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November 30, 2015 / 18 Kislev, 5776
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Bill de Blasio’

Bill de Blasio Likely Democratic Winner, GOP Picks Lhota

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013

As of 3 AM, NY time, Democratic mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio stood to pick up a little over the 40 percent of the votes in Tuesday’s primary election, and so avoid the runoff. Otherwise, he’ll be facing the next best Democrat, Bill Thompson, who collected 26 percent. Christine Quinn, the obvious heir apparent to Mayor Bloomberg, who led in the polls since last Shavuos came in third with only 15 percent.

Indefatigable texter Anthony Weiner ended up with only 5 percent, after leading the pack in the summer—before he was exposed again, literally. So NYC Democrats, second in overall liberalism and promiscuity only to SF Democrats, still would not pick a perv for high office. There’s still hope for all of us!

No such confusion on the Republican side (with about a sixth of the number of registered voters the Democrats boast). Joseph Lhota has won the GOP mayoral primary, with 52 percent, ahead of John Catsimatidis who received 41 percent.

Meanwhile, in the Democratic city comptroller race, Scott Stringer beat the other perv in Tuesday’s primaries, former governor Eliot Spitzer, by 52 percent to 48 percent. Sigh of relief anyone? On my mark…

There will definitely be a runoff in the Democratic primary for public advocate between my state Senator Daniel Squadron and City Councilwoman Letitia James. NY1 reports that, with more than 96 percent of precincts reporting, James had 36 percent of the vote and Squadron had 33 percent. May I express here my unabashed support for Squadron, a Democrat who combines two rare qualities in politics: he’s both honest and effective.

Brooklyn District Attorney Charles Hynes was defeated by challenger Ken Thompson. Hynes, in his post as Brooklyn DA since 1989, received only 44 percent of the vote, Thompson slid over him with 45 percent. Those meetings with all those rebbes totally paid off.

That’s it for now. We’ll update this item as soon as we know in case the Dems are having a runoff, and where you should show up next to vote.

Election Eve Poll Gives De Blasio Possible First-Round Victory

Monday, September 9th, 2013

Bill de Blasio has turned around the election polls one day before the real vote and has a chance to win Tuesday’s election without a run-off, according to the new and last pre-elections survey conducted by Quinnipiac University.

De Blasio won 39 percent of the respondents’ support, one percent point short of the minimum 40 percent to avoid a second round. In number two place is Bill Thompson, with 25 percent, followed by former front runner Christine Quinn, with only 18 percent.

A Quinnipiac poll last week gave de Blasio 43 percent, and Thompson appeared to have won more backing at de Blasio’s expense in the election eve survey.

Anthony Weiner hardly ranks a mention, and former governor Eliot Spitzer is far behind Scott Stringer in the race for comptroller. Stringer has a seven-point percent lead.

Weiner in Poll is Toast But He’s Still Drinking His Own Kool-Aid

Monday, September 9th, 2013

In a Wall Street Journal-NBC 4 New York-Marist poll taken on Sunday, September 8, of New Yorkers about who they will select as their next mayor, there is a message for Anthony Weiner: You are toast.

In New York speak, it’s “Geddouddaheyah!”

Tuesday’s primary looks to be a cakewalk for Bill De Blasio who has the support of 36 percent of Democrats who are likely to vote.  According to the poll, de Blasio is leading among women, blacks, whites, Latinos, Jews, Catholics and in each of the city’s five boroughs.

In a tie for second and third places are Christine Quinn – the speaker of the New York City Council – who was in the lead for most of the race, and Bill Thompson, a former city comptroller.  Quinn and Thompson each polled at about 20 percent.

In fourth is disgraced former congressman Anthony Weiner, who had been polling at the top until word was released that Weiner continued sending sexually provocative texts to women not his wife even after he was forced to resign from congress for that same misbehavior. Weiner came out in the poll with support from seven percent of likely New York City voters, and former city comptroller John Liu is in last place with 5 percent.

But in the video at the end of this article, you can get a peek at an interview Weiner did for NBC’s Meet the Press which will air on Monday, September 9, in which Weiner said he still believes he will be the next mayor of New York City.

Speaking of former New York state politicians who had to leave their high-powered positions because of sex scandals, former Gov. Eliot Spitzer is actually in a close race with his opponent.

Spitzer held a sizable lead over Manhattan borough president Scott Stringer for most of the race.  But according to Sunday’s poll, the two are virtually neck and neck, with Spitzer at 47 percent and Stringer with 45 percent, which is within the margin of error.

And here’s that clip from NBCNews.com in which Anthony Weiner tells NBC’s Savannah Guthrie that he will be New York City’s next mayor:

Weiner’s Disgrace Boosts De Blasio in Pre-Election Polls

Sunday, August 18th, 2013

Anthony Weiner’s entry in the race for New York City’s next mayor hurt the chances of Bill de Blasio, but the rapid tumble in Weiner’s ratings have turned things around for the liberal de Blasio, the city’s public advocate.

“When Weiner entered the race, de Blasio was the most hurt, since they were both outer borough candidates appealing to the same progressive voters,” Jeanne Zaino, a New York University political science professor, told the Gothamist. “Those people have now turned to him.”

De Blasio’s popularity doubled in the past four weeks, according to last week’s Quinnipiac University poll, and now is a virtual tie with City Council Speaker Christine Quinn.

Weiner, who a month ago was in first place, now is in fourth. Ex-comptroller Bill Thompson, who has been endorsed by Assemblyman Dov Hikind, is in third place.

Can a Bearded Candidate Become Mayor? Yes and No

Tuesday, June 11th, 2013

Bill de Blasio is not a Hasid, although he represented Borough Park in the city Council. Nevertheless, the NY Post took issue with the mayoral hopeful getting rid of his beard as soon as he was considered a serious candidate for mayor.

