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October 21, 2014 / 27 Tishri, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘British Mandate’

British Mandate Boss Said Jews Were ‘Like Nazis’

Monday, April 29th, 2013

The British High Commissioner of Palestine viewed Jewish fighters there in the 1940s as analogous to Nazis, newly published records show.

On April 30, 1948, Alan Cunningham wrote to his superiors that as the Jews celebrated military successes, their “broadcasts, both in content and in manner of delivery, are remarkably like those of Nazi Germany.”

In another report, he said that the Jews were prepared for statehood and an “all-out offensive” with “all the equipment of a totalitarian regime.”

The reports were made public this week as part of a release of colonial administration records by the National Archives in London, the London Jewish Chronicle reported.

A week before the British departure from Mandate Palestine, the High Commissioner mistakenly believed that “all the ingredients of a successful truce were present,” the documents also showed. Cunningham wrote on April 30 that the Arabs’ “much vaunted liberation army” was “poorly equipped and badly led.”

He wrote, “In almost every engagement the Jews have proved their superiority in organization, training and tactics.”

Feiglin Wants Turkey Apology for Deaths of 766 Holocaust Refugees

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013

Turkey should apologize for the deaths of 766 Holocaust refugees whose Deputy MV Struma boat was sunk in February 1942 after the country refused to allow their boat to remain in port for repairs, said Knesset Member Moshe Feiglin.

The ship was towed away to the Black Sea, where it was a sitting duck for a mine or a Soviet torpedo.

Feiglin posted the demand on his Facebook page after Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s won an apology from Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu for the deaths of nine Turkish terrorists who clubbed and kidnapped IDF commandos trying to stop their boat from reaching Hamas-controlled Gaza in May 2010.

Erdogan also is demanding $ 1 million compensation for each of the nine terrorists killed in the clash.

Feiglin, who heads the Jewish Leadership faction of the Likud, wrote, “The truth is that we don’t need an apology. And also not financial compensation. The Jewish people have a special skill. They know how to remember.”

Jews piled on the ship in Romania in December 1942 but their journey to Israel, which was then under the British Mandate, was scuttled when the boat docked at Istanbul.

Britain refused to give the referees visa and Turkey refused to allow them to enter the country.

After two months of being stuck in the port, Turkey towed to the ship into international waters, where it was sunk either by a mine of by a Soviet torpedo.

In an account of the boat’s hapless voyage written in “The Legacy of Islamic Anti-Semitism,” Bernard Wasserstein wrote, “It was a rough night in the Black Sea on February 24, 1942. Ten kilometers or so from the shore, a 75 year-old, 240-ton converted yacht, carrying 767 Jewish refugees from Romania, exploded, probably after being hit by a torpedo, fired in error by a Soviet submarine.

“The vessel sank with the loss of all except one of the passengers. The Struma had left Constanza [Romania] on December 12, 1941, bound for Palestine. But on arrival at Istanbul three days later, her engine broke down and she was unable to proceed. While engineers tried unsuccessfully to restore the ship to seaworthiness, the Turkish and British governments wrangled about the onward passage of the refugees.

“The Turks refused to allow them to land unless they had guarantees of admission to some other country. The British refused to grant them certificates to enter Palestine. The failure of the two governments to agree culminated in the boat being towed out to sea and abandoned to the waves…

“The only force used in the episode was that applied by between one and two hundred Turkish policemen who overpowered resistance from the debilitated refugees and supervised the towing of the rotten, still engine-less hulk out beyond territorial waters. They then abandoned the passengers to near-certain death.”

Kaf-Tet B’November

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

On November 29, 1947 the United Nations voted in a plan for the partition of the British Mandate territory of Palestine. The plan came to be called the United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine or United Nations General Assembly Resolution 181.

The plan was approved by the United Nations General Assembly by 33 votes to 13, with 10 abstentions.The plan would have partitioned the territory of Mandatory Palestine into Jewish and Arab states, with the Greater Jerusalem area, including Bethlehem, coming under international control.

As we all know, the Arab countries, instead of taking the opportunity to build yet another Arab state, decided to attack and try to destroy Israel in the following May of 1948. The Arabs lost, and Israel began to expand back into its natural and historical borders, which continued on in 1967.

The Partition Plan wasn’t actually something to celebrate about, as previous international decisions, most notably the San Remo agreement and Balfour Declaration, had designated all of the Land of Israel for the Jewish People, and the decision of November 29th, actually stripped away significant parts of our country from us.

But still, for those alive at the time, it meant international recognition with practical applications under international consensus and law for creating a Jewish State. and they were willing to take whatever they could get.

In Hebrew, the 29th of November is more commonly referred to as “Kaf-Tet B’November”.

Searching a Greek Priest for Arms

Sunday, July 15th, 2012

The 1920 Jerusalem riots took place under British Mandate of Palestine on April 4–7, 1920 in and around the Old City of Jerusalem.

