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December 11, 2016 / 11 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Beit Hamikdash’

Ancient Muslim Inscription Confirms Dome of the Rock’s Jewish Temple Origin

Friday, October 28th, 2016

The ninth annual conference on archaeological discoveries in Jerusalem and its environs that was held at the Hebrew University this week revealed the existence of an ancient Muslim inscription testifying to the fact that the original name of the Dome of the Rock, Qubbat al-Sakhrah, was “Beit al Maqdis” بيت المقدس — “Beit Hamikdash” in Hebrew, aka the Jewish Temple — during the early Muslim era, Makor Rishon reported Friday.

According to archaeologists Assaf Avraham and Peretz Reuven, the inscription is dated to the 10th century CE, about a thousand years ago. It is located above a mihrab-prayer niche inside an active mosque in the village of Nuba, located seven miles north-west of Hebron. It is unknown when it was placed there, but it certainly throws a fresh light on the process by which Jerusalem became holy to the Muslims and the inspiration that Islam drew from Jewish sources regarding the holiness of the Temple Mount compound and the Jewish temple that once stood at the spot where today stands the Dome of the Rock shrine.

"In the name of Allah, the merciful God This territory, Nuba, and all its boundaries and its entire area, is an endowment to the Rock of Bayt al-Maqdis and the al-Aqsa Mosque, as it was dedicated by the Commander of the Faithful, ̒Umar iben al-Khattab for the sake of Allah the Almighty"

“In the name of Allah, the merciful God
This territory, Nuba, and all its boundaries
and its entire area, is an endowment to the Rock
of Bayt al-Maqdis and the al-Aqsa Mosque,
as it was dedicated by the Commander of the Faithful, ̒Umar iben al-Khattab for the sake of Allah the Almighty”
Photo by: Assaf Avraham

Participants in the Jerusalem conference were particularly excited by this revelation in light of two recent UNESCO resolutions which disavowed any connection between Jewish history and the Temple Mount. One participant reminded the forum that the Mufti of Jerusalem already admitted that the Dome of the Rock stands on the same spot as Solomon’s Temple, “but here we have an archaeological find that proves it,” he said.

According to both researchers, in the early Muslim era the Dome of the Rock was the site of worship services that were influenced by the ceremonies of the Jerusalem Temple: cleansing, incense, anointing the Foundation Stone with oil and surrounding it with curtains inspired by the divine parochet. The shrine, built around the Foundation Stone, just like the two Jewish Temples, was completed in 691 CE, by an architect named Yazid Ibn Salam, who was either Jewish himself or had Jewish aides.

There is a theory that Umayyad Caliph Abd al-Malik originally had the Dome of the Rock built as a shrine for the Jews, while Al Aqsa, the mosque on the southern end of the Temple Mount, was built for Muslims.

There is a trend where Muslims have recently begun referring to the entire Temple Mount compound, which they also call al-Haram ash-Sharif (“The Noble Compound”), as Al Aqsa.

David Israel

Israeli Jewish Leaders Furious at UNESCO Rejection of Jewish Ties to Jerusalem

Thursday, October 13th, 2016

Jewish Israeli leaders and lawmakers from both sides of the political spectrum, and from the top on down, were furious Thursday at the passage of the resolution by UNESCO — the cultural arm of the United Nations — rejecting any Jewish ties to the Temple Mount.

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) passed the resolution 24-6, with 26 abstentions, (2 were absent) naming the Temple Mount only by its Arabic name, and makes reference solely to Al Aqsa Mosque and Haram Al-Sharif, and calling the Western Wall Plaza the Al Buraq Plaza. Its Hebrew name, the Kotel, is mentioned in quotation marks.

The move completely negates the hundreds of archaeological artifacts found in the Old City of Jerusalem in the area of the Western Wall, and among the rubble that was discarded by the Islamic Waqf during its unauthorized construction on the Temple Mount. Many are discoveries that have unequivocally substantiated the Biblical accounts written in the Books of the Old Testament.

No Disagreement Among People of Israel Opposition leader and Labor Party chairman Isaac Herzog accused the UN agency in a Facebook post of rewriting history, distorting the facts and “completely inventing a fantasy” in claiming the Western Wall and the Temple Mount have no connection to the Jewish People.