“As a Brooklyn councilman, de Blasio sported a beard when elected in 2001, taming it to a rakish mustache and goatee by the time he was public advocate in 2010. Just a year later, he made his smooth transition,” the Post noted.

“I didn’t leave my beard — my beard left me,” de Blasio told The Post, explaining that it was vanity, not politics, that led him to shave it off. “I started to notice flecks of gray . . . and I didn’t like the look,” de Blasio admitted, adding he “immediately felt younger after the shave.”

Experts said de Blasio’s close call makes sense, because conventional wisdom says facial hair doesn’t cut it in politics.

“In modern times, it makes the general public wince,” said political consultant George Arzt, who worked on de Blasio’s campaign for public advocate. Voters find facial hair “untrustworthy,” he added.

However, Arzt cautioned, “you can’t keep switching off from beard to mustache and goatee to nothing — then you don’t have a steady image of that person. That could work against him.”

Which raises the question: can a candidate with a beard become mayor of New York City? Maybe that’s why Joe Lhota, the Republican favorite, is considered a long shot. Joe Lhota — is the lone bearded candidate in the race. The last bearded mayor of New York City was William Gaynor, who served from 1910 to 1913. He was also the only mayor targeted by an assassin; he survived being shot in the throat in 1910, but died three years later.

“Having facial hair is not a determent,” Lhota declared to The Post. “I have no desire to shave it. That’s not going to happen. Plus, Republicans can get away with it more than Democrats, because they have this image of being self-made people.”

And Arzt confirmed to the post: “if anyone can pull it off, Lhota can, because the beard is part of his personality.”

Mayoral Candidates Salute Israel and NY Jews

Monday, June 3rd, 2013

More than 35,000 marchers and 17 bands marched Sunday with New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the city’s mayoral candidates in saluting Israel and the Jewish community in New York.

Mr. Weiner, who is the only Jewish candidate running in the Democratic primary, was cheered by many marchers and onlookers, but many also booed by some who still remember the Twitter scandal. “This is a great day,” the candidate said as he marched, according to Politicker. “Before I stepped aside, I had come to this parade every single year. It’s one of [the] real joys of my schedule, so it’s great to be back.”

“Am Yisrael Chai! Am Yisrael Chai!” he bellowed every few feet. “God bless America! Am Yisrael Chai! Welcome to New York!”

Bill de Blasio. Photo: Jacob Kornbluh

Bill de Blasio. Photo: Jacob Kornbluh

Joe Lhota. Photo: Jacob Kornbluh

Joe Lhota. Photo: Jacob Kornbluh

JPress Forum: Metzitzah B’peh, Vouchers, Weiner Charms the Crowd

Friday, May 31st, 2013

Appearing for the first time with all of his Democratic rivals on stage, Anthony Weiner sought to stand out, for the second time in a row, ahead of his competitors. At a Jewish Press mayoral forum in Manhattan Beach, Mr. Weiner claimed to be the first to oppose Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s regulation on the traditional practice of Metzitzah B’peh.

“I first spoke about Metzitzah B’peh when I ran in 2005,” Mr. Weiner said at the first forum on issues relating to the Orthodox Jewish community. “I was trying to get anyone possible to talk about it in the context of that campaign because, you know, this didn’t start last week,” he said. ”This has been going on for years now, that this battle has been going on, and for me it comes down to my values as someone who believes in the ethos of New York.”

Adding, “Part of that ethos of New York is we all come from different places, we bring different cultures, we bring different ideas, and we are never too far from our mother country. We try to bring those traditions here and that’s very, very important and part of the fundamental structure of the frum community.”

Mr. Weiner was quoted in the Jewish Forward during his first run for mayor, in 2005: “It is not the place of the Department of Health to be deciding on a religious practice. I am troubled, based on the facts of this case, about whether or not the city has overreached here.”

In comparison to Mr. Weiner walking around the issue, the remaining candidates directly addressed the issue at great concern to the frum community. Sal Albanese and Bill de Blasio promised to review the issue and discuss the matter with the rabbis and community leaders in order to find common ground. Speaker Christine Quinn defended the consent form requirement as a balance between religious freedom and public health concerns. John Liu and Rev. Erick Salgado were the only candidates to pledge to discontinue the city’s anti-Metztitzah B’peh regulations.

There are not many issues the Democratic mayoral hopefuls agree on, especially when they are seated at one table. However, on the one issue that is of great concern to the Jewish community, amid the high cost of tuition and transportation, all of the candidates held hands together in opposing school choice vouchers or tax credit relief.

At The Jewish Press forum in Manhattan Beach Wednesday evening, none of the viable candidates seeking to succeed Mayor Bloomberg expressed their support for some kind of relief to struggling parents who are not willing to enroll in the public school system.

In a previous conversation with this reporter, Republican mayoral hopeful Joe Lhota promised to fight hard for school choice vouchers if elected. “The mayor can use the bully pulpit to advocate in Albany for private schools,” he said. “It’s important that our children are properly educated. The role of the government and the role of the state is making sure they have the proper textbooks, making sure they are secure and making sure that they have transportation. The children that go to parochial schools and yeshivas are residents and the children of taxpayers in the city of New York, and they are not getting their fair share,” he asserted.

“On the issue of tax credits, I have been in favor of that. I have yet to find a way that it would cover the full tuition, but some form of a tax credit, to give relief to parents who pay for property tax as well and all the other taxes in New York, and are also paying tuition,” Mr. Lhota proclaimed.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/jpress-forum-metzitzah-bpeh-vouchers-weiner-charms-the-crowd/2013/05/31/

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