web analytics
October 26, 2016 / 24 Tishri, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Bar Ilan University’

Massive Traffic Jams Collateral Damage of Internal War in Likud

Sunday, September 4th, 2016

The normal start-of-the-week traffic jams have been more severe than usual Sunday morning, as a result of the limits on train service across the country. Police report severe traffic delays on route 1, connecting Tel Aviv and Jerusalem and both cities to Ben Gurion International Airport. Traffic on the coastal highway, Route 2, is unusually heavy from Caesarea to Tel Aviv. The inner highway, Route 4, is likewise jammed all the way from Holon to Bar Ilan University in Ramat Gan, to Ra’ana in both directions. Route 5 connecting the coastal highway with Ariel in Samaria is also jammed. Route 20, which cuts through downtown Tel Aviv is jammed, too. Route 65, connecting Hadera with Afula through Umm al-Fahm in the Arab Triangle is also at a standstill.

On Saturday, the Israel Railways Corporation announced that essential infrastructure works that were not carried out on Shabbat by decree of Prime Minister Netanyahu would be done Sunday, thus paralyzing most of the train service until 7 PM. The stoppage came against the background of Haredi party resistance to carrying out work on Shabbat, and the apparent capitulation of the prime minister, but judging by what the Haredi press had to say Sunday morning, this was more a provocation by Transport Minister Yisrael Katz (Likud) than an actual crisis.

The daily Yated Ne’eman cited MK Moshe Gafni (UTJ) who accused Katz of acting out of revenge rather than caring for the services of his ministry. “The abominable conduct of Yisrael Katz proves that he does not care about danger to life, and not about the train, only about politics and his need to take revenge against the prime minister,” Gafni said.

Train service has been greatly curtailed Sunday morning. The IDF has added buses to transport soldiers returning to base from their Shabbat break. IDF representatives will guide confused soldier to the right buses. Israel’s inter-city bus companies have increased their active fleets Sunday to help passengers, which, of course, contributes to the traffic jams on the highways.

Leftwing parties Meretz and Labor called for protest rallies at the dark train stations Saturday night, but only a few hundred protesters showed up at the Tel Aviv rally, and only a few dozens at the Haifa event. The real fight over the train works and train service is being waged inside the Likud Party, between Prime Minister Netanyahu and his rebellious Transport Minister and Likud Secretariat Chairman Yisral Katz. (See: Coalition Chair: No Coming back from Netanyahu Vs. Transport Minister Crisis)


NASA, Israel Space Agency Working Together on Reaching Mars

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

NASA administrator Charles Bolden says the space agency is going to be working together with Israel on reaching the planet Mars in the next 20 years.

Bolden spoke at Bar Ilan University earlier this week about NASA’s journey to Mars, and tonight (Tuesday, June 7) he’s slated to receive an honorary doctorate from the university.

Approximately 250 experiments take place in each 6-month expedition on the International Space Station, Bolden said.

Now the NASA administrator has told Bar Ilan University that he is talking with the Israel Space Agency about participating in those experiments.

Bolden says the leadership at the U.S. space agency believes life existed on Mars at one time, and that it was very similar to that of Earth. Today that is not the case, ho wever, and NASA is trying to figure out why.

Hana Levi Julian

800 Jewish Mothers from 10 Countries Renaissance in Israel

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

More than 800 Jewish mothers from 10 countries on Monday celebrated their Jewish Women’s Renaissance Project (JWRP) life-changing journey to Israel at a mega event at the Wohl Center, Bar Ilan University, organized in partnership with the Ministry of Diaspora Affairs.

Headlining the event was Minister of Diaspora Affairs Naftali Bennett (Habayit Hayehudi), who discussed the future of the Diaspora-Israel relationship, the role of women in strengthening ties between the Jewish state and the Jewish people, and current issues facing Israel. “Being a Jew has a meaning – we have a mission – to fix the world,” Bennett told the gathering, adding that “Israel is an exemplar to the world.”

Also speaking at the mega event was Sivan Yaari, the founder and CEO of Innovation Africa, and Zohar Raviv, the international vice president of education for Taglit Birthright Israel.

The Jewish mothers journeyed to Israel from Australia, Argentina, Canada, Chile, Cuba, Germany, Mexico, Panama, South Africa and the US. A few Israeli mothers participated as well.

