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December 9, 2016 / 9 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Ashkelon’

Fisherman’s House Discovered on Ashkelon Beach

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016

A building used by fishermen in the Ottoman period, containing fishhooks and fishing weights, was exposed in an archaeological excavation conducted in Ashkelon, north of the Gaza Strip.

Young residents of Ashkelon and the vicinity who were employed by the Israel Antiquities Authority in an archaeological excavation in the city, recently uncovered buildings that were once used by local inhabitants who were engaged in fishing along the Mediterranean coast. The excavation was carried out for the Ashkelon municipality, at the initiative of the Ashkelon Economic Company, in an area where a new neighborhood is slated to be built, in the northern part of the city.

As part of a project being led by the IAA and aimed at educating young people about their past, dozens of boys and girls were engaged in the challenging work of unearthing the coastal city’s past.

The finds that were discovered: metal fishhooks, dozens of lead weights, a large bronze bell.

The finds that were discovered: metal fishhooks, dozens of lead weights, a large bronze bell.

According to the excavation directors, Federico Kobrin and Haim Mamliya, “Two of the buildings that we uncovered are very curious, and it seems they were used as a fisherman’s house and a lookout tower, possibly a lighthouse, dating back to the Ottoman period (1299 to 1922 CE). The tower was situated on a lofty hilltop, and it looks out over the Mediterranean Sea. From the tower one could signal and direct ships that were sailing between the ancient ports in Ashkelon and Ashdod-Yam.”

Kobrin adds, “The fisherman’s house is divided into three rooms, and a wealth of artifacts was discovered in it that are indicative of its use: metal fishhooks, dozens of lead weights, a large bronze bell, and even a stone anchor. The building’s entrances were fixed in the north in order to prevent the high winds and sea storms from entering into it.” According to the archaeologists, “this is the first time that a building was exposed in Ashkelon that we can attribute with certainty to the fishing industry.”

Federico Kobrin, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, near the lookout tower.

Federico Kobrin, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, near the lookout tower.

Kobrin noted that “working with youth was both a challenge and extremely satisfying. The young people participated in uncovering part of their city’s past; they labored diligently and conscientiously, showed their interest and curiosity regarding the finds, and it was a pleasure to work with them.”

The fisherman’s house will be preserved and incorporated in the development of the neighborhood and strip of beach for the benefit of the residents and to create a connection between them and those who lived and fished there in the past.

JNi.Media

Goodnight Ashkelon

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

The sun sets over the sea, as seen from the beach in Ashkelon, on September 12, 2016.

Photo of the Day

In Case of Tsunami

Sunday, August 7th, 2016

A sign along the beach in Ashkelon pointing out where to run to in case there is a tsunami.

Photo of the Day

First Philistine Cemetery Discovered in Israel

Sunday, July 10th, 2016

By Michael Bachner/TPS

Ashkelon (TPS) – A Philistine cemetery has been discovered for the first time in Israel, possibly shedding light on the mystery of the Philistines’ origins. According to biblical accounts, the Philistines were the arch-foes of ancient Israel.

“After decades of studying what the Philistines left behind, we have finally come face to face with the people themselves,” said Daniel Master, a professor of archaeology at Wheaton College. “With this discovery we are close to unlocking the secrets of their origins.”

Archaeologists and scholars have long searched for the Philistines’ origin. Artifacts found in the cemetery, which date back 2,700 to 3,000 years, may support the biblical account of the Philistines as migrants who arrived on the shores of ancient Israel from western lands in approximately the twelfth century BCE.

“Ninety-nine percent of the chapters and articles written about Philistine burial customs should be revised or ignored now that we have the first and only Philistine cemetery found just outside the city walls of Tel Ashkelon, one of the five primary cities of the Philistines,” said Lawrence Stager, Dorot Professor of the Archaeology of Israel at Harvard University.

The discovery was made by the Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon more than thirty years after the excavation began. The digs that took place in Ashdod, Ekron, Ashkelon, and Gath have shown how culturally distinct the Philistines were from their Israelite contemporaries.

Philistine burial practices were not like those of the Bronze Age Canaanites, nor were they similar to burial practices in later Iron Age Judea. The Philistines buried their dead primarily in pits that were dug for each deceased individual: male or female, adult or child. Later, more bodies were sometimes placed in the same pit, which was dug again along roughly the same lines, but the new remains were interred with their own grave goods. The cemetery was also found to contain evidence of cremations, together with pit interments and multi-chambered tombs.

After quelling Bar Kochba’s revolt in the Roman province of Judaea in 135 CE, Emperor Hadrian renamed the area Syria Palaestina, for the Israelites’ ancient enemies.

Research on artifacts found at the site, including bones, ceramics, jewelry and weapons, may connect the Philistines to related populations elsewhere in the Mediterranean Basin. Bone samples taken from the site are also being tested in order to ascertain the Philistines’ origins.

Most of the items found in the graves were storage jars, small bowls, and decorated juglets filled with what is believed to have been perfumed oil. While bracelets and earrings were found upon some of the remains and weapons with others, most of the individuals seem not have been buried with personal items.

The discovery was made in Ashkelon, a key port and maritime trade center from the Bronze Age to the Crusades, when it was destroyed and left uninhabited until modern times.

The excavation was organized and sponsored by the Leon Levy Foundation; the Semitic Museum at Harvard University; Boston College; Wheaton College; and Troy University, under license from the Israel Antiquities Authority and the Israel Nature and Parks Authority.

TPS / Tazpit News Agency

Israeli Lifeguard Discovers 900 Year Old Oil Lamp During Beach Run

Monday, June 27th, 2016

By Naomi Altchouler/TPS

Ashkelon (TPS) – An Israeli lifeguard found a candle estimated to be about 900 years old during a morning run on the beach in Tel Ashkelon National Park in southern Israel last Tuesday.

“During the run I saw some planks washed up from the sea, and I stopped to pick them up”, lifeguard Meir Amshik said. “Suddenly, I saw part of the new cliff deteriorating. I made my way there and saw the intriguing candle lying there in its entirety. I thought it might be an antique, so I picked it up. I went back to the lifeguard’s tent and together with Avi Panzer, director of the lifeguard station, we contacted the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA).”

“The ancient oil lamp, which served as a light source, is dated to the 12th century AD (early Crusader period),” said Sa’ar Ganor, IAA archaeologist of the Ashkelon district. “You can really see the signs of wear and soot on the mouth. The candle was discovered as a result of receding coastal cliff, battered by the seasonal forces of nature.”

“The candle represents part of the cultural richness of the ancient city of Ashkelon, which was a city of commerce,” Ganor explained. “In Ashkelon, the port’s function is to import goods from the sea, as well as to export manufactured goods from all parts of southern Israel. In Ashkelon Coast National Park you can find evidence of preserved life starting from the Canaanite period 4000 years ago, until the modern era.”

Guy Fitoussi, of the IAA’s Robbery Prevention Unit, praised the lifeguard for reporting the ancient treasure.

“The lifeguards of NPA and lifeguards as a rule, are our eyes on the beach. They are not just saving people, but even antiques,” he said. “People must understand ancient fossils they find in the case, belong to the state and the general public. This finding could be very valuable for research and historical knowledge for all of us. Fortunately, more and more people report finding antiques “.

Amshik, for his part, is thrilled to be involved in this historic discovery.

“Finding such a treasure, it is very exciting,” he said. “Just to feel a part of history, It fulfills a sense of appreciation for what was here before. It feels like being a link in the chain.”

TPS / Tazpit News Agency

Four Tel Aviv Terror Shooting Attack Victims Identified

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

Police have released the names of the four new Israeli terror victims murdered Wednesday night by Palestinian Authority Arab gunmen in Tel Aviv.

Among the dead were Ramat Gan resident Ido Ben Ari, 41; Tel Aviv resident Ilana Neve, 39; Michael Feige, 58, a doctor from Midreshet Ben-Gurion and Mila Mishayev, 33, of Rishon Lezion.

Mishayev, who is from Ashkelon, was responsible for the care of her two parents, two brothers and one sister, according to a statement by a city spokesperson.

Social workers from the city’s department of social services were at the family home on Thursday morning to render whatever assistance is needed, the spokesperson said. Funeral details have yet to be set.

“We will provide as much help as we can to the family,” said Ashkelon Mayor Itamar Shimoni. “May they know no more sorrow, and may G-d avenge the blood of the victims of this shooting attack. We all send our best wishes for a speedy recovery to the injured.”

Hana Levi Julian

Report: Ashkelon Terrorist Was ISIS Supporter

Thursday, February 25th, 2016

A terrorist who stabbed a soldier in Ashkelon earlier this month turns out to have been a Sudani supporter of Da’esh (ISIS).

Kamal Aysh Aziz Hassan Mohammed, 32, was a Sudanese citizen who infiltrated into Israel a number of years ago, according to the findings of a joint investigation by the Israel Security Agency (Shin Bet) and Israel Police Southern District.

Among other factors, the investigation revealed the attacker was a devout Muslim and that his mobile phone contained photos of various Da’esh (ISIS) operatives from around the world. His attack that day apparently was fueled by inspiration from Da’esh.

On February 7, Mohammed stabbed an IDF soldier at the intersection of Ben Gurion Boulevard and British Jewry in Ashkelon.

After the attack, Mohammed escaped, fleeing into a residential neighborhood.

A second soldier saw the stabbing and immediately ran after the suspect, who fled, but was chased down and then shot by his pursuer who had quickly closed the distance and neutralized him.

Mohammed was seriously wounded in the incident, and later died of his wounds at Ashkelon’s Barzilai Medical Center.

It turns out he had a record of violent crimes in Israel, separate and apart from whatever he might have done in his country of origin before infiltrating the Jewish State.

Mohammed was arrested in 2009 on suspicion of involvement in violent crimes; he also escaped from the Holon facility in 2014 and since that time has lived in Ashdod and Ashkelon. It seems that the attack was inspired by the Da’esh terror organization.

The findings were released as part of the joint investigation by the Israel Security Agency (Shin Bet) and the southern district Israel Police.

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/report-ashkelon-terrorist-was-isis-supporter/2016/02/25/

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