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September 23, 2014 / 28 Elul, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘bombing’

Indian Police Find Motorcycle They Suspect Was Used in Bomb Attack on Israeli Diplomat

Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

New Delhi Police announced on Wednesday that they had recovered an abandoned red-colored motorcycle that they suspect was used in the bombing attack of an Israeli diplomatic vehicle on Monday. The motorcycle was recovered in South Delhi.

The police added that they have begun searching for the owner of the motorcycle, but have not identified any suspects.

Three Iranian Bombs Rock Downtown Bangkok

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

The three bombs that exploded in a busy Bangkok street Tuesday were intended for “foreign nationals” in Thailand, according to national police chief Priewpan Damapong. The blasts injured five people including a bombing suspect carrying an Iranian passport who blew off his own legs. Another Iranian suspect was arrested at Suvarnabhumi airport hours after the incident as he was about to leave for Malaysia. He is one of three suspects thought to be involved.

Thai TV news reports said the Iranian, carrying a black bag, first threw a bomb at a taxi after its driver refused to take him as a passenger. When police got to the scene, some reports said, he threw a second bomb that hit a tree and bounced back at him, blowing off both his legs. Other eyewitness accounts said he dropped the device. There are also unconfirmed reports that the house where the man was living may be storing further explosives.

State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said the U.S. was awaiting the results of investigations, and did not blame Iran directly. But she noted Monday’s incidents in India and Georgia, and recent “Iranian-sponsored” and “Hezbollah-linked” plots to attack Israeli and Western interests in Azerbaijan and Thailand.

Thai police have not yet divulged motives for the blasts, but the Israeli defense minister, Ehud Barak, directly accused Iran of exporting terror around the world. “The attempted terror attack in Thailand proves once again that Iran and its proxies continue to operate in the ways of terror and the latest attacks are an example of that,” said Barak.

He said Iran and its Lebanese ally Hezbollah were “unrelenting terror elements endangering the stability of the region and endangering the stability of the world.”

When Terror Victims Fall Through The Cracks

Friday, February 10th, 2012

The Second Intifada may have ended seven years ago, but countless Israelis injured during that harrowing period, and in the years since, continue to suffer. The Israeli government offers many of them compensation for their injuries, but its bureaucratic apparatus is sometimes slow to respond, the money is not always sufficient, and not all injuries qualify for compensation.

Which is why Ohr Meir U’Bracha was founded. Launched in 2002 by Liora Tedgi – a terror victim herself and the mother of 10 – Ohr Meir U’Bracha aims to help those falling through the cracks. “I was near the terrorist,” Tedgi told The Jewish Press, recalling the suicide bombing in Jerusalem’s Beit Yisrael neighborhood on March 2, 2002 that killed 11 and injured 50. “I was a few meters from him, and I have a lot of noise in my head and a lot of pressure. But I decided to help – to transform my suffering, to bring more energy, and help victims of terror.”

Today, among other projects, Ohr Meir U’Bracha distributes 500 care packages every week to the families of Israelis injured in terrorist attacks. Before Jewish holidays, that number can reach 600. “When both parents work and get a salary, it’s okay,” Tedgi said. “But – I’ll give you an example – the mother of Family X, who is a teacher, was in a bombing, and never came back home. Suddenly the father had to be a mother and a father with three little children. And then he had trouble at work. So he became depressed, and it’s like a [vicious] circle.”

Liora Tedgi standing beside Ohr Meir U’Bracha care packages.

It is families like these that Tedgi tries to help. “I give them food and also buy them washing machines, a refrigerator – anything that can help.” She also helps people find job training courses when necessary. Just the other week, her organization distributed 1,000 blankets to children affected by terrorism in “Operation Hot Winter.”

Currently, the organization provides 50 children daily with a hot lunch. One of Tedgi’s dreams is to start an after-school program for these children to teach them computer and other vocational skills, while also keeping them off the street. “She’d start this program tomorrow if we had enough money,” said Shoshana Shore, Tedgi’s administrative assistant.

Many Israelis blame their government for Arab terror – and Tedgi, of course, is aware of this opinion. But when asked if she ever considered political activism so that her organization would have less people to service, she answered simply, “I’ll tell you the truth. I don’t politica; I know how to help.”

Liora Tedgi will be in the United States from February 14-27. She can be contacted through office@terror-victims.org.

Syrians Bury Dozens of Suicide Bombing Victims

Sunday, December 25th, 2011

Thousands of mourners took part in a mass funeral for 45 people killed in twin intelligence agency compound bombings in Syria’ capital city of Damascus on Saturday. The attacks involved suicide bombers, the first such attack since opposition to President Bashar Assad’s rule arose in March.

An additional estimated 166 people were wounded in the attacks.  One took place in Damascus’ upscale Kfar Sousa district at 10:30 on Friday morning, when a suicide bomber detonated his explosive-laden car outside a military intelligence building.  The second attack took place a minute later at the gate of the General Intelligence Agency.

Relatives and friends of the deceased, loyalists of Assad’s regime, wore black garments and carried Syrian flags and pictures of the dead, chanting “Martyr after martyr we want no one but Assad,” according to a report by the Associated Press.  Coffins were draped with Syrian flags at the Omayyad Mosque, built in the year 715, the burial place of Crusader nemesis and former ruler of Jerusalem, Saladin.

All but six of the remains were identified.  Most of the victims were civilians, though some were security officers.  State television broadcast the funeral live on-air.

Assad’s administration responded to the attacks by saying preliminary investigations point to al-Qaida, further suggesting that the current battle with opposition forces was not a battle with reformers, but rather with al-Qaida terrorists.

For its part, opposition members said Assad himself could be behind the attack, which took place the day after a team of Arab League observers arrived in country to investigate Assad’s crackdown on resistance.  Anti-Assad forces also expressed concern that the recent attack would lead to a massive onslaught in central Syria.  Furthermore, reports from rebels indicate that Assad is inhibiting the work of the observers and causing delays for the team.

On Saturday, at least three people were killed in Baba Amr by shelling, with homes and stores set on fire.  Another four bodies were found dumped on the streets of Houla in the volatile Homs province, with indications they had been tortured.

Pro-Israel But Not Presidential

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011
Sarah Palin sure makes it hard for those who care about Israel to dismiss her out of hand. On her brief visit to Israel last week she said the kinds of things one expects to hear from passionate Israel activists at meetings and rallies, not from politicians – even those with stellar pro-Israel credentials – concerned with appearing wise and judicious and nuanced and even-handed.
In short, Palin doesn’t even make an effort to temper her infectious enthusiasm for Israel with the tiresome sort of political and diplomatic double-speak we’ve come to expect even from widely acknowledged friends of Israel like George W. Bush, let alone from timorous Jewish organizational leaders who get a bad case of the vapors whenever someone like Pastor John Hagee or the late Rev. Jerry Falwell – or Palin, for that matter – champions Israel from a biblical perspective.
Palin’s most quoted remark in Jerusalem was the question she put to MK Danny Danon – “Why do you [Israel] keep apologizing all the time?” Those eight words sum up Palin – her character, her personality, the reason people either love her or hate her – better than the thousands of articles, political discussions and books she’s inspired in the 32 months since John McCain ushered her onto the international stage.
Apologizing and the traits (hesitation, timidity, self-doubt) that usually inspire and accompany the act are utterly foreign to Palin’s nature – a fact that other times and under different circumstances might raise concerns about self-righteousness and intractability but that after 27 months of Barack Obama’s unnerving passivity comes across as a desperately needed tonic.
Appearing on Fox News’s “On the Record” with Greta Van Susteren shortly after her return to the U.S., Palin called her visit to Israel “a trip of a lifetime for Todd and for me,” explaining that I have such a love for Israel that it was wonderful to be there to have the opportunity to hear firsthand from the prime minister, to hear firsthand from Netanyahu and his family, what their concerns are, what their threats are, and how they want to know – they want to know that America is on their side.”
   Palin criticized the Obama administration for pressuring Israel to freeze building construction for, as she put it, “the Jews in their homeland” and said she “would have taken an opposite approach.” She described Israel as having made “concession after concession” while “facing threat after threat.”
A somewhat skeptical Van Susteren asked Palin how the U.S. could be more supportive of Israel than it already is, noting that “historically, the United States has stood side by side with Israel.”
Palin responded that “We need to be even stronger in our commitment to help secure Israel and to help in this peace process and not tell Israel that ‘The land that is yours, you cannot build on, you have to concede even more to the Palestinians’ . Why aren’t we putting our foot down with the other side and telling the Palestinians, ‘If you’re serious about peace, quit the shellacking and the shelling, quit the bombing of innocent Israelis.’ Look at the young Israeli family that was slaughtered in their house a week or two ago. Look at today, the bombing of those innocents at a bus station in Jerusalem. No! We need to be strong and. “
At that point Van Susteren interrupted and asked, So you take the harder line? You take the. “
Now it was Palin who cut off Van Susteren. “I would take the harder line. Otherwise, Greta, we’re just going to continue down the same path . For peace, for stability, we do need to take a harder line.”
So, does the Monitor stand by its March 11 assessment that Palin is unqualified to be president? Unfortunately, yes. And it really is unfortunate, because on a visceral level the Monitor appreciates Palin’s unabashed support of Israel – and of course nothing would poleax the arrogant liberal media quite like a Palin victory over Obama in the 2012 presidential election.

