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July 26, 2016 / 20 Tammuz, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Beitar Illit’

Baby Hurt in Arab Rock Attack Near Beitar Illit

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

An infant was hurt Thursday morning in an Arab terror attack on the highway near the entrance to the Jewish community of Beitar Illit, in Judea.

Stone-throwing Arabs attacked the vehicle in which the six-month-old baby was riding, according to Magen David Adom medics, who said the vehicle was heading towards Jerusalem at the time.

The infant was struck by shards of glass from the window that was smashed by the rocks hurled by the terrorists.

After being treated at the scene, the baby was evacuated to a nearby hospital for continued medical treatment.

IDF soldiers launched a search for the attackers.

Hana Levi Julian

Road Terror Rock Attack Near Beitar Illit in Judea

Wednesday, September 16th, 2015

Palestinian Arab terrorists attacked an Israeli motorist driving near the Jewish community of Beitar Illit in Judea around midday Wednesday (Sept. 16).

The attackers hurled rocks at the vehicle as it passed on the road near the community. One of the rocks succeeded in smashing the windshield of the car; it was hurled with such force that it slammed through the windshield and landed on the floor of the back seat of the vehicle.

No one was physically injured but at least one person in the car was badly traumatized in the attack and required treatment at the scene.

Hana Levi Julian

World’s Youngest Hassidic Rebbe Gets Married

Friday, June 5th, 2015

Judah Zundel Biedermann waited seven years for the moment he would fill his father’s shoes — his father being the late Lelov Rebbe of Beitar Illit. This week, at the tender age of 19 and a half, he celebrated that happiest day of his life.

With family, friends and acquaintances watching, Biedermann married his loved one at an events hall in central Israel. And with his wedding, he also became the world’s youngest Hassidic Rebbe.

Judah Zundel is the eldest son of Rabbi Shimon Natan Neta Biderman — the Lelov Rebbe of Beitar Illit in Gush Etzion, some 6 miles south of Jerusalem. The Rebbe died seven years ago, with his son only 12. Judah was nicknamed the “yanuka,” or youngster, which is the title usually given the heir apparent of a Rebbe who isn’t yet of age to take over.

Three years after his father’s passing, when he was 15, Judah oversaw with authority the memorial get together marking the date, and the chareidi press was delighted in the young man’s ability to fit in his father’s shoes. His hassidim reported that he presided over the “Tish” like a real Rebbe, noting that the only thing preventing him from getting the job officially, was the fact that he was not yet married.

After the wedding this week, and through the first year of his marriage, the new Lelov Rebbe will live in Bnei Brak, with short weekend hops to Betar Illit, his father’s city.

The Beitar Illit Levov court is relatively small, comprising only a few dozen families, but they all share an admiration for their new spiritual leader.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Mother Injured in Attack in Gush Etzion

Wednesday, May 13th, 2015

Terrorist threw an empty glass bottle at a Jewish car being driven near The Amos junction in Gush Etzion on Wednesday morning.

The windshield was damaged. Some glass hit the mother, lightly injuring her. The baby was not injured.

She continued driving to a nearby first-aid station.

Earlier this morning, stone-throwers hit a driver near Beitar Ilit, lightly injuring the driver.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Arab Rock Attacks on Israeli Drivers in Jerusalem, Gush Etzion

Monday, September 1st, 2014

Arab terror gangs have again attacked Israeli vehicles over the past few hours on main arteries around Jerusalem.

In the early afternoon, Egged Bus No. 161, which travels through the Etzion bloc in Gush Etzion, was the target of a massive rock attack as it drove towards the capital.

Arabs hurled rocks at the sides and windshield of the bus, hoping to distract or even injure the driver enough to force an accident and stop the bus. The deadly strategy, which has been used successfully in the past, would enable the terrorists to finish off the passengers as well as the driver.

The ambush occurred near the Beitar Illit junction and the attackers smashed the windshield of the bus, but did not succeed in distracting the driver, who was well-trained. He kept the vehicle moving and drove out of harm’s way.