Featuring the theme “Beginnings,” the JWRP’s “Momentum” trips empower women, inspiring them to engage with Israel and Israelis, connect to their Jewish identities, develop new leadership skills and – ultimately – build their own communities back home. The Momentum trips stretch from the mystical Galilee city of Tsfat to the ancient desert mountaintop fortress Masada, and feature extensive itineraries and curricula from Jewish values to contemporary Israeli society.

JWRP Founding Director Lori Palatnik, referring to the Momentum participants, said: “We always say the last day of the trip is the first day of their journey. For the very first time, we will be saying ‘l’hitraot’ (see you later) to 400 Jewish mothers finishing their trip, while welcoming hundreds more who literally just landed. There are no words to describe the power of 800 Jewish mothers under the same roof, with all of the energy, emotions and inspiration. They return to their families ready to lift them into a new commitment to Israel, their Jewish values and their home communities.”

The JWRP and Ministry of Diaspora Affairs recently announced an historic partnership to dramatically expand the JWRP’s life-changing trips for more than 5,600 Jewish mothers from 26 countries. The landmark partnership for 2016 and 2017 will also allow JWRP and the Ministry to involve women from Jewish communities facing increased threats of anti-Semitism and economic hardship, especially in Argentina, Cuba, the former Soviet Union, France, the US, and Canada.

Since 2009, more than 7,300 Jewish mothers from 150 partner organizations in 26 countries spanning several continents including Australia, Africa, Europe, North America, and South America have experienced the Momentum trips. Participants commit to getting involved in activities when they return home, including community events, Israel engagement programs, Jewish education, global learning, leadership development and Momentum Israel missions for husbands.

David Israel

Egyptian Amulet Bearing Name of Pharaoh Found in Soil from Temple Mount

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

A rare amulet, more than 3,200 years old, bearing the name of the Egyptian ruler Thutmose III, Pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty who reigned from 1479 – 1425 BCE, was discovered at the Temple Mount Sifting Project located in Jerusalem’s Tzurim Valley National Park in soil discarded from the Temple Mount, and was only recently deciphered by archeologists. The project is conducted under the auspices of Bar-Ilan University, with the support of the City of David Foundation and the Israel Nature and Parks Authority.

Thutmose III was one of the most important pharaohs in Egypt’s New Kingdom and is credited with establishing the Egyptian imperial province in Canaan, conducting 17 military campaigns to Canaan and Syria and defeating a coalition of Canaanite kings at the city of Megiddo in 1457 BCE,” stated Dr. Gabriel Barkay, the co-founder and director of the Temple Mount Sifting Project. “Thutmose III referred to himself as ‘the one who has subdued a thousand cities,’ and it is known that for more than 300 years, during the Late Bronze Age, Canaan and the city-state of Jerusalem were under Egyptian dominion, likely explaining the presence of this amulet in Jerusalem.”

The amulet was discovered by Neshama Spielman, a twelve year-old girl from Jerusalem who came with her family to participate in the Temple Mount Sifting Project. “While I was sifting, I came across a piece of pottery that was different from others I had seen, and I immediately thought that maybe I had found something special,” said Spielman. “It’s amazing to find something thousands of years old from ancient Egypt all the way here in Jerusalem! Celebrating Passover this year is going to be extra meaningful to me.”

The Passover festival, commemorating the Biblical account of the ancient Israelites Exodus from Egypt, will be celebrated later this week.

Egyptian amulet bearing the name of the Egyptian ruler, Thutmose III. – Credit: Zachi Dvira

Egyptian amulet bearing the name of the Egyptian ruler, Thutmose III. – Credit: Zachi Dvira

Since the project’s inception in 2004, more than 170,000 volunteers from Israel and around the world have taken part in the sifting, representing an unprecedented phenomenon in the realm of archaeological research.

The small amulet is in the shape of a pendant, missing its bottom part, measures 21 mm wide, 4 mm thick and its preserved length is 16 mm. A loop on top allowed it to be strung and hung on the neck. The raised decoration displays a cartouche — an oval frame surrounding Egyptian hieroglyphics bearing the name of the Egyptian ruler. Above the oval framing is the symbol of an eye, and to its right are remnants of yet another hieroglyphic symbol depicting a cobra of which parts of the head and tail are preserved.

