Kfar HaShiloah as “individuals who are associated with an organization whose agenda, by definition, stokes tensions between Israelis and Palestinians.” Prime minister Netanyahu was “baffled” by the criticism, deeming it “un-American.”

Attorney Avraham Moshe Segal, noted that “various courts, led by the Supreme Court, have determined that the Hekdesh is the exclusive owner of these lands, and we expect that the courts’ rulings be honored precisely.”

JNi.Media

CBS: For the First Time Ever, Jewish, Arab Fertility Rates Identical

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016

An announcement by Israel’s Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) on the occasion of the International Child Day 2016 states that, for the first time since the creation of the state in 1948, Israeli Jewish women’s overall fertility rate has matched that of Israeli Arab women: 3.13 children per woman on average. This means that the Jewish demographic trend is on the upswing, while the Arab numbers are slowing down. Kindly share this by the Thanksgiving table when the issue of the “demographic time bomb” rears its predictable head.

The announcement shared a fascinating list of facts and figures on the heartwarming topic of Israeli children. Such as that by the end of 2015 there were 2.798 million children ages 0 to 17 living in Israel, constituting 33% of the population. In Jerusalem children are 40% of the general population, in Haifa 23% and in Tel Aviv only 21%.

Out of Israel’s children, 1.996 million are Jews (71.3%), 718 thousand are Arab (25.7%) and the rest, 84 thousand children (3%), are neither.

By the end of 2015, the average number of children under age 17 per household was 2.4. The largest number of children per household was in Beit Shemesh — 3.8, B’nei B’rak — 3.4, and Jerusalem — 3. The lowest number of children per household was in Bat Yam — 1.8.

Here’s another heartwarming bit of data: a whopping 92% of Israeli children live with both parents; only 8% — 210 thousand children — live with one parent, 92% of them with their mother.

How about child brides? In 2014 865 girls under the age of 17 got married, 88% of them Muslim. Then, in 2015, 216 girls under age 17 gave birth, out of whom 248 were Muslim and 58 Jewish. For 7% of those it was not their first birth.

In 2015, 200 thousand children lived in homes where no one was employed, 5.5% of the Jewish population, 14% of the Arab population.

In the Jewish year 5774 (2013/14) 10,673 criminal files were opened against children ages 12 to 18.

In 79 thousand households children were the victims of theft, violence or threat of violence, sexual violation, and cyber crime.

Economics: the average net income for a household with children was 1.3 higher than a household with no children — $55,135.32 annually, compared with $42,539.52. However, expenses for the households with children was 1.4 higher, $45,831.6 vs. $32,545.44.

JNi.Media

Little Arab Attention as Yasser Arafat Museum Inaugurated

Thursday, November 10th, 2016

The Palestinian Authority on Wednesday inaugurated the Yasser Arafat Museum in a shiny new building in the Muqata compound in Ramallah, marking the 12th anniversary of the late chairman’s death. Arafat’s successor Mahmoud Abbas, Arab League Secretary General Ahmad Abul Ghait and his predecessor Nail Al-Arabi, and former Jordanian Prime Minister Abdel Salam Al-Majali attended the opening ceremony.

Not your A-list by any stretch, and yet Ahmad Suboh, director of the Yasser Arafat Foundation, nevertheless insisted that the attendance by Abul Ghait “is a message that the Palestinian cause is still the first cause of the Arabs and is highly appreciated.”

Construction on the two-story museum began in 2010. It covers an area of 26 acres and cost close to $7 million to build. The museum features photos, looped video, explanatory texts, documents and Arafat’s personal effects, including the Nobel Peace Prize he won following the signing of the Oslo Accords between the Palestine Liberation Organization and Israel in 1993.

The museum depicts Arafat’s role in the rise of “Palestinian” nationalism as a reaction to the arrival of Zionism. However, as Isabel Kershner notes in the NY Times, “the story ends abruptly with his demise, without any conclusion, reflecting his ultimate failure in achieving his goal of Palestinian independence, whether through diplomacy or the gun.”