The events coincided with and are named after the Muslim Nabi Musa festival and followed rising tensions in Arab-Jewish relations over Zionist immigration. Concurrently, there were Arab attacks on Jewish settlements in the Galilee.

Speeches by Arab religious leaders during the festival led to an outbreak of violent assaults on the city’s Jews. Five Jews and four Arabs were killed and several hundreds were wounded.

Sheikhs of 82 villages around the city and in Jaffa, claiming to represent 70% of the Arab population, issued a document protesting the violence against the Jews.

The Palin Court of Inquiry sent to the region in May 1920 by the British authorities placed the blame for the riots on the Zionists, “whose impatience to achieve their ultimate goal and indiscretion are largely responsible for this unhappy state of feeling.”

The document was never published.

UN Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People Celebrated in NY

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

The United Nations Headquarters in New York convened the 34th annual International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People on Tuesday, holding events and welcoming international dignitaries.  The day coincides with the UN General Assembly resolution ending the British Mandate and adopting the partition plan to create a Jewish state.

 

The International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People was enacted by the UN in 1977 because of its “meaning and significance to the Palestinian people,” according to the UN’s website dedicated to the annual observance.

 

On November 29, 1947, the UN ratified Resolution 181, ending the British Mandate and establishing the UN Special Committee on Palestine, with the aim of creating a Jewish state and an Arab one.  The plan was accepted by future prime minister David Ben-Gurion and many Jewish organizations, though it was deemed insufficient and dangerous to long-term Jewish security in the region by Jewish liberation groups Irgun and Lehi.  Arab leadership rejected partition, claiming sole rights in the entire area.

 

The annual International Day of Solidarity features speeches from the Secretary-General, the President of the General Assembly, the President of the Security Council, and others, including “the Executive Committee of the Palestine Liberation Organization and President of the Palestinian Authority,” according to the website.

 

At this year’s meeting, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon called on Israel and the Palestinian Authority to agree on a two-state solution, and told Israel to “end the occupation that began in 1967”.  He also praised the PA for becoming “institutionally ready to assume the responsibilities of statehood, if a ‎Palestinian state were created,” and chastised Israel for building homes in eastern Jerusalem, Judea, and Samaria.  He reaffirmed that the UN “continues to be strongly committed to the population in Gaza”, and rejected rocket attacks from there into Israeli towns as “unacceptable and completely ‎contrary to Palestinian interests.”

 

Karen Koning AbuZayid, the Commissioner-General of UNRWA (the UN Relief Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East), sent a message to attendees urging them to “keep spirits alive” by realizing that “the vast majority of member states in this global body share Palestinians’ belief in the urgency of the need to bring an end to occupation and to exercise their right to self-determination,” and urged attendees to provide financial support to her staff of 30,000 people.  The 2010-2011 UNRWA budget was $1.2 billion.

 

Israel’s Ambassador to the United Nations Ron Prosor addressed the UN General Assembly, which convened to discuss Palestinian rights as part of the solidarity day.  Prosor accused Arab neighbors of Israel of “knowingly and intentionally [keeping] their Palestinian populations in the second class status of permanent refugees,” and asked the group whether Palestinians “are inspired by the promise of building a new state, or the goal of destroying an existing one.”

 

He also criticized the pro-Palestinian movement for continually demanding a two-state solution, despite a consistent lack of recognition on the part of Palestinian leadership of the right of a Jewish State to exist.  “If you ever hear a Palestinian leader say “two states for two peoples”, please phone me immediately,” Prosor said.  “My office has set up the equivalent of a 911 number in the event of such an unprecedented occurrence.”

 

Prosor chastised the UN for their lack of solidarity with Israeli victims of terror, and stated that the UN fails to stand with Palestinian victims in the region.  “I hear no solidarity with the Palestinians who are victims of brutal Hamas rule – with the political opponents who are tortured, the women who are subjugated, or the children who are used as suicide bombers and human shields,” Prosor said.

 

Congratulations and messages of support on the solidarity day were sent to the assembly by Chinese premier Wen Jiabao, King of Bahrain Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa, Sri Lankan president Mahinda Rajapaksa, United Arab Emirates (UAE) UN representative Ahmad Al-Jarman,  Indonesian representative to the UN Triyono Wibowo and others.

 

A special bulletin with the texts of the delivered statements and solidarity messages received on behalf of the day is published by the Division for Palestinian Rights of the United Nations Secretariat.  The Division for Palestinian Rights was established in 1977, following the creation of the UN Committee on the Exercise of the Unalienable Rights of the Palestinian People in 1975.  The Committee was established “to enable the Palestinian people to exercise their inalienable rights to self-determination without external interference, national independence and sovereignty; and to return to their homes and property from which they had been displaced,” according to its page on the UN website.  The Division was launched two years later “to create an informed public opinion around the world in support of the achievement of those rights,” and prints bulletins, studies, and publications dedicated to disseminating information about Palestinian rights.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/un-day-of-solidarity-with-the-palestinian-people-celebrated-in-ny/2011/11/30/

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