While Egyptian scarabs bearing the name of Thutmose III have previously been discovered in Jerusalem, this represents the first time his name has been found in Jerusalem adorning an amulet. “Objects bearing the name of Thutmose III continued to be produced in Egypt long after the time of his reign, reflecting the significance and lasting impression of this king,” said Barkay.

The amulet can be reconstructed based upon the discovery of an identical pendant found in Nahal Iron in northern Israel, announced in 1978,” said Zachi Dvira, co-founder and director of the Temple Mount Sifting Project. “Along with that pendant, which also bore the name of Thutmose III, was another amulet bearing the name of King Seti I, an Egyptian pharaoh who ruled Egypt during the late 14th – early 13th centuries BCE. This seems to indicate that both pendants date to the same time period, namely the late 14th – early 13th century BCE.”

The research of the amulet was conducted by Israel Antiquities Authority Egyptologist Baruch Brandl.

“A discovery such as this is particularly symbolic at this time of year, with the Passover festival just a few days away, and represents greetings from the ancient past,” said Assaf Avraham, archeologist and director of the Jerusalem Walls National Park from the Israel Nature and Parks Authority.

Neshama Spielman, 12 years-old from Jerusalem, holding the amulet bearing the name of the Egyptian ruler, Thutmose III. – Credit: Adina Graham

Neshama Spielman, 12 years-old from Jerusalem, holding the amulet bearing the name of the Egyptian ruler, Thutmose III. – Credit: Adina Graham

The Temple Mount Sifting Project, under the auspices of Bar-Ilan University and with the support of the City of David Foundation and the Israel Nature and Parks Authority, was initiated in response to the illegal removal of tons of earth from the Temple Mount by the Islamic Waqf in 1999 without any archaeological supervision.

“Since the Temple Mount has never been excavated, the ancient artifacts retrieved in the Sifting Project provide valuable and previously inaccessible information. The many categories of finds are among the largest and most varied ever found in Jerusalem. Even though they have been extracted from their archaeological context, most of these artifacts can be identified and dated by comparing them with those found at other sites,” said Dvira.

In addition to the ongoing sifting of the earth illegally removed from the Temple Mount by the Muslim Waqf, The Temple Mount Sifting Project has focused its efforts on the enormous tasks of processing and studying the finds and preparing them for scientific publication. Presently, more than half a million finds are still waiting to be processed and analyzed in their laboratory.


CoP Leaders Hear About Media Coverage of Israel, Strategic Challenges, and from Rivlin

Friday, February 19th, 2016

President Reuven Rivlin welcomed the more than 100 American Jewish leader delegates of the 42nd annual Conference of Presidents’ Leadership Mission to Israel at his official residence, Beit HaNasi, on Thursday, Feb. 18.

Rivlin told them that he hoped that Israel would not become a divisive topic in this election season. “Support for Israel has never been and must not become a partisan issue,” he said.

Referring to the recent outbreak of violence in Israel, Rivlin said, “The wave of terror does not discriminate against right and left, or between Jews and Arabs. We continue to pay a heavy price for our independence. We appreciate your support very much during these difficult times, and we know that we have you as partners because we are the same people.”

The President said that the real problem is with extremists who believe that incitement brings them power.

The delegation had an off-the-record discussion with U.S. Ambassador to Israel Daniel Shapiro and then observed experts engage in two panel discussions.

The first panel focused on media coverage of Israel in the foreign press.

David Horovitz, Founding Editor, Times of Israel, moderated the media panel with the participation of Barbara Opall-Rome, Israel Bureau Chief, Defense News; Lt. Col. Peter Lerner, IDF Spokesperson, Head of Foreign Press Branch; Udi Segal, Diplomatic correspondent for Israeli television’s Channel 2; and Josef Federman, Israel Bureau Chief, Associated Press.

Panel on Media Coverage of Israel in the Foreign Press during COP's 2016 Leadership Mission to Israel. l to r : David Horovitz, Founding Editor, Times of Israel, Josef Federman, Israel Bureau Chief, Associated Press. Barbara Opall-Rome, Israel Bureau Chief, Defense News; Lt. Col. Peter Lerner, IDF Spokesperson, Head of Foreign Press Branch; Udi Segal, Diplomatic correspondent, Israeli television’s Channel 2.