Nasser al-Kidwa, Mr. Arafat’s nephew and the chairman of the Yasir Arafat Foundation, told the Times “the idea is to have a cultural, educational as well as commemorative institution. We have tried to do it in as accurate a way as possible, without exaggeration or understatement.”

The museum repeated the lie that Arafat was born in Jerusalem, when he was actually born in Cairo, Egypt. Kershner doesn’t correct that error in her report.

And, speaking of understatement, Kershner reports that “Abbas seems to be featured only when unavoidable, like in a picture of the signing of the 1993 Oslo agreement on the White House lawn.” Or, as Kidwa put it, “When he was there, he was there.”

JNi.Media

Jerusalem Mayor to AG: If You Demolish Amona, Arab Homes Will Follow

Monday, November 7th, 2016

While the Supreme Court is debating a request from the Netanyahu cabinet to postpone the demolition of the Amona community in Samaria by seven months, Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat has just upped the ante on the same debate, informing AG Avichai Mandelblit that a ruling in favor of the anonymous Arab claimants in Amona would have devastating consequences for some Arab residents of Jerusalem.

According to a Channel 2 News report Sunday, Barkat sent a letter to the AG warning that the Amona ruling would create a precedence by which the sovereign power is compelled to act to prevent the theft of private land and its subsequent settlement. Barkat warned that this precedence would inevitably force his municipality to evict Arab residents from their illegal dwellings in eastern Jerusalem.

“It has been brought to my attention recently that in my city of Jerusalem there are cases which are similar in principle, whereby Arab settlement has been established on Jewish owned land in the eastern part of the city,” Barkat wrote, adding that “there are also city- and government-owned lands which have been settled by Arabs.” Presumably, the mayor refers to lands usurped by the Jordanian government after 1949.

The Mayor assured the AG that he was not eager to settle those open accounts just yet. “As you well know, the city of Jerusalem is complex religiously, nationally and judicially. As a rule I have so far directed various city components to act extra carefully and to seek consistent settlements of such land disputes to the benefit of the public at large, as much as possible. Therefore I hereby request your opinion regarding the ramifications of the Supreme Court ruling and its implementation by the Israeli government on the Jerusalem municipality, especially in the cases which I have described, which we are currently investigating in eastern Jerusalem.”

Should the AG walk into this obvious trap, anything he may say in favor of letting Jerusalem Arabs stay on their stolen Jewish land may be used against him in the high court of law.

JNi.Media

Clashes with Pro-Israel Students at Rochester’s SDS Anti-Israel Event

Monday, November 7th, 2016

The Rochester University, NY, chapter of SDS (OMG, there’s still an SDS?) has declared November “Palestinian Awareness Month,” and was promptly accused of promoting a “clear anti-Israel agenda” in a Campus Times op-ed by student Yael Schiller. That did not slow down the SDS, who scheduled a screening last Wednesday of a documentary wannabe titled “The Occupation of the American Mind: Israel’s Public Relations War in the United States,” which makes the familiar argument that the Jews who control the media use it to help Israel murder Palestinian babies before Passover (we paraphrase).

Campus Times editor Justin Trombly reported Monday (Tensions flare at Palestine awareness event) that tensions “boiled over” during a Q&A session following the screening. “What point are you trying to make?” a member of the audience demanded, among a string of frustrated people angry with the film.

A man who said his family had been forced from Libya in 1967 because they were Jewish asked, “Is this for education purposes?” He noted that he is not considered a refugee on campus because he is not Palestinian.