He called the resolution a “terrible lie” that only “serves to increase hatred.” And to those who might be tempted to divide and conquer, he warned, on this matter, “there is no disagreement among the people of Israel.”

‘Shameful, Embarrassing’ Fellow Laborite Eitan Cabel labeled the resolution “anti-Zionist, shameful and embarrassing,” in a blast similar to that of President Reuven Rivlin, who also called it an “embarrassment.”

Speaking from his Jerusalem residence, Rivlin told media, “No forum or body in the world can come and deny the connection between the Jewish people, the Land of Israel and Jerusalem, and any such body that does so is simply embarrassing itself.

“We can understand criticism, but you cannot change history.”

Jewish Home Agriculture Minister Uri Ariel urged the government to seize the moment to increase Jewish activity on the Temple Mount.

“Especially now, it’s on us as a government to act in defiance of these decisions and to strengthen the Temple Mount and the Jewish presence on the site holiest to the Jewish people,” he said.

Hana Levi Julian

PA Charges Jews with Wearing ‘Priestly Garments’ on Temple Mount [video]

Friday, September 25th, 2015

The official Palestinian Authority website WAFA has accused “extremist Jewish settlers” with “wearing priestly garments” on the Temple Mount on Yom Kippur.

WAFA as well as all Arab media inside and outside Israel routinely incite Muslims into a frenzy over Jews “storming” the Temple Mount.

WAFA added that the “settlers,” a term referring to any Jew who ascends the Temple Mount, “attempted to perform Talmudic (Jewish) prayers, however their attempts were foiled by the Mosque guards.”

That statement is probably not true because Jerusalem police stay within inches of all Jews on the Temple Mount and haul them away if they even dare to whisper a prayer.

WAFA also told its faithful that Israeli police were deployed in such large numbers that it made Jerusalem a “military barrack.”

The Palestinian Authority’s official website’s reference to the “priestly garments” could have been part of its strategy of incitement against Jews or could have been plain ignorance and paranoia.

The spokesman for the Jerusalem police did not respond to The JewishPress.com’s request for a response to the accusations by WAFA, but Temple Mount activist Rabbi Yehuda Glick explained that the “priestly garments” were nothing more than the white “kittel.”

The “Kittel” is not a priestly garment. The High Priest indeed were a white robe and trousers during part of the Yom Kippur rituals on the Temple Mount.

However, the “kittel,” which symbolizes purity and is used as a burial shroud for men, is commonly worn in synagogues on Yom Kippur, the Day of Judgment, to symbolize the penalty of death by God for committing sins.

The Orthodox Union explains the ritual on Yom Kippur:

Twice during this exalted day, the Kohen Gadol [High Priest] would remove the eight priestly garments he wore during his service in the Beit HaMikdash [Holy Temple] all year long, immerse in a mikvah and don the four special white linen garments that were used only on Yom Kippur to enter the Kodesh Hakodashim [Holy of Holies].

The only connection between the Kittel and the High Priest’s white robes is that both are white.

The second verse in Chapter of Isaiah states:

Our sins shall be made as white as snow.

Below is video posted on Arab media of Jews, one of them with a ‘Kittel,” on the Temple Mount on Yom Kippur.

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

Build the Beit HaMikdash!

Sunday, August 3rd, 2014

B”H

FREE BEIS HAMIKDASH MODEL FOR KIDS

In preparation for the nine days leading up to Tisha BeAv, a free printable paper model of the Beis HaMikdosh, that kids can assemble, is being made available by Tzivos Hashem Traditional Crafts Workshops.  (To access links, Please Press CTRL  + CLICK}

 

 

While children camps are learning about the Beis Hamikdosh at summer camp during the three weeks, Tzivos Hashem Crafts Workshops is offering a paper model of the Beis HaMikdosh for the kids to assemble, free of charge.

 

The full color model is being developed in collaboration with Rabbi Yehuda Benchemhoun, author of the illustrated book, Messechet Midot, graphic designer Rabbi Mendy Browd and Rabbi Michoel Albukerk. A preview of this model is being offered online to the public so that both the young and young at heart can learn and build the Beis HaMikdosh.

 

There are many different Beis Hamikdosh models, all based on a variety of artistic, and sometimes halachic opinions. This detailed model however, is based only on halachic guidelines. According to Rabbi Benchemhoun the design of this model faithfully follows the Rambam’s description in Hilchos Beis HaBechirah and set to a scale of one millimeter to one cubit.

