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April 17, 2014 / 17 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Brooklyn’

Weberman Found Guilty

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

Satmar Rabbi Nechemya Weberman was found guilty of 59 counts of sexual abuse in State Supreme Court in Brooklyn on Monday.

Sentencing is set to begin January 9. Weberman faces up to 25 years in prison for one of the charges and may face even more by the time the sentencing hearings are completed.

The trial hinged on the testimony of an 18-year old girl who said Weberman was abusing her for years while she received counseling from him, starting from when she was 12.

The NY Daily News reported that she testified that ”she was forced to perform oral sex and reenact porn scenes during closed-door counseling sessions that started in 2007.”

Weberman was not a licensed counselor.

The two-week trial was said to highlight how the Satmar community enforced its modesty and sexuality requirements.

The victim said she was referred to Weberman for counseling by her yeshiva because she broke modesty rules and asked critical theological questions.

The victim further testified that while she was under Weberman’s supervision, “I wanted to die,” the Daily News reported.

Weberman’s attorney Stacey Richman said the girl was a liar and that he would appeal.

The Satmar community also came under scrutiny throughout the ordeal because community fundraisers were held in support of Weberman and members of the community allegedly approached the victim seeking to pay her off to drop the claims.

Ex-Principal of Brooklyn Jewish School Convicted on Sex Abuse

Tuesday, December 4th, 2012

The former principal of a Jewish high school in Brooklyn was convicted on 75 counts of sexual abuse against three boys.

Emanuel Yegutkin, 33, was convicted Monday on all charges of sexual abuse stemming from his relationship with three boys between 1996 and 2005, including one who was 7 years old at the time.

Yegutkin faces up to 25 years in prison for the top charge of sexual conduct against a child in the first degree. He will be sentenced on Dec. 17.

Until his arrest in early 2009, Yegutkin served as the principal of Elite High School, a private school in the Bensonhurst neighborhood comprised largely of Russian-American students. Two of the victims were brothers; none were students at the school.

“This violent sexual predator faces the remainder of his life behind bars,” Brooklyn District Attorney Charles Hynes said. “This should serve as a clear message that those who would sexually abuse children in this county will be punished severely.”

Earlier this year, Hynes came under fire for his handling of prosecuting sex offenders in the haredi Orthodox community.

Prior to his arrest, Yegutkin also worked as a lifeguard at Oorah summer camp in upstate New York and as a volunteer paramedic for the Flatbush Hatzoloh ambulance service.

Rebbetzin Devorah, Wife of Lubavitcher Rebbe’s Aide Rabbi Yehuda, Laid to Rest

Monday, November 26th, 2012

Rebbetzin Devorah Krinsky, wife of chief aide to the late Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, passed away on Friday night at the age of 74.

Rebbetzin Devorah returned her soul to its maker after the Friday night Kiddush was recited at her bedside, surrounded by her husband, Rabbi Yehuda Krinsky – who still serves as Chairman of Merkos L’inyonei Chinuch and Machne Israel educational and social services – and their children.

Rebbetzin Devorah’s parents, Rabbi Zev and Etta Kasinetz, provided space for early Lubavitch work from their home in Brooklyn’s Brownsville in the late 1930’s and 40’s, according to an article in Chabad’s COLlive.

She was described by COLlive as the pillar of her home, and a constant partner in the work of her husband.  “Her warmth and humor, her quick wit, practical common sense, and her concern for others complemented her dignified comportment,” the article written on the  occasion of her death said.

Rebbetzin Devorah is survived by Rabbi Yehuda, her children Rabbi Hillel Dovid of Crown Heights, Mrs. Sheine Friedman of Crown Heights, Rabbi Menachem Mendel of Crown Heights, Rabbi Levi of Lubavitch of New Hampshire, Mrs. Chana Futerfas of Crown Heights, Rabbi Shmaya of Crown Heights, and her grandchildren and great grandchildren, as well as her brother Rabbi Moshe Kasinetz, founder of Suburban Torah Center in Livingston, New Jersey.

Rebbetzin Devorah’s funeral took place on Sunday at noon, leaving from Shomrei Hadas Chapels and passing by Lubavitch World Headquarters at 770 Eastern Parkway.  She was laid to rest at the Old Montefiore Cemetery in Queens.

The shiva house is located at 729 Montgomery Street in Brooklyn, and will be open from 11am on Monday through Friday.

COLlive listed prayer times at the home as follows:

Shachris: 8:00, 8:45, 9:30, 10:00

Mincha: 15 Minutes before sunset

Maariv: After nightfall

Those wishing to send condolences to the family are also encouraged to write to krinskyfam@gmail.com.

His Brooklyn Home Destroyed by Sandy, Singer Mordechai Ben David Is Making Aliyah (Video)

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

Only three days ago, popular singer and songwriter Mordechai Werdyger, known by his thousands of Orthodox Jewish fans as Mordechai Ben David, or just MBD, shot and distributed a video clip depicting the destruction of his neighborhood, Sea Gate, at the southwestern tip of Brooklyn, NY, in an effort to raise awareness—and donations—to rebuild this once thriving Jewish community.