Later in the Q&A session, student Elie Cohen was interrupted when he described education in the Palestinian Authority regarding the kidnapping and murder of 11 Israeli athletes during the 1972 Munich Olympics by a Palestinian terrorist group. One of the moderators, Farida Ibrahim, said, “If you’re going to ask a question, you are not going to make a statement.” When Cohen tried to complete his point, Ibrahim cut him off, saying, to applause, “These panelists are here to talk about their lives. They have nothing to say to you about what the Palestinian Authority or the government has put in the textbook of Palestinians.”

Eventually, a Public Safety officer began to approach him, and so Cohen walked off. But, as Trombly noted, a similar scene took place shortly thereafter, followed by what was described as an attempt by an Orthodox Jew from the audience to confront an Israeli-American panelist.

A local SDS official confirmed his group had enlisted the Public Safety police for the event, suggesting it “had to be defensive against an offensive and potentially violent force.” That’s the Jews on campus, who obviously support those Jews who control the media.

Elie Cohen, for his part, told Trombly, “I thought it was more of an Israel-bashing ‘documentary,’ opposed to one that, ‘explains the Palestinian voice,’” he said. “I hoped that after such a video, that there would be some political discussion about the claims made (since the video was purely political propaganda), but none of that was allowed. Public Safety nearly escorted me out of the event for questioning the legitimacy of the panelist’s claim that the Palestinian schools are not forcing an anti-Israel ideology.”

The moderator, Ibrahim, told Trombly the Jewish audience’s reaction to the film “was disgusting because the only thing they had to say was about terrorism which clearly implies that this is the only thing they have to ask Palestinians or Arabs or Muslims. … And that of course has to be at our Palestine events and over the voices of Palestinian and Arab students,” she said.

SDS officials were cited by Trombly as defending the use of Public Safety officers at a campus event by blaming a “radical right-wing non-student group (Roc4Israel) prompting locals to attend the event to “balance out the hate” so that Jewish students can “feel safe.”

David Israel

The New York Times Thinks that the Jews from Arab Countries Simply “Immigrated”

Monday, October 31st, 2016

{Originally posted to the author’s website, FirstOne Through}

On October 20, 2016, the New York Times profiled a rising Israeli member of Knesset, Miri Regev.  The article, “Miri Regev’s Culture War,” highlighted her background in Israel’s “periphery,” as part of the Mizrachi or “Eastern” communities.

The Times stated that “Mizrachi” is “a catchall term that includes Jewish communities from Muslim countries in the Middle East and North Africa, as well as the Sephardic Jews, whose origins can be traced to Spain and Portugal, who settled there. These communities immigrated to Israel in mass waves after its founding in 1948 and into the early 1950s, upending its demographic makeup. The Jewish population, almost exclusively Ashkenazi, became more than 40 percent Mizrahi. But it wasn’t just the country’s ethnic composition that changed. The Jewish population that predated the founding of the state was primarily young, secular and idealistic; it was also heavily male. By contrast, the new Mizrahi arrivals tended to be large families from traditional societies. In their ethnic garb, often with no knowledge of Hebrew, they struck the native-born Israeli sabras and the European Ashkenazim as provincial and uneducated.”

Read the passage again.  It sounds like these Jews simply left the MENA {Middle East-North Africa} region because they wanted to go to the newly reestablished Jewish State after Israel was founded in 1948.  Nowhere in the article is there any sense that these Mizrachi Jews suffered any persecution by the Muslim nations. Such poor treatment was only under the elitist Ashkenazi Jews from Israel.

This was a continued insult and mischaracterization of history by the media of the over 850,000 Jews that were forcibly expelled or fled for their lives from communities that they had lived in for centuries, due to Muslims anger over the founding of the Jewish State in a place that they deemed “Arab land.

The Muslim Expulsion of the Jews

Roughly two-thirds of the Jewish refugees from the MENA region (Middle East and North Africa) went to Israel, while one-third fled to France.  France was a natural place for Jews to flee French-speaking Arab countries such as Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia.