Panel on Media Coverage of Israel in the Foreign Press during COP’s 2016 Leadership Mission to Israel. l to r : David Horovitz, Josef Federman, Barbara Opall-Rome, Lt. Col. Peter Lerner, Udi Segal.

Horovitz framed the discussion by saying that the root of the legitimate grievance directed at the foreign media’s Israel coverage is lack of context and perspective, and that the wider challenges facing Israel are underestimated.

Udi Segal said, “Israel should not be complaining about unfairness in the media,” arguing that foreign journalists should be given more access to the information they need.

Lerner said the media is essentially professional, “but sometimes lack time, accuracy, context, and professional ethics. Professional journalists should investigate what incitement really means; there needs to be a fuller story, it’s not a simple story.”

Opall-Rome argued that the word “terrorism” is loaded and often misused; she defined it as “an act of violence against unarmed civilians.”

Consistent with her definition, Opall-Rome said, the attack on Gilad Shalit’s tank and his subsequent kidnapping could not be considered terrorism, but the recent murder of the mother of six, Dafna Meir, could, albeit with the proviso that she be identified in the press as a settler. Why that identification would be necessary for reasons other than to delegitimize the victim is hard to understand.

Federman said “it has become very unpleasant to be a journalist in this country.” He also said that the more than 400 journalists in the Foreign Press Association were not monolithic, adding: “There is very little intentional distortion, errors are usually due to haste or carelessness, and are generally corrected quickly.” In response, Ms. Opall-Rome cited a Dubai-based journalist for Defense News who repeatedly referred to the IDF as the IOF – the Israeli Occupation Forces in his reporting, but her outlet would not permit the use of that term.

Lori Lowenthal Marcus

When the Middle East Creates Strange Bedfellows

Wednesday, August 12th, 2015


Mideast expert Mordechai Kedar joins Yishai to talk about some odd political developments and alliances in the region.

Dr. Kedar, research associate at the Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies and lecturer in the department of Arabic at Bar-Ilan University, offers his insights about Russia’s talks with Syria, Israel’s and Hezbollah’s shared interest in stopping ISIS and the nuclear deal’s unexpectedly negative ramifications for Iran.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Moshe Herman

Germany To Fund Joint Bar-Ilan, Leipzig Universities Research Center

Sunday, March 15th, 2015

Published in Jewish Business News

The German government will contribute $472,000 towards a new biblical era research center at Bar-Ilan University, which is being established to mark 50 years of diplomatic relations between Israel and Germany.

Bar-Ilan University will be the location of one of two new Minerva Centers to be established in Israel, the German Minister of Education and Research, Prof. Johanna Wanka, has announced.

Entitled “The Minerva Center for the Relations between Israel and Aram in Biblical Times: The Construct of Autonomous Decision Making and Interdependencies” the Minerva Center is being awarded by the Minerva Foundation, of the German Max Planck Society, to Prof. Aren M. Maeir, of Bar-Ilan University’s Martin (Szusz) Department of Land of Israel Studies and Archaeology, and Prof. Angelika Berlejung, of the University of Leipzig.

The two will serve as co-directors of the center, which will include scholars from Bar-Ilan University and the University of Leipzig. The center’s primary objective will be to conduct joint research on the character of Aramean-Israelite relations during the biblical period (Iron Age and Persian Period).

“The cultures of Israel and of Aram are two of the most important cultures of the ancient eastern Mediterranean (and the ancient world in general), not only due to the fact that they played a crucial role during early periods (and are extensively portrayed in the biblical text), but also because they are among the few cultures of antiquity (not only in the Levant but in the entire world) whose cultural patrimony exists until today,” says Prof. Maeir, who also directs the Ackerman Family Bar-Ilan University Expedition to Gath.

The Minerva Center is currently funded for six years, during which a series of conferences, meetings, workshops, student mentorships, and various joint Israeli-German meetings and activities will be carried out, both on the senior/researcher level, as well as between students from both countries.

JBN / Jewish Business News

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/germany-to-fund-joint-bar-ilan-leipzig-universities-research-center/2015/03/15/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: