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April 28, 2015 / 9 Iyar, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘Binyamin Netanyahu’

Obama Claims Netanyahu Offered ‘No Viable Alternative’ to Iran Deal

Wednesday, March 4th, 2015

U.S. President Barack Obama sat in the Oval Office surrounded by media, his body tense, prepared to rebut Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s speech to the Congress barely two hours after the event.

After a perfunctory acknowledgment of the points which America shares with Israel – the “unbreakable bond” between the two, etc. – Obama went straight to the point.

Netanyahu, he said, had “nothing new” to sell in his points about the Iranian nuclear threat.

“On the core issue, which is how do we prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon which would make it far more dangerous … the prime minister didn’t offer any viable alternatives,” Obama told reporters crowded into the Oval Office as he met with newly appointed Defense Secretary Ashton Carter.

“We don’t yet have a deal,” he said. “It may be that Iran cannot say ‘yes’ to a good deal. I have repeatedly said that I would rather have no deal, than a bad deal.

“But if we are successful in negotiating, then in fact this will be the best deal possible to prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon.

“Nothing else comes close.”

Really?

Although the president said he “scanned” the transcript of the prime minister’s speech, one has to wonder whether he actually, really read it.  To claim that Netanyahu offered “no viable alternative” to the current agreement being negotiated was painting a swathe with a rather broad brush, to say the least.

Here’s the “viable alternative” that Israel’s prime minister came up with, and brought to the U.S. Congress on Tuesday:

“Nuclear know-how without nuclear infrastructure doesn’t get you very much. A race car driver without a car can’t drive. A pilot without a plan can’t fly. Without thousands of centrifuges, tons of enriched uranium or heavy water facilities, Iran can’t make nuclear weapons. Iran’s nuclear program can be rolled back well-beyond the current proposal by insisting on a better deal and keeping up the pressure on a very vulnerable regime, especially given the recent collapse in the price of oil….

“We can insist that restrictions on Iran’s nuclear program not be lifted for as long as Iran continues its aggression in the region and in the world… Now, if Iran threatens to walk away from the table — and this often happens in a Persian bazaar — call their bluff. They’ll be back, because they need the deal a lot more than you do. And by maintaining the pressure on Iran and on those who do business with Iran, you have the power to make them need it even more.

“My friends, for over a year, we’ve been told that no deal is better than a bad deal. Well, this is a bad deal. It’s a very bad deal. We’re better off without it. Now we’re being told that the only alternative to this bad deal is war. That’s just not true. The alternative to this bad deal is a much better deal.”

Netanyahu added that the deal currently being negotiated could, in fact, even spark a nuclear arms race “in the most dangerous part of the planet. This deal won’t be a farewell to arms. It would be a farewell to arms control. And the Middle East would soon be crisscrossed by nuclear tripwires. A region where small skirmishes can trigger big wars would turn into a nuclear tinderbox.

“If anyone thinks — if anyone thinks this deal kicks the can down the road, think again. When we get down that road, we’ll face a much more dangerous Iran, a Middle East littered with nuclear bombs and a countdown to a potential nuclear nightmare.”

Some Democrats Aim Venom, Charge Israeli Prime Minister with ‘Fear-Mongering’

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015

In a stunning, nearly unbelievable attack by what has been a traditional base of support for the Jewish State, Democrats gathered Tuesday to attack Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu following his speech to Congress.

A cluster of 56 Democrats boycotted the historic address to the legislators and it is unclear how many of those even bothered to watch a broadcast of the speech.

President Barack Obama himself said he personally was involved in a conference call with “European partners” but had scanned a transcript. No one at the White house watched the speech, according to reports.

None of that stopped a group of Democrats from gathering to launch a fierce media attack on the prime minister as soon as the speech was over.

Representative John Yarmuth of Kentucky accused Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu on Tuesday of “fear-mongering” and called Israel’s top leader a “child” in “Disneyland.”

Netanyahu was likened to “Dick Cheney” and told that Democrats “resented him sharing his views” in what they described as a “condescending manner.”

Reaction by Democrats and Republicans that followed in sites online, however, was swift and equally venomous.

“I wish we had such a leader here in America!” wrote one reader on The Gateway Pundit. “America stands with Israel!”

Another observed, “The oh so tolerant Democrats hate any views expressed that are not their own.”

It’s an odd position for Democrats to be in, particularly Jewish lawmakers who are in a double bind, opposing their commander-in-chief or their natural Jewish constituency.

An “unscientific” survey conducted by the American Jewish Congress over the past week determined that 72 percent of self-identified American Jews believe Netanyahu was right to come and speak to the Congress on Tuesday.

So Democratic lawmakers will also have to take that finding into account when they stump for votes in 2016 as well: most of those polled form their natural constituency.