Algeria. Pogroms in Algeria began shortly after the Palestine Mandate to reestablish a Jewish homeland took effect, killing dozens in the 1920s and 1930s. During World War II, Jews were stripped of their citizenship when Nazis took over France, As Algeria was technically part of France. The French Vichy regime was particularly harsh to Jews, stripping them of most rights and ability to work.

Even as the war ended, Muslims put in place their own anti-Jewish laws. In 1962, when Algeria declared independence from France, virtually the entire Jewish community fled, seeing the Nuremberg-type laws in Muslim countries, and the fate of Jews in the rest of the MENA region. The majority of Jews went to France, while many moved to Israel.

Egypt. Nationality Laws in 1927 and 1929 gave preference to Egyptians who were Arab-Muslim. The laws made it difficult for Jews to gain citizenship, and in 1947, it is estimated that only 10,000 of the 75,000 Jews in Egypt had citizenship, while the rest were either stateless or were foreign nationals.

Jews came under direct attack at the founding of Israel, including bombings of Jewish neighborhoods in 1948 which killed 70, and a bombing in the Cairo Jewish Quarter in 1949 that killed 34.

When the Suez War with Israel broke out in 1956, there was no more room for Jews.  On November 23, 1956, the Egyptian Minister for Religious Affairs declared that “all Jews and Zionists are enemies of the state,” as Egypt moved to expel the Jews and confiscate their property.

Iraq. In the 1920s, Jews were prohibited from teaching Hebrew or Jewish history. In July 1948, Iraq made Zionism a crime, punishable with up to seven years in jail. In October 1948, all Jews who held positions in government were fired. In May 1950, Jews in Iraq were stripped of their citizenship and the government began to seize all Jewish property.

In response to the edicts, in 1951 and 1952, Israel launched Operation Ezra and Nechemia to airlift the Jews out of the country to safety. The Jewish community in Iraq that had stood had close to 130,000 people was quickly down to a mere 3000.

After the Arab armies were defeated in another war in 1967, the remnant of Jews in Iraq would find the situation unbearable. On January 27, 1969, the government hanged nine Jews in the public square to the cheers of Iraqis. The Jewish community in Iraq was soon no more.

Libya.  Jews were attacked by Libyans in the immediate aftermath of World War II, with 140 murdered in a pogrom. The Libyan government’s Nationality Law of 1951 prohibited Jews from having Libyan passports, and Jews were no longer allowed to vote or hold public office. By 1953, Jews in the country were subject to broad economic boycotts. The community of roughly 40,000 Jews dwindled to just 6 people.

Morocco. The Jewish community in Morocco was one of the largest in the MENA region, estimated at over 250,000 people.

After Israel’s declaration of independence in May 1948, two pogroms broke out in Morocco, in the towns of Oujda and Djerrada. The attacks killed 47 people, wounded hundreds and lefts hundreds homeless. Not surprisingly, 10% of the country’s Jews quickly fled the country.

After Morocco declared independence in 1956, an Arabization of the country commenced, cutting Jews off from parts of society. At the same time, the government prohibited emigration to Israel, which lasted until 1963. In 1961, roughly 90,000 Moroccan Jews had to be ransomed in Operation Yakhnin, bringing Jews to Israel. In the aftermath of the 1967 Six Day War, another 40,000 Jews fled to Israel.

Syria. In 1947, the sale of any real estate to Jews was prohibited, Jews were discharged from public office, and in 1949, the governments seized Jews’ financial assets.  In 1950, Jews were forced to leave the farming industry.  Syrians took the message, an initiated pogroms from November 1947 through August 1949, killing many as they looted Jewish homes and stores.

As Jews fled, the country had their assets seized by the state.

More edicts would follow for the Jews that remained.  In 1967, Muslims were placed as principals of all Jewish schools. In 1973, with the onset of the Yom Kippur War, new edicts were enforced that Jews could no longer communicate with anyone outside of Syria.

