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September 16, 2014 / 21 Elul, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘boat’

Crossword Puzzle – Famous Jewish Websites

Friday, November 5th, 2010

Across

1. Fool

4. Talking flyer

9. Woodwork tool

12. Keats’s work

13. If ___ ___ say ___ myself

14. Fool

16. Social website for a frightened prophet?

19. Containers for Noah and Indiana Jones

20. Mr. Blue Sky band

21. Airport letters

22. Music website for an Amora?

28. Eve, once

31. Bar or bath

32. Rcp. amount

33. Tokyo, once

34. Flammable clothing, in a rhyme

36. ___ off

40. Long time

41. That gal

42. Fugitive locale

45. Columbus or W. End

46. Pet annoyance

48. Datan or Aviram, once

50. Title for an important 1 of 100 (abbrev.)

51. Mai __

54. Female avodah zarah figure of Egypt

55. Attempt

56. Video website for a fruity day

61. Allows

62. Can metal

63. Sandwich or Sussex

67. Search website for a rebellious kohen?

73. Unlocks

74. Boxer, to some

75. Former Virginian general

76. Anger

77. Where many Pharaohs can be found

78. Common Yellowstone fauna

 

Down

1. Sitting site

2. Costume month

3. Kiss

4. Smith- Jones sci-fi flick

5. Much ___ About Nothing

6. Corp. big shot

7. Pose

8. Interested bachelor

9. Happening

10. Kiddush liquids

11. Detest

14. Job in Hebrew (et. al.)

15. Type of Asian cuisine

17. 6th sense

18. Digs

23. Middle-Eastern serpents

24. Boat builder

25. Hamlet’s kinsmen

26. Choose

27. Many a NYC address part

28. Great Barrier ___

29. Sacreligious rocker Billy?

30. T or Funny

35. Saul Hudson, now

37. Direction to daven, when in New York

38. Eternity word before and after “and”

39. Disavow

43. Tel or Nofei

44. ___ Verde National Park

47. Sprint alternative letters

49. Airport code in Portugal

52. Cars

53. Bibliography abbreviation

56. Stringed toy

57. Kosher animal with stripes

58. Groomsman

59. Make into law

60. Party drink?

64. Competent

65. Film spool

66. Rosh Hashana vegetable

68. The loneliest number

69. Founder of the People’s Republic of China

70. A limb

71. Kernel place

72. Amazing Race network

 

(Answers, next week)

Crossword Puzzle – Prime Numbers

Wednesday, August 4th, 2010

 

Across

1. 1

6. 2

11. Cheat

14. Dramatic or situational

15. Boat for an Eskimo

16. Fib

17. Primitive

18. Actress Jessica

19. Get a wrinkle

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20. Norse prose

21. Famous Italian Mount

22. Extinct Russian

23. 3

25. Setting for this puzzle

28. Car part

31. It is charged

32. 4

33. 5, 7

38. Mine output

39. Curie of note

40. Williams who could really hit

42. 6

45. Like one in exile

47. Santa ___

48. 8

49. Puts forward

52. Noah’s Ark, e.g.

53. 9

54. 10, 12

56. Major European river

60. Consumed

61. One to respect

63. 11

64. What you might call a dog

65. Gazes at

66. See 68-Across

67. Ambulance letters

68. With 66-Across, The referrals to the “Primes” in this puzzle

69. Almost

 

Down

1. Have a meal

2. Israeli desert city

3. Not occupied

4. Like many of the claims made against Israel

5. Color

6. ___-vitamins

7. Known Sultanate

8. Holiest of “hills”

9. Old witch

10. Get by

11. Doughnut feature

12. 3.5?

13. Equal

21. Second first name

22. Hyperbolic function for tangent

24. Letters to make “mors” more loving

26. Shoe fitting

27. Eden ___

28. The arrogant have a large one

29. Cheers cheer

30. Joy

33. Uh huh

34. Anger

35. Tiny or The Tool Man

36. Big bad bomb

37. Gambling game

39. Test for a doc. to be

41. Hamlet’s homeland (Abbrv.)

43. Tribal leader

44. ___ ledodi

45. One hit wonder band from the 80′s

46. Actual

48. Turf type

49. Important part of Succos?

50. Does as told

51. Major Jewish meal

52. Pop

53. Talking pig of note

55. Not his

57. Fancy auto

58. Drones or killers

59. Anything ___?

61. Tolkien creature

62. Romanian currency

63. Governing party in S. Africa

 

(Answers, next week)

It’s My Opinion: Freedom

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

A boat was intercepted in the Florida Straits on July 13. A surveillance plane spotted the vessel and directed the U.S. Coast Guard to intervene. The boat held a passenger who had fled the island of Cuba.He was parched and exhaustedand was said to have been adrift for weeks. Rescuers were shocked to see that the seven-foot craft was made of Styrofoam.

 

Since the Communist takeover of Cuba, thousands of desperate men, woman and children have flocked to the shores of Florida. Often they risk their lives in homemade and rickety crafts. Some are made of inner tubes tied together with rope. Others are makeshift rafts. One amazing “boat” was an old taxicab that incredibly was set afloat. Desperation seems to have inspired ingenuity.

 

What could drive an individual to make such a perilous journey? What could motivate a human being to put himself through such danger? The answer is compelling.

 

The quest for freedom is a powerful motivator. It can cause people to act in remarkable ways. Throughout the course of time, revolutions and uprisings, revolts and freedom movements have been sparked by this desire.

 

The United States of America was created as a bastion of freedom. The Founding Fathers understood how precious this concept really was. Cubans, as well as people from around the world, are aware of this and that is why they flock to our shores.

 

My family escaped the tyranny of Eastern Europe to come to America in the beginning of the 1900s. They came from shteiblach in Poland and Jewish enclaves in Russian cities. They suffered from state-sanctioned anti-Semitism and stifling government control. They had no prospects of improving their lot. They sought freedom from these injustices. They prospered in this country. Their story is the quintessential American tale.

 

It is quite ironic that without a fight, war or declaration of intent, America’s citizens have given up many of their hard-won freedoms. Without even noticing, freedoms of choice, finances, business and privacy have been compromised, many within the last year-and-a-half.

 

The idea of an all-knowing big government (that caused so many to run away from other countries) has incrementally been introduced here. We have exchanged the American idea of free enterprise, that gave us prosperity, for a bail-out mentality that has never worked in any of the places and times that it has been tried.

 

This seems to be an age that rewards incompetence. The same federal bureaucracy that faces a failing Medicare and Medicaid system has now taken on national health care. The same federal bureaucracy that suffered the debacle of an embarrassing “cash for clunkers” car exchange, now heads General Motors. The same federal bureaucracy that has suffered many breaches of security on its most sensitive computer data has now exposed all Americans to have their most personal and private medical records on a national data bank.

 

It is time to wake up. Freedom is a priceless commodity. The American people need to be aware of how easily it can be lost.

It’s My Opinion: “Be Careful Of What You Wish For”

Wednesday, September 9th, 2009

     Ariel Morales’ long-time wish came true. The 56-year-old Florida resident purchased a sailboat a few weeks ago.  Visions of fun and sun filled his mind.

 

     Recently, Morales went on what he thought would be an enjoyable solo adventure.  He headed to the Florida Keys to do some fishing. He never made it to his destination.

 

      A storm knocked him off course.  The sail snapped.  He ran out of gas.  He floated, lost at sea for five days.  Finally, he washed ashore in Lauderdale-by-the Sea.  Morales’s dream had turned into a nightmare.

 

     The adage to be careful of what you wish for, because it might come true, is an old and poignant warning.  There are countless people who spend a lifetime chasing an idea.  Many times, when the goal is finally met, the result is surprisingly disappointing.  

 

    There are shocking studies involving people who have won big money in various lotteries.  Invariably, they all seem to have come to the same conclusion.  They were better off before!  Apparently, Ariel Morales is not the only one who had his dream come true and then was sorely disappointed.

 

     Mr. Morales directed his boat to be towed to a junkyard.  He declared, “I don’t want it.”  He realized that the thing that he had desired for so long was not a sure path to happiness.

     With the upcoming New Year, it is human nature to make a mental list of the goals we would like to achieve and the dreams we hope to finally attain. Perhaps it would be wise to consider Morales’ experience and really put much thought into what we “wish for.”   

 

      Let me take this opportunity to wish my readers a Shanah Tovah, a Happy, Healthy, and Sweet New Year.  G’mar Chasimah Tovah!

Do You Know What Time It Is?

Wednesday, June 10th, 2009

Human nature is such that we tend to procrastinate the attainment of important milestones and goals, such as an education or a shidduch. This is so because we delude ourselves into thinking that we have all the time in the world.

 

But the years have a habit of sneaking up on us, and to our deep dismay we realize that the “boat” we thought was still docked has slipped away. But though we may have missed one “boat” there is always another to be found if we look and try hard enough.


 


Do You Know What Time It Is?


 


Our lives spread out in all directions,


Full of dreams and goals and human connections,


The attaining of which we put off, postpone,


Thinking that time is a commodity we own.


 


The clock goes on ticking, but we don’t hear,


Our world is young, so we have no fear


That the opportunities we have will cease to be,


To us the road is stretched out endlessly.


 


Yes, we have goals to achieve one day,


But what’s the rush, so what if we delay?


We’ll get to it soon; we can afford to wait,


So much time ahead, we won’t be late.


 


We’ll mail that letter; we’ll make that call,


We’ll get down to business, and give it our all.


But not today – why be stressed?


Tomorrow is when we’re at our best.


 


We so easily give ourselves permission


To postpone the work, the effort, the mission.


So with hardly a thought we set aside the task,


The importance of which we eagerly mask.


 


Too late, we come to realize


That while we do nothing, time still flies.


We turn around and there are no tomorrows,


Just unfulfilled dreams, regrets and sorrows.


 


But it doesn’t have to be this way,


Mourning the opportunities we let slip away.


Longing for what never came to be,


Because we couldn’t bother to face reality.


 


For each day bears the gift of a new beginning,


Where one can go from losing to winning;


By valuing our time and putting it to good use,


No wasting, no more squandering, no more abuse.


 


Instead each remaining moment must be treasured,


Used with great thought and carefully measured,


So that goals can be attained and relationships built,


And satisfaction and fulfillment replacing sad guilt.


 


You can’t look back, but you can look ahead,


And end the inertia and move forward instead,


And take those old dreams off the dusty shelves,


For Hashem helps those who help themselves.

Q & A: The Ten Sons Of Haman

Wednesday, March 31st, 2004
QUESTION: 1) Why were the ten sons of Haman hung with their father on the same gallows?
2) The listing of the ten names of the sons of Haman has three Hebrew letters printed in smaller size. What does that indicate? These two questions have been bothering me for some time.
Yitzchak Green
(via e-mail)
ANSWER: I believe you are the one who submitted this question once before, but due to its timeliness we will repeat the answers.The Yalkut Me’am Loez (Megillat Esther, ch. 14) states: Haman’s ten sons led the Hamanite attack and were therefore among the first to be killed. While the other dead were allowed to remain at the site where they were killed, Haman’s sons were removed so they could be hung as an example (to those who murder and who oppose the king.)

Esther appealed to the king, ‘I request that Haman’s sons be hanged upon the same gallows on which Haman was hanged. You yourself left his body hanging, and now it would be fitting to hang his sons next to him’ (Megillat Setarim, as cited by Me’am Loez ad loc.).

Rashi states that Seder Olam (chapt 29) explains that the ten sons of Haman were the ones who wrote a false accusation against Judea and Jerusalem, as it is written in Ezra (4:6): ‘And in the reign of Ahasuerus, in the beginning of his reign, they wrote an accusation against the dwellers of Judea and Jerusalem.’ What was the accusation? The Cutheans had slandered those who ascended from the exile during the days of Cyrus and had started to build the Temple. The construction was stopped. When Haman was promoted during the reign of Ahasuerus, he feared that those in Jerusalem would renew the construction; so the sons wrote, in the name of Ahasuerus, to the governors beyond the river to stop the Jews in Judea from building.

Among the sons who were hung were:

PARSHANDAtA (spelled with a small tav ?). He tried to destroy the Torah by stopping the reading and the learning of the Torah. The Torah is spelled with a ?.

PARMAshTA (a small shin ?). He tried to destroy the observance of Shabbos.

VAYzATA (a small zayin ?). He tried to destroy the observance of the major Jewish holidays which are celebrated on seven days.

The vav of Vayzata is very long. It is compared to the pole of a boat which the helmsman uses to push his boat away from the shore. The vav is elongated because all ten sons were hung up on this pole (Megilla 16b).

Haman and his sons and all the people killed were descended from Amalek, the ancient enemy of the Jews.

The letters of the word Purim ????? represent the following: The peh ? stands for Pesach; the vav – for ‘and Sukkot’; the reish – for Rosh Hashana; the yud – for Yom Kippur and the mem – for Mattan Torah, Shavuot. The miracle of Purim was performed for Israel in the merit of their observance of these holidays (Ta’amei Haminhagim, siman 878, Inyenei Megilla).

NOTE: Next week we will resume and conclude the discussion about Joshua and Rahab.

On The Way With New York Waterway

Friday, October 3rd, 2003

On a beautiful sunny day in the middle of August, my husband and I took an incredible boat ride around Manhattan Island. For two hours the noise and sounds of the city faded away while we enjoyed a relaxing, picturesque tour of New York’s historic landmarks and tourist attractions.

We departed from Pier 78 at 38th Street and 12th Ave. Getting to the pier was easy. After taking the train from Brooklyn, we picked up one of the many New York Waterway buses that travel throughout the city. Free of charge, these buses can be hailed at many of the city’s local bus tops.

Traveling up the Hudson towards the Palisades Highway, our New York born and bred tour guide, Tara, shared little tidbits of information about every area of the city we passed.

Did you know that 20 city street blocks make up a mile? Or that the 843 acres that make up Central Park were set aside in the 1800s because there was a fear that the city would be overrun by buildings?

We passed under the George Washington Bridge - one of 19 bridges we would pass under – and saw the “Little Red Light House”, brought here at the turn of the century. While traveling on the Harlem River, we stopped at the Spuyten Duyvil Bridge. This is a turntable bridge, which means it opens sideways, like double doors as opposed to a drawbridge, which opens vertically. We had to wait at the bridge for some time before it opened, as there is construction being done on the bridge and the crew had to be moved out of our way.

By the way, ”Spuyten Duyvil,” according to Washington Irving, means, “Spite the devil” in Dutch and is in memory of a Dutchman who swam across the creek to warn the Dutch that the British were coming.

Do you remember the old, red subway cars? They are being phased out of use and being shipped to Maryland to serve on the coast as a “barrier reef.”

Passing under the University Heights Bridge, we passed a boat dock that looked as if it belonged in the Florida Keys, not at the water border of Washington Heights.

As we continued along the Harlem River, we traveled under three bridges in succession. The first is the Washington Bridge, not to be confused with the GWB. This was actually the first bridge to be named after our first President. The next bridge was the Hamilton Bridge, named after the famed Alexander, who was killed in a duel by Aaron Burr. The last bridge in this area is the High Bridge, which used to be a pedestrian walkway, but is now closed to all traffic.

As we traveled past Yankee Stadium, I thought about how many times we had driven up this way going someplace else and how little time was spent exploring our own city.

Along the East River we traveled under the Ward’s Island Pedestrian Walkway - an interesting green structure that looks like a bridge that suffered a high school prank – all the steel girders seem to be missing.

We passed Hell’s Gate, City Island, Little Island and Roosevelt Islands - and you thought the only island around here was Manhattan. There are no direct roadways from the city to Roosevelt Island; the only access is by tram.

What struck us so often is how beautiful the architecture in the city is – on the water you get a clearer view of the buildings and a more comprehensive picture of a city that few would describe as beautiful.

As we passed the Lower East Side and Williamsburg, we made our way onto the deck of the boat. The view of the city at that point is breathtaking. Watching other boats speeding by, helicopters landing and the cars traveling over the bridges, you get an incredible appreciation of how massive the city is.

Passing Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty you can almost imagine how the thousands of immigrants who came into New York Harbor felt as they saw this magnificent statue for the first time and realized that freedom was in sight.

What kinds of people take this two-hour cruise? We met families, couples, and singles. Out-of-towners enjoying the city for the first time, in-towners spending a relaxing stay in a city they know and love. We heard French, German, Spanish and Dutch and English with a variety of American accents.

New York Waterways has a full line of cruises available – everything from 90 minutes around the city to two-day excursions along the Hudson. The boasts themselves are comfortable double-deckers with seating on both levels. The upper level features an open deck area with great views.

Reasonably priced with great service and a full snack bar at your disposal, these cruises are a great way to relax and enjoy this great state. For more information, visit their website at www.nywaterway.com

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/travel/on-the-way-with-new-york-waterway/2003/10/03/

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