Miraculously, no one was physically injured although a number of passengers were traumatized by the incident.

Earlier in the day, a private vehicle was also targeted in a separate attack near Hadassah Medical Center at Mount Scopus.

Private car ambushed in Arab rock attack about 200 meters from the entrance to Hadassah Medical Center at Mt. Scopus on Sept. 1, 2014.

Private car ambushed in Arab rock attack about 200 meters from the entrance to Hadassah Medical Center at Mt. Scopus on Sept. 1, 2014.

The driver of the vehicle told the Hebrew-language 0404 website that he and his wife were attacked by Arabs about 200 meters ahead of the entrance to the medical center.

Early this morning, the Jerusalem Light Rail was also attacked by Arab thugs who hurled rocks at the train as it passed through the capital’s northern neighborhood of Shuafat. The attackers did not succeed in damaging the cars — this time — and none of the passengers were physically injured although some were traumatized.

The Light Rail only returned the route to full service through northern Jerusalem this week, after a forced hiatus due to damage caused by four attacks in a 12-hour span on Aug. 25. Rioting Arabs in Shuafat targeted the train and hurled a rain of rocks and firebombs at the rail cars, damaging several at a cost of tens of thousands of shekels and terrifying the passengers. The route was suspended for a week — cutting off service to thousands of Jewish and Arab commuters who use the line in northern Jerusalem neighborhoods.

The move followed a period in which service was suspended in early July due to the destruction of three stops in Shuafat by rioting Arabs who vowed to permanently stop the train from ever passing through the neighborhood again.

Hana Levi Julian

Bennett Urges Annexing Major Jewish Centers in Judea and Samaria

Sunday, December 8th, 2013

Naftali Bennett, chairman of the Jewish Home party and a key government coalition partner, has publicly proposed that Israel annexing Maaleh Adumim, Gush Etzion and other areas in Judea and Samaria where there are large Jewish population centers.

“I favor implementation of Israeli sovereignty over the zone where 400,000 [settlers] live and only 70,000 Arabs,” Bennett, who also is Minister of Economy, said on Israeli radio Sunday. His numbers are way off the mark, unless he was including approximately 250,000 Jews who live in areas of Jerusalem that have been under Israeli sovereignty since 1980. The United States and the United Nations still refer to them as “settlements.”

Bennett did not refer to any specific communities, but Maaleh Adumim, east of Jerusalem, Beitar Illit, Efrat and neighboring communities in Gush Etzion, and the city of Ariel are home to approximately 150,000 Jews, about half of those living in Judea and Samaria.

Even talking about annexing parts of Judea and Samaria could be enough to scuttle U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry’s “Peace Talk Road Show,” which played another round last week.

Kerry left Israel with triumphant statements, such as “I believe we are closer than we have been in years to bringing about the peace and the prosperity and the security that all of the people of this region deserve.”

Bennett could not have been more negative about Kerry’s cheerleading.

“This is all a joke. It’s as if we’re discussing the purchase of a car with only half of its owners,” Bennett said Sunday.

Add to that juicy comments by Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman and Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon and then ask if Kerry knows what is going in the Israeli government, or ask if chief negotiator is preparing to blow up the whole works by destroying the coalition.

Lieberman told the Saban Center for Middle East Policy in Washington Friday, “Today the trust between the two sides is about zero. It’s impossible to create peace if you don’t have any credibility. I don’t believe it is possible in the next year… to achieve a comprehensive solution to achieve some breakthrough but I think it is crucial to keep our dialogue.”

Ya’alon told the annual Globes Business Conference Saturday night, “As someone who supported Oslo [Accords], I’m learning that on the other side we have no partner for two states for two people. There is no one on the other side, and hasn’t been since the dawn of Zionism, a leadership that is prepared to recognize our right to exist as a nation-state for the Jewish nation, and to recognize an agreement as the end of the conflict and the end to demands.”

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

Post-Election Construction: Will It Happen?

