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December 4, 2016 / 4 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘banned’

Austrian Rightwingers Banned from Café Say It’s the Holocaust All Over Again

Tuesday, April 26th, 2016

This entire report should be read in the context of what happened in Austria last Sunday, when Norbert Hofer of the anti-immigrant Freedom Party (FPÖ) came a clear first with 35% in the first round of the national presidential election. The president of Austria’s authority is the same as that of the president of Israel and they both are modeled after the British queen, but still, it is a huge gain for the right in the land that gave us Mozart but then followed with Hitler. Hofer will face Alexander Van der Bellen of the Austrian Green Party in the second round on May 22.

Eva Trimmel, owner of the Fett und Zucker cafe in Vienna’s Leopoldstadt by Trimmel, has barred FPÖ supporters from her establishment following their party’s unprecedented success in Sunday’s Presidential election, The Local reported. When Trimmel opened for business on Monday, she wrote on the menu board on the sidewalk that customers who are “part of the 35%” should go look for another café. And below that exclusionary message she added the hashtag #rightwingNOTwelcome.

Fett und Zucker Café

Fett und Zucker Café

Now, as we hinted above, there’s a big difference between rightwing Jewish politics, or GOP politics, and Austrian rightwing politics, obviously because Austria in the past provided Germany with some of its best Nazis. So that when Austrians are voting right, even when they’re doing it in a justified response to the Muslim influx that’s been overwhelming all of Europe, Jews and other folks with long memories get just a tad concerned.

Critics of Eva Trimmel have compared her action to the Nazis excluding Jews from public spaces and from various establishments. One commentator, Philipp K, wrote on Trimmel’s Facebook post: “The same as 70 years ago! Then Jews were not allowed to go in, and now it’s [FPÖ] voters!”

Trimmel responded: “I have positioned Fett und Zucker as a queer-feminist, anti-racist café. I want no people with right-wing points of view to come in.”

OK, so she’s on the obnoxious side, intolerant and probably forgets your order and serves your cappuccino either tongue-searing hot or tepid, and her cupcakes must be stale. Nevertheless, barring voters she doesn’t like is still short of marching them to the nearest train station for a one-way trip to Poland.

Are Europeans really this bad with proportionality all the time?

JNi.Media

Bearded IDF Paratroopers Banned from Yad Vashem Ceremony

Friday, April 15th, 2016

Paratroopers’ battalion 890 in 1955 with Chief of Staff Moshe Dayan, and (l-r standing) Lieutnant Meir Har-Zion, Major Arik Sharon, Captain Dani Matt (bearded), Lieutnant Moshe Efron, Major General Asaf Simchoni. Sitting: Captain Aharon Davidi (bearded), Lieutnant Ya’akov Ya’akov, Captain Raful Eitan. It turns out that IDF soldiers, religious and secular alike, are banned from representing the Jewish army in official ceremonies, News 0404 discovered this week, and the IDF Spokesperson’s office confirmed. The event was a Yad Vashem commemoration ceremony, and the soldiers were warriors from Battalion 202 of the storied Paratroopers Brigade.

It should be noted that General Danny Matt, the legendary commander whose name is synonymous with the IDF paratroopers’ brigade was endowed with a thick and bushy beard that any Hasidic rebbe would have been proud to wear (even though he was not a particularly religious person). Likewise Brigadier Aharon Davidi, another legendary paratrooper.

In fact, some inside the brigade were astonished to find out that bearded Jewish soldiers would not be let into an institution dedicated to documenting the tragic fate of millions of bearded Jews.

MK Bezalel Smotrich (Habayit Hayehudi) called on Chief of Staff Maj. Gen. Gadi Eizenkot to change the humiliating rule. “The directive shows a disconnect, even a cultural distance from the world of Jewish values,” Smotrich told News 0404, “and I call on the Chief of Staff to change it. It is inconceivable that we’ll be at the same time encouraging the service of religious and Haredi soldiers in the IDF and then barring them from state ceremonies because their appearance is a disgrace to the army.”

JNi.Media

Double Standards on Facebook

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013

Some things, you have to see to believe.  I was alerted by a friend, a couple of days ago, to the existence of a truly revolting, anti-Semitic Facebook page called “The Untold History,” which, according to Facebook, does not violate Facebook’s standards.

We practice link hygiene here at TOC, so I offer this write-up from the Online Hate Prevention Project (OHPP) website, which contains a link to the offensive Facebook page.  If you can stomach another round of anti-Semitic imagery, cast a glance at the image copied in this post from the Facebook page – one of quite a few.  The page has 833 “Likes” as of this writing.

We don’t know how many users have reported this page for “hate speech,” against which Facebook has a policy.  But several of those who have reported the page have posted in the comments at OHPP’s Facebook page that the response they received was like this one (posted by OHPP):

fb-response

The text reads:

Thank you for taking the time to report something that you feel may violate our Community Standards.  Reports like yours are an important part of making Facebook a safe and welcoming environment.  We reviewed the page you reported for containing hate speech or symbols and found it doesn’t violate our community standard on hate speech.

(This is the response I received as well.)

I tend toward the libertarian when it comes to freedom of expression; as long as Facebook is a private company, I believe it has the right to host or not host what seems proper to its leadership and shareholders.  Facebook can afford its users the latitude of expression it prefers, even when the expression in question is really offensive; the customer base can then decide to participate or not accordingly.

But since Facebook has a policy on hate speech, what is the company’s standard for latitude in freedom of expression?  What doesn’t get to remain on Facebook?  Where does the arbiter make the cut-off, and can users trust that it’s being done fairly?  This week, we have been given a unique opportunity to do a comparison with what did get banned at Facebook – if only for a few days.

On 9 August, author and columnist Ruthie Blum posted a column in which she recounted her recent adventures in being banned by Facebook:

For the past two months, I have intermittently been barred from Facebook.

The first time it happened was in June, when I tried to post my Israel Hayom column. Suddenly, a window popped up, telling me that inappropriate material had been found on, and removed from, my page. I was warned that if I continued violating Facebook’s “community standards,” I would be banned from the social network for good.

The notice included a link specifying these standards, and a demand that I click to acknowledge I had read and understood them. Failure to do so, it said, would result in my inability even to open Facebook to read my newsfeed. I complied.

Ms. Blum worked through the wickets Facebook set up for restoring her account to its good graces, but was unable to determine what, exactly, had violated its standards.  She was barred from Facebook for 24 hours at one point, and then for three days.

Her columns, she observes, are political in nature.  (Ms. Blum was formerly an editor at The Jerusalem Post.)  I append links to samples of them from the relevant timeframe here, here, here, here, and here.  She writes responsibly, in measured tones, and with reason and documentation; there is nothing intemperate or inflammatory about her content.  You might disagree with its political perspective, but you could not reasonably consider it “hate speech,” violence, threats, or bullying.  One thing it is completely free of:  graphics depicting anyone, or depicting anyone’s ethnic or religious symbols, surrounded by dead bodies and blood.

Here’s a screen cap from one of her recent columns at Israel Hayom:

blum-1

Contrast the tone and presentation of the type of content she was trying to link to with a random sampling of the content at The Untold History’s Facebook page:

J. E. Dyer

Israeli GetTaxi Launches New York Limo Service

Friday, August 9th, 2013

Israelis and taxis in New York — not exactly news, except that this story is not about Israelis driving taxis, but offering a hi-tech solution to taxi-starved New Yorkers.

On Thursday, GetTaxi Ltd. announced the launching of its new taxi hailing app in New York City, after many delays, partly due to resistance from the taxi union and the Taxi and Limousine Commission. The company now serves busy urbanites in London, Moscow, Tel Aviv and New York, Globes reports.

“We realized that we might not be necessary,” says GetTaxi VP marketing Nimrod May. “It’s easy to hail a cab in Manhattan. You stand at the curb and hundreds of cabs are driving around to pick you up. In contrast, at rush hour, when you need a cab, it’s hard to find one. This is where we enter the picture.”

Smart man. Anyone who spent quality time fighting over a cab at a Manhattan street corner should grab the new app.

GetTaxi, which was banned from using the noun Taxi in NYC, will operate under a special label, “G-Car,” offering a reservation service for limousines in collaboration with the city’s current fleet operators.

“When we founded the company, we dreamed of offering our users an app that would work in every territory and in every language in the world, and we’re pleased to see our vision materializing. We’re pleased to bring GetTaxi’s innovative technology and good, convenient, and state-of-the-art user experience to the residents of and many visitors to New York,” GetTaxi cofounder and CEO Shahar Waiser told Globes.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/israeli-gettaxi-launches-new-york-limo-service/2013/08/09/

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