But when conservatives as diverse as Peggy Noonan and David Frum and Charles Krauthammer and George Will and Kathleen Parker – just part of a list that keeps getting longer – agree that Palin isn’t presidential material and that she would almost certainly lose to Obama in a landslide, it’s as good an indication as any that the GOP needs to look elsewhere for a candidate who can send Obama back to Chicago.

 

Jason Maoz can be reached at jmaoz@jewishpress.com

Rav Eliyahu And Jewish Unity: A Personal Reflection

Wednesday, June 16th, 2010

What could I possibly write to justly summarize the magnitude of my/our dear rabbi, the Rishon LeTzion Rav Mordechai Eliyahu, zt”l? I can’t believe I am actually sitting and writing about him in the past tense.

I met Rav Eliyahu about a month before I joined the IDF. There had been a bombing on one of the buses in Tel Aviv the day before and the entire country was depressed. I had heard a lot about him before meeting him, but the way he spoke about every Jew lost in that terrible bombing joined me to his personality.

Two hours later I walked out of his house a completely different person. I was able to grasp that truly great people actually live among us. It wasn’t his fancy chief Sephardic rabbi garb or the number of people who came to hear his words that impressed me, but rather the aforementioned sensitivity and passion he had for every Jewish soul.

That awe translated itself into an ongoing learning relationship, an ongoing desire to emulate that care and love toward every other Jew in the world that was so evident in Rav Eliyahu. It was his guidance and personal attention that brought my wife, our (then) three boys and me to Vancouver, British Columbia; and it was his continued tutorship that helped us succeed in developing such a strong relationship with the Jewish community at large and teens in particular.

NCSY grew from 15 to 500 teens during our five years in Vancouver and it was Rav Eliyahu’s love of Jews that encouraged us to move halfway around the globe and connect ourselves to a community we had never heard of earlier, simply because it was a Jewish community.

We were on our way to my parents’ anniversary party when we received the terrible news of Rav Eliyahu’s death; for our own safety I probably should have stopped the car but I decided to turn around and drive back home. I sat crying by my computer and started watching video after video of my conversations with the rav. I am not sure why I filmed them, but I’m really glad I did.

More than 100,000 Jews from every segment of life in Israel came to Rav Mordechai’s levaya on five hours’ notice. I don’t know how many people in the world merit to witness such unity at their funeral.

In a conversation between Rav Eliyahu, his sons, a friend of mine and myself just three days before he had his first heart attack two years ago, he said, “We have more Torah today than ever in the history of the Jewish people. We have more chesed in the Jewish world than ever in the history of the Jewish people. We have more kosher food then ever in the history of the Jewish people. The one thing that we are missing is unity and that is what is holding back the Mashiach from coming!”

Rav Eliyahu cut the first snip of hair off all of my five older boys at their upsherin and was the sandek of my sixth son at the OU Israel Center. When watching the videos yesterday I came across the one in which he told me he felt I should take my current position as executive director of OU Israel.

It is almost four years since I took his advice and not a day goes by without my seeing firsthand the positive impact this organization has on Klal Yisrael and how it is, Baruch Hashem, connecting the Jewish people with each other.

I thank Rav Eliyahu for giving me his guidance and I hope to take his legacy, his Torah, his passion, his love and continue spreading them across the Jewish world. In his merit, let us leave all the fights aside and unite as one people.

The War Against Terror That No One Protested

Wednesday, January 7th, 2009

           The jets bombed the daylights out of them. The ground forces invaded. At long last the murderous suicide-bombing terrorists were being suppressed in a military campaign. Their total defeat put an end to any notion that the terrorists and their sponsors would be granted their own state. Many civilians were killed and wounded, yet not a single protest was made against the invasion anywhere.

 

I refer to the conquest over the past few days by the army of Sri Lanka (once called Ceylon) of the holdout city of the Tamil independence rebels. Kilinochchi was the last town held by the Tamil “Tiger” Rebels, a group considered a terrorist group by the United States. With it fell the last Tamil hope of setting up an independent state or even of getting autonomy inside Sri Lanka.
 
The Tamils do have their own state inside India but were not satisfied with that manifestation of “self-determination.” Kilinochchi, 579 kilometers north of Sri Lanka’s capital Colombo, was until recent months the center of political power for the rebels.
 
Over the years, 65,000 people have been killed in the war with the Tamils in Sri Lanka, almost all of them civilians.
 
Meanwhile not a single Solidarity-with-the-Tamil-Tigers protest has been organized on a single Western campus or in a single downtown square. Jewish leftists have not taken to the streets to demand an end to the war of aggression against the Tamils. Leftist websites have not proclaimed every injury of a Tamil civilian to be a Nazi-like war crime by Sri Lanka and an act of genocide.
 
The Eurocrats have not pontificated about how the Sri Lankan response to terror was out of proportion. The BBC did not describe the Tamil suicide bombers as activists. The International Solidarity Movement has not sent in protesters from the West to try to defend the terrorists. Communists and fellow travelers have not organized flotillas of boats carrying aid to the terrorists to “break the siege.”
 
Hundreds of non-governmental organizations claiming to be concerned about human rights have not rushed aid to the terrorists in the name of humanitarian concerns.
 
            And then there was the eerie silence of Israeli politicians. Not one of them chose to lecture the Sinhalese of Sri Lanka about how the whole problem is their insensitivity to the needs of the “Other.” None of them explained to the Sri Lankans that if they did not capitulate to the demands of the Tiger terrorists, really radical and implacable enemies of Sri Lanka would arise from among the Tamils.
 
Ehud Barak did not demand that the Sri Lanka government enter talks with the Tigers and provide them with guns and funding. Israeli professors did not organize petitions of solidarity with the Tamil suicide bombers. Columnists at the far-left Israeli daily Haaretz have not turned out column after column explaining that the Tamil suicide bombings are all about the Tamils living under an inhumane siege. Israeli literary stars David Grossman, Amos Oz and A.B. Yehoshua have not produced poems and essays urging that the demands of the Tamil Tigers be met.
 
Israeli Minister of Education Yuli Tamir did not suggest to her Sri Lankan counterpart that poems by Tamil terrorists be introduced as part of the school curriculum there or that they be taught that Sri Lanka’s very existence is a catastrophe and a crime.
 
Strangely, not a single Sri Lankan professor who had a family member killed by terrorists has endorsed their demands – unlike several such professors in Israel. Not a single Sinhalese public figure has proposed that Sri Lanka be dismembered and stripped of its Sinhalese symbols and flag.
 
No Sinhalese members of parliament have proposed a change in the national anthem. No one in Sri Lanka has proposed dividing Colombo and handing over half to the Tamils. The UN did not denounce Sri Lanka for misrepresenting the traditional Tamil drink of Ceylon tea as Sinhalese cuisine.
 
Virtually no one knows that 65,000 civilians have died in Sri Lanka’s fight with the Tamil terrorists – in fact, most people couldn’t even find the country on a globe. The Western media have shown no interest in covering the story. In the first week of fighting in Operation Cast Lead, the number of Gazans killed, most of whom were terrorists, was far less than 1 percent of the number of Sri Lankans killed in their battle against terrorism.
 
But then again, Sri Lanka is just not as advanced a country as is Israel. No one bothered to explain to the Sri Lankan leaders that there can be no military solution at all to the problem of terrorism and that the only choice is to hold talks and meet the demands of the terrorists.
 

Those silly, na?ve Sri Lankans ignored all the sage advice and just went ahead and solved their problem of terrorism with a military solution.

 

            Steven Plaut, a frequent contributor to The Jewish Press, is a professor at Haifa University. His book “The Scout” is available at Amazon.com. He can be contacted at  steveneplaut@yahoo.com.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/the-war-against-terror-that-no-one-protested/2009/01/07/

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