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

Now that the elections in Jerusalem are over, and with murderous Palestinian terrorists having been freed from prison, there seems to be an across-the-board desire to resume Jewish construction in the capital. The question is: Will this new enthusiasm last long enough for tractors to actually start work?

Prime Minister Netanyahu, under whose watch Jewish construction in the outlying areas of the Holy City has ground to a resounding halt, let it be known that together with last week’s release of killers from prison, he will initiate construction in eastern Jerusalem and Judea and Samaria (Yesha). And in fact, the Housing Ministry announced this week plans for 1,000 new housing units in large Yesha towns – though not in the smaller ones that need it most – and 700 more in Jerusalem.

Specifically, Gilo, Har Homa and Ramat Shlomo – among the Jerusalem neighborhoods liberated from Jordanian control during the Six-Day War – are scheduled to gain hundreds of apartments. In Yesha, the 1,030 new units will be distributed among Elkanah, Beitar Illit, Karnei Shomron, Maaleh Adumim, Givat Ze’ev, Adam, and Ariel (in descending order).

It is said that Netanyahu’s sudden benevolence is an attempt to offset the popular resentment and anger at his government’s release of terrorist murderers. Fifty-two such killers have already been freed in the framework of the ongoing negotiations with the Palestinian Authority – half the total set to be freed as the talks proceed.

This could be a case of getting hit with the fish, paying for it, and having to eat it in any event. For one thing, the Bayit Yehudi (Jewish Home) party doesn’t accept the gesture. “Don’t do us any favors,” party officials told Netanyahu. “Don’t release terrorists and don’t build.”

The Yesha Council of Jewish Communities responded similarly: “Releasing terrorists is a terrible mistake both morally and politically. We object even if it is bound up with decisions to build.”

In addition, the PA used the occasion to attack Israel for “sabotaging” the talks and violating their pre-conditions, and its top negotiator even announced his resignation. Though their accusations are totally false – Israel agreed beforehand with U.S. Secretary of State Kerry that no restrictions would apply to Israeli construction during the talks – the international damage to Israel’s reputation has been done.

And in the end, who says the construction will actually ever happen? In the face of international condemnation, it could very well be that the building plans – so necessary for the vitality of Israel’s economy, both inside and outside of Yesha – will go the way of last month’s Hebron announcement: Following a murderous terrorist attack, Netanyahu announced that Jews would be allowed to populate the Jewish-owned Beit HaMachpelah building – and the next day the decision was reversed.

On the municipal level, newly reelected mayor Nir Barkat gave a nod towards the nationalist camp when he said, “I believe we must build [in Jerusalem]; we dare not hesitate. If it were up to us [in the municipality], we would run with it.” He specifically mentioned Gilo, Har Homa, Pisgat Ze’ev – all liberated in 1967 – and other neighborhoods.

Barkat’s political opponents don’t take his pledge very seriously, however. Housing Minister Uri Ariel blames him not for not building, but for not protesting: “It’s the fault of my boss,” he told a crowd of supporters, referring to the prime minister’s construction halt, “but why don’t we see Barkat making an outcry?”

Ariel and Barkat actually agree that there must be no linkage between building in the capital and a possible diplomatic agreement with the PA. “The very attempt to [make an agreement dependent on not building] is the true obstacle,” Barkat said. Ariel was even more pointed, saying:

“Can you imagine any other country forbidding Jews to build houses? We would all run out to the streets to cry out and protest – but here it passes quietly… Netanyahu is not even allowing us to make zoning plans. The construction permits of today are from two years ago. The few hundred new units we obtained are far from enough! We need a minimum of 4,000 new units in Jerusalem each year.”

According to the PA-sympathetic Ir Amim organization, last year saw a record number of tenders issued for housing units in post-1967 neighborhoods – a grand total of 2,386. Keep in mind that this brings up the average number for the past 11 years to the grand total of 877 – quite a bit less than the 4,000 Minister Ariel demands.

Hillel Fendel and Chaim Silberstein / KeepJerusalem.org

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/columns/keeping-jerusalem/post-election-construction-will-it-happen/2013/11/07/

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