Tunisia. Tunisia’s independence in 1956 led to an Islamification of society and placed Jews in a secondary dhimmi status. From that point on, all Jewish businesses were forced to take on a Muslim partner.

The old Tunis Jewish cemetery was expropriated in 1957, and the great Tunis synagogue was destroyed in 1960. As Jews began to flee the country in 1961 as they had in the rest of the MENA region, Tunisia only allowed Jews to take one dinar with them, as the country confiscated the rest of their possessions.

Yemen. Sharia law was instituted in 1913, and all Jewish orphans were forcibly converted to Islam. In the 1920s, Jews became excluded from the army and public service.

In 1947, riots in Aden killed 82 Jews, and in 1948, Yemeni Jews began to lose control of their possessions, with laws forcing Jews to transfer all crafts to Arabs before leaving the country.

As a result of the crisis, Operation Magic Carpet airlifted 49,000 Jews out of the country between June 1949 and September 1950.

TOTALS. The number of Jews that fled persecution from homes they lived in for centuries was between 850,000 and 1 million people.

  • Algeria 140,000
  • Egypt 75,000
  • Iraq 135,000
  • Lebanon 5,000
  • Libya 38,000
  • Morocco 265,000
  • Syria 30,000
  • Tunisia 105,000
  • Yemen 55,000

This total of 850,000 Jews does not include the Jews who fled Iran and Afghanistan.


Yet the New York Times chose to write that Jews “immigrated” to Israel, implying no malice on the part of Arabs, nor fear in the hearts of Jews.  The paper implies that the Mizrachi Jews sought to take advantage of the new Jewish State. Maybe for economic opportunities.

This characterization comes from the same media source that makes every effort to describe Palestinian Arabs as “refugees,” and despondent, even when they are living just a few miles from the homes where their grandparents sought to destroy the nascent Jewish state.

The New York Times has a long history of only parroting the Palestinian Arab narrative in their collective fight against Israel. It has now further chosen to whitewash the crimes of the entire Muslim Arab world that forcibly rid their nations of Jews as they robbed them of their dignity, lives and property.


Related First.One.Through articles:

The Long History of Dictating Where Jews Can Live Continues

UN Summit for Refugees and Migrants September 2016

Help Refugees: Shut the UNRWA, Fund the UNHCR

Palestinian “Refugees” or “SAPs”?

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Paul Gherkin

Exclusive: Weapons Cache Found in Arab Town following Abbas Surprise Visit

Thursday, October 27th, 2016

On Wednesday night, IDF forces, in collaboration with GSS and the Border Guard, raided the town of Azzun, about five miles east of Qalqilya and about the same distance west of Kfar Sabba inside 1948 Israel. The raid yielded a home made M16 rifle, loaded magazines, knives and binoculars (see picture).

The above news was part of an IDF press release, which is almost identical to hundreds of releases from the past 18 months, and, in fact, the weapons stash seized was a lot smaller than what has already been captured in many other such raids.

Here’s what was not mentioned in the IDF announcement: last Saturday, PA Chairman Mahmoud Abbas with his entourage made an unscheduled, uncoordinated stop at the town of Azzun. Abbas took route 55, where he is not allowed to go with his police escort without IDF permission, and then, as if on impulse, the line of official vehicles turned south on the short road leading into Azzun, leaving the IDF and Israel Police units in the area to scratch their heads in surprise.

The unusual event was not reported by the media and so no one asked what sudden business Abbas had in Azzun. But, as it happens, in addition to Azzun there are several major Jewish towns along route 55, including Karnei Shomron, Ma’ale Shomron, and Alfei Menashe, and the residents there did record the event. Which is why on Thursday morning The Jewish Press Online was bombarded with emails from those good folks Thursday morning, connecting the dots between the Abbas unexpected visit and the IDF unexpected weapons raid.

And now you, too, know.

David Israel

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/exclusive-weapons-cache-found-in-arab-town-following-abbas-surprise-visit/2016/10/27/

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