Now the question is, how many Jewish Democrats have been offended by Democratic disrespect to Israel’s prime minister?

Netanyahu’s Speech to Congress on Iran to Bring ‘Substance, Not Politics’

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

Former Israeli Ambassador to the United Nations Dore Gold told CNN on Monday that Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu is intent on getting his message across about the danger facing Israel from Iran.

Basically, it’s the nuclear threat – not the Israeli elections or partisan issues or friction with America – that Netanyahu has come to the United States to talk about, media rumors and extraneous “other” comments notwithstanding.

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power told participants at the packed AIPAC convention Monday the U.S. “will not let Iran have a nuclear weapon, period.”

But it’s really not that simple, as Gold pointed out to CNN. To date, no nation has had any real control over Iranian activities, as has been patently obvious to the United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency, as reflected in its annual reports, regardless of international inspections and agreements and understandings signed or not signed.

Israel, perhaps more than any other nation, is exquisitely aware of this, since it is Israel’s existence Iran has threatened to snuff out.

“When the prime minister speaks to Congress tomorrow, his speech will have substance no one has heard before,” Gold said, “and he will put it on the table. The political systems in both countries will discuss it. In democracies, that is not odd.”

As for the current difficulties between the United States and Israel, Gold appeared unruffled.

“Differences with allies is not new,” he said. “It happens between the U.S. and Britain… and now with Israel and the U.S.”

Despite the tensions caused by the prime minister’s decision to go ahead with his speech to Congress on Tuesday, said Gold, “We have to do it.

“Look for substance. Don’t look for politics. The substance is there.”

Netanyahu at AIPAC: ‘US-Israel Alliance is Sound’

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu warned a packed room Monday in Washington DC that a deal between Iran and world leaders could “threaten the survival” of Israel, saying “I have a moral obligation to speak up… while there is still time.”

Netanyahu explained in his speech to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), that just as leaders of the United States worry about the security of America, so too “Israeli leaders worry about the survival of their country.”

Israel’s top leader repeatedly emphasized that he did not intend to jeopardize the relationship between the Jewish State and the United States. That was never the issue, he said, nor does he believe it is an issue today. “Our alliance is sound,” he assured those gathered.

In fact, the prime minister opened his speech with the point, to make it clear to anyone who might have doubts, that his only goal is to make sure that Israel’s citizens are kept safe.

The prime minister said plainly, “I deeply appreciate all that President [Barack] Obama has done for Israel. I am deeply grateful … and so should you be… My speech is not intended to show any disrespect to President Obama or the esteemed office that he holds. I have great respect for both.”

The prime minister said the news of the “demise of the U.S.-Israel relationship is not just premature – they’re just wrong.”

“The last thing that I would want is for Israel to become a partisan issue,” Netanyahu said. “Israel has always been a bipartisan issue, Israel should always remain a bipartisan issue.”

But the prime minister made it crystal clear that Israel would defend itself in any way necessary to ensure the survival of its people. “No one makes alliances with the weak,” Netanyahu said. “We defend ourselves … today we have a voice … I plan to use that voice.”

Meanwhile, a weary-looking U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry responded in a somewhat exasperated tone: “We will not accept a bad deal. We have said no deal is better than a bad deal. Any deal we would agree to, would make … especially Israel, safer than it is today,” he told CNN in response to Netanyahu’s speech via video hookup.

The problem, of course, is the definition of what a “bad deal” is, and how that might affect Israel’s national security.

Israel and the U.S. do indeed agree on the goal, said Netanyahu: both wish to avoid empowering Iran with the capability to build and use atomic weapons. “But we disagree about the best way” to achieve that goal, Netanyahu said.

Israeli PM Netanyahu Arrives in US to Speak at AIPAC, Congress on Iran

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu arrived Sunday in Washington ahead of his scheduled appearances at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee annual convention, and subsequently before the U.S. Congress.

Netanyahu is expected to speak about the dangers of allowing Iran to achieve the ability to complete its creation of an atomic weapon.

“The White House did not want Mr. Netanyahu to give this speech,” at least three television networks said bluntly during newscasts on Sunday night. The Israeli leader was invited to speak to the Congress by House Speaker John Boehner, all news anchors noted.

Netanyahu has said he will make his case for stopping the Iranians from achieving their goal both at the AIPAC podium and again before the U.S. Congress on Tuesday. The issue is critical to Israel, which faces an existential threat if the deal currently on the table is signed by Tehran and world powers led by the United States.

During his speech to Congress, Netanyahu will reportedly reveal Israel’s knowledge of the details of the agreement on the table being discussed between world powers – led by the U.S. – and Tehran. A senior official traveling with the prime minister spoke with CNN, saying, “The prime minister is going to explain what they don’t know about this agreement is that it is a bad agreement.”