 

This project is part of the Tzivos Hashem Beis Hamikdosh Craft Workshop, which teaches children about Eretz Yisroel, the history of Har HaBayis and Yerushalayim, the special vessels of the Beis HaMikdosh, and the Temple incense.
The Rebbe urged Torah study in a way that leads to action, and in this way making every Jewish home into a mini-Beis Hamikdash where Hashem dwells. Since children learn best hands-on when they can see and feel what they are studying, using a model to learn about the Holy Temple leads to developing a personal connection to the actual Beis Hamikdosh.
Educators and parents everywhere are excited by this activity. “We are so thrilled by the beautiful pictures coming in from all over the world of children building their own models,” says Rabbi Michoel Albukerk of Tzivos Hashem Crafts Workshops. “The reason I think people are excited, is that here is something visual that kids can really grab a hold of and use to learn from even while it just sits in their living room or on their bookshelf. Educators tell us that they love the Crafts Workshops because there is always a dynamic hands-on component.”

 

For many junior Beis Hamikdosh builders, the model is a tool to spark interest in learning Hilchos Beis Habechira in greater depth. Some amateur architects have even come up with original innovations like cutting open the tiny gates of the model, using foam core to raise the temple courtyard and enlarging the model 150% to make a table top display model for learning classes at camp.

 

If you want to build your own miniature Beis Hamikdosh, get ready. The model takes a bit of time to assemble with lots of cutting and folding. Bring scissors, quick-drying glue, patience and a passion for Arts n’ Crafts. Ideally, the entire model can be completed in a few half hour sessions. Young children might need adult assistance. To get started, follow the instructions below.

 

In the zechus of learning about the Holy Temple, may we merit to see the third Beis HaMikdash descend from heaven in actuality with Moshiach, with the Rebbe, leading us to Yerushalayim.

 

For information about other projects of Tzivos Hashem Crafts Workshops and the Traveling Crafts of the Jewish People, visit Jewish Children.com.

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Print Assembly Instructions
    Download Instruction Guide for Model Beis HaMikdosh.
  2. Download the Model: Click here to download zip file containing the file.
    Email your name (and the name of your school) to JewishChildren18@aol.com and request a password to open the file.
    (In order to maintain the exclusivity of this project, the file is password protected.)
  3. Print the model:
    Print in COLOR on 11×17 (ledger size) CARDSTOCK, (60-85 pound paper). (Y&B, Kinko’s, Staples or any print shop).
  4. Tools:
    CUT then FOLD each piece BEFORE gluing. You will need:
    – Pairs of sharp scissors for detailing
    – Tacky Glue or the like
    – Counselors to help
  5. Study the Beis HaMikdosh:
    – Download the floor plan of the second Beis HaMikdosh to explain the model.
  6. Win:
    Children are eligible to win a free Tzivos Hashem Handbook by sending a photo (jpg) of their finished model to JewishChildren18@aol.com for future publication.
  7. OPTIONAL: Download an illustrated Study Booklet to learn the Mishnayos about the Beis Hamikdash.

For Private Use Only – Not for Resale
Copyright © www.Jewishchildren.com – Tzivos Hashem Crafts Workshops

Any sale of this model in any format is unauthorized. Plagiarizing this model is against Halacho and constitutes a violation of copyright. The purpose of this free offer is to benefit the public, gather feedback and field test our product before publication. If you know of anyone offering this model for sale, whether printed, die cut, pre-cut or in electronic media, please contact JewishChildren18@aol.com.

 

Send questions, feedback and photos of your finished models to JewishChildren18@aol.com).

Michael Albukerk

My Pesach Disappointment

Thursday, March 28th, 2013

There was an article in this weekend’s Makor Rishon. It was about fulfilling the mitzvah of Korban Pesach, the Passover sacrifice, in this day and age. The article went through the Halachot and obligations. It is a unique mitzvah in that it terms of Taharot, you don’t need to do more than dip in the Mikvah.

At the end of the article was a telephone number and the cost to participate (NIS 12) to get your piece of the Korban.

I was so excited.

While I already have plans for this Pesach that put me outside of Jerusalem on the first day, I started making plans with my wife and how we’ll be in Jerusalem next year and fulfill this mitzvah.

