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Posts Tagged ‘Bernard Lander’

Rabbi Dr. Bernard Lander, Touro College Founder, Dies

Wednesday, February 10th, 2010

He founded a college that spans the world, and served as its president until his death Monday evening at his home in Forest Hills, New York.

Dr. Bernard Lander, 94, was remembered by family members, friends and associates as a hands-on but modest administrator who took the lead in ensuring that observant Jews had the educational tools to earn a living.

“For bnei Torah, he built yeshivas and kollelim,” said his son, Rabbi Daniel Lander. “For the unaffiliated, he built colleges as a means of outreach and building kiruv.”

The younger Lander serves as rosh yeshiva at Yeshiva Ohr HaChaim in Kew Gardens Hills, founded by his father in memory of his wife, Sarah Rivkah Lander. Dr. Lander’s funeral was held there Tuesday morning.

“Thousands attained the dignity of parnassa because of my father,” said Rabbi Lander. “He built different colleges for different populations.”

Dr. Lander founded Touro in 1970 with a class of 35 students in a midtown office building. Since then, its student body has grown to approximately 23,000, on 29 campuses in the U.S., Europe and Israel.

“There was a common misconception that Touro College was a private business, and he was a successful businessman,” said Rabbi Hershel Schachter of Yeshiva University.

“But Touro is not-for-profit. He received a salary far below his counterparts from other institutions.”

Mourners recalled a leader whose energy and passion endured to his last days.

“He started Touro at age 55; that took guts,” said Rabbi Menachem Genack of the Orthodox Union. “He had a prophetic quality, he never aged, and he knew the future.”

Dr. Lander received his semicha from Yeshiva University and went on to earn a Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University, where he wrote a dissertation on juvenile delinquency.

He was an associate director of the Mayor’s Committee on Unity, established in 1944 by then-New York City Mayor Fiorello La Guardia, which became the city’s first Commission on Human Rights.

Prior to founding Touro, Rabbi Lander served as a professor of sociology for more than two decades at City University of New York and Yeshiva University, where he also served as dean of the Bernard Revel Graduate School.

He was a consultant to three U.S. presidents, and served on the commission that established the War on Poverty program.

Dr. Lander was also an honorary vice president of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America (OU).

Dr. Lander’s ambition had no bounds, as recalled by Touro trustee Dr. Mark Hasten.

“On our visit to Israel, he proposed a solution to the Israeli-Arab conflict. We met with then-Agriculture Minister Ariel Sharon.” Dr. Lander told Sharon about his vision of an agriculture school on the Israeli-Jordanian border. “I almost fell out of my chair,” said Hasten.

At the same time, from his Forest Hills home, even as his vision and voice deteriorated, Dr. Lander continued to closely monitor his closest pupils, calling to check that his grandsons David Waxman and Josh Lander kept up on Yoreh Deah, using the same book Lander used as a rabbinical student.

Dr. Alan Kadish, senior provost and chief operating officer at Touro College, described Rabbi Lander’s passing as “a profound loss. His vision and leadership has been phenomenal. His care and concern for the Jewish people and all of humanity knew no bounds.”

Kadish called Dr. Lander, who is survived by his son, three daughters, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, a “great rabbinic figure and illustrious educator who was a caring and devoted father to his family and extended family.”

“He was a patriarch to us all,” said Touro dean Dr. Stanley Boylan. “He was our rebbe.”

Rabbi Dr. Bernard Lander, Touro College Founder, Dies

Wednesday, February 10th, 2010


He founded a college that spans the world, and served as its president until his death Monday evening at his home in Forest Hills, New York.


Dr. Bernard Lander, 94, was remembered by family members, friends and associates as a hands-on but modest administrator who took the lead in ensuring that observant Jews had the educational tools to earn a living.


“For bnei Torah, he built yeshivas and kollelim,” said his son, Rabbi Daniel Lander. “For the unaffiliated, he built colleges as a means of outreach and building kiruv.”


The younger Lander serves as rosh yeshiva at Yeshiva Ohr HaChaim in Kew Gardens Hills, founded by his father in memory of his wife, Sarah Rivkah Lander. Dr. Lander’s funeral was held there Tuesday morning.


“Thousands attained the dignity of parnassa because of my father,” said Rabbi Lander. “He built different colleges for different populations.”


Dr. Lander founded Touro in 1970 with a class of 35 students in a midtown office building. Since then, its student body has grown to approximately 23,000, on 29 campuses in the U.S., Europe and Israel.


“There was a common misconception that Touro College was a private business, and he was a successful businessman,” said Rabbi Hershel Schachter of Yeshiva University.


“But Touro is not-for-profit. He received a salary far below his counterparts from other institutions.”


Mourners recalled a leader whose energy and passion endured to his last days.


“He started Touro at age 55; that took guts,” said Rabbi Menachem Genack of the Orthodox Union. “He had a prophetic quality, he never aged, and he knew the future.”


Dr. Lander received his semicha from Yeshiva University and went on to earn a Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University, where he wrote a dissertation on juvenile delinquency.


He was an associate director of the Mayor’s Committee on Unity, established in 1944 by then-New York City Mayor Fiorello La Guardia, which became the city’s first Commission on Human Rights.


Prior to founding Touro, Rabbi Lander served as a professor of sociology for more than two decades at City University of New York and Yeshiva University, where he also served as dean of the Bernard Revel Graduate School.


He was a consultant to three U.S. presidents, and served on the commission that established the War on Poverty program.


Dr. Lander was also an honorary vice president of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America (OU).


Dr. Lander’s ambition had no bounds, as recalled by Touro trustee Dr. Mark Hasten.


“On our visit to Israel, he proposed a solution to the Israeli-Arab conflict. We met with then-Agriculture Minister Ariel Sharon.” Dr. Lander told Sharon about his vision of an agriculture school on the Israeli-Jordanian border. “I almost fell out of my chair,” said Hasten.


At the same time, from his Forest Hills home, even as his vision and voice deteriorated, Dr. Lander continued to closely monitor his closest pupils, calling to check that his grandsons David Waxman and Josh Lander kept up on Yoreh Deah, using the same book Lander used as a rabbinical student.


Dr. Alan Kadish, senior provost and chief operating officer at Touro College, described Rabbi Lander’s passing as “a profound loss. His vision and leadership has been phenomenal. His care and concern for the Jewish people and all of humanity knew no bounds.”


Kadish called Dr. Lander, who is survived by his son, three daughters, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, a “great rabbinic figure and illustrious educator who was a caring and devoted father to his family and extended family.”


“He was a patriarch to us all,” said Touro dean Dr. Stanley Boylan. “He was our rebbe.”

‘Reputation Always Lags Behind Reality By Several Years’: A Conversation With Touro College’s Future President

Wednesday, October 21st, 2009

At 94, Dr. Bernard Lander, Touro College’s founder and president for 39 years, is finally ready to pass on the leadership mantle.

Last month Touro announced that Dr. Alan Kadish, formerly professor of medicine at Northwestern University, will succeed Dr. Lander as president in the near future with Dr. Lander set to become the university’s chancellor. Meanwhile, Dr. Kadish will serve as the college’s senior provost and chief operating officer.

Dr. Kadish, born in Brooklyn and raised in Queens, received his medical degree from Yeshiva University’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine and postdoctoral medical training at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital (an affiliate of Harvard Medical School) and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He currently lives in Bergenfield, New Jersey with his wife and four children.

The Jewish Press recently spoke with Dr. Kadish.

The Jewish Press: Northwestern University is one of the best universities in the country. What made you leave that institution to come to Touro?

Dr. Kadish: I believe, and I came here with the belief, that Touro is on its way to becoming an outstanding academic institution. It’s a relatively young school but we have over 17,000 students in 29 schools. There are outstanding faculty members. It takes time to develop a reputation, but what I saw when I visited Touro was evidence of academic quality throughout the institution which far exceeded its reputation.

Of New York’s two Jewish colleges – Yeshiva University (YU) and Touro College – Touro has a reputation among some for being the less “serious” of the two. How do you regard this characterization?

I don’t think that calling something serious or not serious is really useful. What I would say is that Touro and YU have different goals. YU has a particular philosophy, [Torah U'mada], that it tries to inculcate in its students and it directs its education accordingly. And that’s great.

But Touro feels there’s a role for another kind of education. In fact, the kind of education that Touro offers is really the kind of education most universities in the world offer. Most universities in the world don’t promulgate a particular political philosophy, at least not on paper. They provide education, and that’s Touro’s philosophy. We provide education.

Perhaps the fact that Touro’s education in some of its schools is more goal- oriented rather than philosophically motivated leads people to perceive it as less serious. But we certainly don’t view it that way.

How about Touro’s reputation, in certain circles, for providing a decent rather than a great education?

I think that reputation always lags behind reality by several years.

If you look, for example, at Touro’s undergraduate colleges right now, these are actually outstanding institutions with tremendous faculty and world-class deans educated at Ivy League schools who have tremendous commitment to education. I think our goal in the short term actually is not so much to change all that much in these institutions, but rather to get the word out.

It’s also true that because Touro is such a complex institution with many components to it, sometimes there can be some spillover effect [reputation-wise] if one component is not working so well. That’s why one of my goals is to increase quality throughout Touro.

What are some of your other goals?

The first goal, like I said, is to continue to strengthen the academic quality throughout the institution. It’s a large institution with 29 different schools, and there’s excellent education throughout. But there are some places where it can be made better.

A second goal is to solidify the health sciences programs. We want to increase integration and coordination among these programs to help cross-fertilize ideas and educational opportunities.

And a third goal that Dr. Lander has, which I fully support, is to try to help grow the international programs at Touro, which he views as outposts of Touro and Yiddishkeit for a variety of different communities throughout the world.

Any other goals?

No, those will take a couple of years!

Touro College Opens School Of Pharmacy

Wednesday, November 5th, 2008

Sixty-Six Students Receive Their ‘White Coats’ At Gala Event 


Families of 66 Touro College Doctor of Pharmacy students recently joined with faculty and guests, as the students were called up individually to receive their “white coat.” This ceremony is the traditional beginning of their entrance into a four-year program, split evenly between classroom and field work. Representatives of the program’s supporters, such as CVS Caremark, Duane Reade, Rite Aid, and Walgreens helped the students don their coats. The ceremony took place at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Manhattan.


In his address Dr. Bernard Lander, Touro’s founder and president, said the School of Pharmacy would reflect the values of Touro College.Dean Dr. Stuart Feldman remarked, “This will be the first school of pharmacy to open in New York City in over 68 years. The neighborhoods are sorely in need of more registered pharmacists. Our innovative program will be housed in modern, state-of-the-art facilities. The curriculum will prepare graduates to practice, and provide patient care in a variety of settings.”


Assistant Dean Dr. Lois A. Garland-Patterson introduced the attending dignitaries, and led the students in reciting the Pledge of Professionalism.


 


 

Students joined Touro College President Dr. Bernard Lander and school officials after the festivities. (L-R) Yaakov Fattakhov; Yehudis Lazarus; Rivka Hecht; Atara Nussbaum; Assistant Dean Dr. Lois A. Garland-Patterson; Dean Dr. Stuart Feldman; Dr. Lander; Abraham Behfar; and Boruch Weingarten. (Photo credit: Shimon Golding)

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/community/touro-college-opens-school-of-pharmacy/2008/11/05/

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