Netanyahu’s speech is seen as a last-ditch attempt to make America’s lawmakers understand the danger facing not only Israel, but their own nation and the rest of the world as well, before a March 24 deadline for inking any agreement with Tehran is reached.

House Speaker Boehner Says Netanyahu Speech Won’t Harm US-Israel Relations

Friday, February 27th, 2015

Speaker of the House John Boehner hit back on Thursday at U.S. National Security Adviser Susan Rice, who characterized next week’s address to Congress by Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu as “destructive.”

Boehner challenged her remarks, saying that in fact, the situation was quite the opposite.

“The president’s national security adviser says it’s destructive for the prime minister of Israel to address the United States Congress,” Boehner told reporters on Thursday.

“I couldn’t disagree more. The American people and both parties in Congress have always stood with Israel and nothing, and no one, could get in the way,” Boehner said.

The invitation by the Speaker came directly, without a first pass by the White House or the State Department, which presidential staff members have censured as a breach of protocol.

The prime minister maintains that Iran’s skyrocketing nuclear development and the pending agreement being arranged by the United States and world leaders with Tehran presents Israel with a clear existential threat. As such, Netanyahu said he cannot afford to pass up an opportunity to directly discuss the danger to Israel with America’s lawmakers.

Rice said Tuesday the prime minister’s acceptance of the Speaker’s invitation to address the joint session of Congress on March 3 is “destructive of the fabric of the relationship” between Israel and the United States.

“What has happened over the last several weeks, by virtue of the invitation that was issued by the Speaker and the acceptance of it by Prime Minister Netanyahu on two weeks in advance of his election, is that on both sides, there has now been injected a degree of partisanship,” Rice said.

Boehner disagreed, saying, “What is destructive in my view is making a bad deal that paves the way for a nuclear Iran. That’s destructive.”

The Speaker insisted that it is important for the American people to hear what Israel’s prime minister has to say about the grave threats Israel faces.

“I’m glad that most of my colleagues, Democrats and Republicans, will be there” to hear it, Boehner said.

Both Rice and U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Samatha Power, are expected to address the AIPAC annual convention which begins on Sunday, and where Netanyahu is also scheduled to appear.

US Media Asks, ‘Did Israeli PM Deliberately Mislead UN on Iran?’

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015

Some of America’s broadcast news media headlined with a startling question on Tuesday: “Did Israel’s prime minister deliberately mislead the United Nations about Iran’s ability to build a nuclear weapon?”

That question and similar leads and headlines on broadcast news networks in the United States are starting to look like an active, open campaign to discredit Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu — and possibly delegitimize the State of Israel — ahead of Netanyahu’s trip to Washington DC next week.

That particular question was asked on CNN in reference to an alleged disagreement between Israel’s international intelligence agency, the Mossad, and the prime minister over the estimated time necessary for Iran to be able to cross the threshold to become an international nuclear power.

It’s an old story that made the news and was put to rest in Israel literally months ago, one that was more a matter of semantics than anything else, as CNN correspondent Nick Robertson in London quickly made clear.

Robertson wisely reported on the truth of the matter, pointing out that the Mossad stated there was “no daylight between the view of Mossad and the prime minister.”

Apparently a briefing sheet distributed to reporters included an unclear point on “item 9” he said, which “someone has chosen to deliberately undermine the prime minister when he goes to the United States next week.” (ed: italics added)

Just a day earlier the same news media outright ignored a major verdict handed down in New York federal district court, ending a 10-year-long lawsuit by 10 families of victims of terror against the Palestine Liberation Organization and the Palestinian Authority.

The court found in favor of the plaintiffs, deciding the PLO and the PA are civilly and financially liable for the injuries and deaths of American citizens in six terror attacks between 2002 and 2004 overseas. Damages in the amount of $655.5 million were awarded to the plaintiffs, to be paid by the PA and PLO.

It was a record-making, landmark decision — and not one television news network covered the story. To its credit, the New York Times headlined the bulletin within seconds after a verdict was reached.

But where were the broadcast news networks with their “Breaking News” bulletins? They were right there when it came to questioning whether Israel’s prime minister “deliberately misled the United Nations on Iran’s ability to build a nuclear weapon.”

But some of America’s mainstream broadcast news media seem to be “missing in action” when it comes to reporting on what is really happening in the Middle East — at least when it comes to Israel, Iran and the Palestinian Authority.

Let’s hope America’s viewers are more savvy — and demanding — and switch to media where they can find more accurate coverage of events in the Middle East.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/us-media-asks-did-israeli-pm-deliberately-mislead-un-on-iran/2015/02/25/

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