(Yes, I’m aware that there is an Issur d’Rabanan to not do it, but if the people don’t start this back up, who will? The Rabbis?)

Anyway… a friend and I called up the number (Israel: 1-800-800-455). He was more subdued about it, because he figured it was a gimmick.

We talked to them. It turns out it was Machon HaMikdash. The article was an “As if” article, describing the process and how it will be fulfilled.

But unfortunately, they were not sacrificing a Korban Pesach this year, and no we couldn’t join a group, and there was no piece of the meat we would get to eat in Jerusalem during the Seder.

I am so disappointed.

Visit The Muqata.

JoeSettler

Visualizing the Beit HaMikdash

Tuesday, December 25th, 2012

Coming soon…

Visit The Muqata.
Jameel@Muqata

Q & A: The Sandak (Part III)

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

Question: I was at a brit where the father and grandfather of the boy argued over who should be sandak. The grandfather had served as sandak once before, but he persisted and, as they say, “might makes right.” I am curious as to your view on this matter.

M. Renkin
(Via E-Mail)

Answer: The Midrash (Tehillim pg. 723) contains the term “sandikus,” a Greek word meaning “companion of child” or “advocate.” Rabbi Tzvi Elimelech Spira of Dinov explains that sandak is an acronym of “sanegor na’aseh din kategor – the defense emerges victorious vis-à-vis the prosecutor,” referring to the brit’s function as a protection from Satan.

The Rema (Yoreh De’ah 265:11) writes that the sandak is given the first honor of being called up to the Torah, even before the mohel. The Rema explains that the sandak is compared to a kohen who offers incense in the Beit Hamikdash. All kohanim wished to benefit from the blessing of the incense, which enriched the one who offered it. Therefore, a lottery was established to assure that all had an equal opportunity to perform it. Similarly, it is customary not to give the role of sandak to one individual more than once.

The Shach (Yoreh Deah ad loc. sk 22) clarifies that Rema does not mean that one may not be a sandak more than once. Rather, if a person has served as sandak for a boy, he should not serve as sandak for any of his brothers in the future.

The Rema also talks about the honorary role of the kvaterin and kvater, the female and male messengers who bring the baby to the synagogue for the brit.

Last week we continued with Rabbi Ari Enkin’s discussion of this matter in his new sefer, Shu’t HaShulchani, which we now conclude.

* * * * *

Rabbi Enkin continues his discussion of whether someone should serve as sandak twice (Shu’t HaShulchani 154-156):

“There is also a variation of this custom, seemingly of Turkish and Greek origin, in which one refrains from honoring the same person to serve as sandak twice in a single year – should another boy be born to the family within that time – but allows him to serve as sandak once again after a year has passed.

“There is also an opinion that the custom does not apply to relatives. According to this approach, one can invite a relative to serve as sandak more than once. This is especially true with regard to the baby’s father. Indeed, a father shouldn’t hesitate to be the sandak for all of his children should he so desire.

“Although the custom of restricting a sandak to once per family is widely observed, there are some exceptions to the rule. In some communities, the local rabbi is designated as the exclusive sandak and this includes serving as sandak for multiple children from the same family. It is explained that such an arrangement is not truly a deviation from the supposed custom, for the community rabbi can be compared to the Kohen Gadol, who was indeed permitted to perform the incense offering over and over. Similarly, very prominent, world-renowned rabbis are often repeatedly invited to serve as sandak for the same family.

“It is also noted that the custom to restrict someone form serving as a sandak twice likely originates from Rabbi Yehuda Hachassid, whose rulings are often understood as being optional in nature. So too, the custom of restricting someone from serving as sandak more than once is not found in the Talmud. As a general rule, though there are many exceptions, a restriction that doesn’t have its origins in the Talmud is not truly binding.

“Indeed, the conclusion of most halachic authorities is that one may indeed serve as a sandak more than once for the same family should one be invited to do so.

“There is also a view that it is the mohel, not the sandak, who is comparable to a kohen offering the incense in the Beit Hamikdash. Even according to this approach, however, there is no restriction on using the same mohel more than once.”

(To be continued)

Rabbi Yaakov Klass

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/ask-the-rabbi/q-a-the-sandak-part-iii/2012/11/14/

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