The video starts at MBD’s basement recording studio, which has been totaled by the flood of ocean water—noting that the water only reached up to the level where pictures of famous rebbes were hanging. MBD then goes out to the beach, walking over the broken slabs of asphalt and concrete, surveying the astonishing damage.

Now rumor has it that MBD has decided to move to Israel, where he has purchased an apartment in a 330-unit residential complex being built at the T’nuva Compound, in the neighborhood of Romema, Jerusalem.

In what appears in hindsight as nothing short of a stroke of prophecy, Jewish Press Online blogger Tzvi Fishman, a devoted advocate of Jewish immigration to Israel, has called on MBD and others just this week to turn the misfortune of Sandy into an opportunity:

“Brothers and sisters of New York and New Jersey– rebuild your washed-out communities in Israel! Mordechai Ben David, Avraham Fried, and Shwekey – we have beautiful recording studios in Israel, as dry as can be! Instead of coming here for concerts on Chol HaMoed Sukkot and Pesach, come here to live, and give your holiday concerts in Brooklyn instead! It’s a lot safer living in Israel!”

And Fishman complains no one is listening to him…

Sandy’s Wrath Spurs Comprehensive Jewish Community Response

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

NEW YORK—Hurricane Sandy stormed into New York and New Jersey with unmitigated force, carrying death and destruction, disrupting lives, and devastating neighborhoods in America’s most densely populated regions – which happen to be home to some of the country’s largest Jewish populations.

In response, the Jewish community banded together to meet immediate needs and plan for a long-term revival.

Cheryl Fishbein, chair of the Emergency Committee of the Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA), told JNS.org Sunday that the Jewish Community Relations Council of New York (JCRC-NY) is working on insurance – or lack thereof – issues.

“We’re pulling together, recognizing that people have really been demolished,” Fishbein said.

“The entire community – religious, not religious, left to right, Chabad and secular, synagogues, organizations – everybody is under the tent, a tent that stretches as big as it can possibly be,” she said. “People need to know we’re out there, checking on one another, making sure everyone is safe.”

Carol Goldstein, president of the Marks Jewish Community House in the Bensonhurst section of Brooklyn, detailed the work being done by volunteers and staff. “I’m so proud to be part of an agency that exemplifies the Jewish belief we are responsible one to another,” she said.

Marks Jewish Community House Executive Director Alex Budnitsky, together with staff and volunteers, climbed innumerable flights of stairs, carrying meals and water to those trapped in high-rise apartments without electricity. Brooklyn’s Neptune Avenue, he said, “truly looked like a war zone.”

“I applaud the efforts of the volunteers of the community,” he said. “The response is unprecedented. People of all ages from all over Brooklyn have given their time, energy, knowledge, language skills and more to make sure care is taken of everybody from seniors to kids.”

Several Jewish communal organizations joined together to create the The Emergency Sandy Chesed. The fund will be managed by Chevra Hatzalah with the support of local Hatzolah groups, Shomrim, Misaskim, Chaveirim, Met Council on Jewish Poverty, Yad Ephraim and neighborhood Jewish community councils.

Volunteers from synagogues and Entwine, the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) young leadership program that usually works in eastern European Jewish communities, were on the ground in Brooklyn, according to Goldstein. The director of a clinic in Kharkov, Ukraine, asked how he could help Russian-speaking Jews in Brooklyn. Teens whose classes were canceled visited the elderly and calls were made to Holocaust survivors, she said.

Sigal Greenfeld Middelman arrived in New York just days before the storm. She is chaperon of the Israeli contingent of the America Israel Friendship League’s YASE (Young Ambassadors Student Exchange) program. Sandy, she said, created “a really awful situation.”

“I had to keep the kids calm and assure their safety – especially without electricity,” she told JNS.org. “Parents were worried – there was no phone service for days.” E-mail and Skype helped Middelman keep parents 6,000 miles away as calm as possible.

U.S. Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY), who represents several of the devastated Brooklyn neighborhoods, said Sandy should lead to a “massive reordering of priorities.” His district includes Sea Gate, a historic “gated community” that suffered massive wind and water damage. Many homes were entirely washed away. Rabbi Chaim Brikman of Chabad by the Ocean, which serves Sea Gate and Coney Island, said that Sandy “hit with about 10 feet of water.”

“Everything was destroyed – offices, classrooms, the library,” Rabbi Brikman said. “Somehow I had the intuition to bring all the Torahs to the upper floor – some are over 100 years old.”

Rivkah Brikman, the rabbi’s wife, stressed that the storm did not stop Shabbat. “Homemade food came from Crown Heights,” she said. “We gathered in one of only three undamaged homes. Even without heat, the warm feelings made it the most beautiful Shabbat ever.”

“This is a very loving community,” she added. “Everyone is helping one another – Jews and non-Jews: reaching out to one another. No hurricane will stop us.”

In Manhattan Beach, Congregation Shaarey Torah had 25 people in the shul, usually known as the Shtieble, on Shabbat morning braving the lack of lights and heat. In fact, Manhattan Beach, of all places, actually hosted refugees, as those without electricity were hosted in homes that were not affected by the storm.

Jewish Press Endorsements – November 6 General Elections

Thursday, November 1st, 2012

U.S. President

Last week we urged readers to support Governor Mitt Romney for president. Essentially we argued that Mr. Romney seems to be someone who can be relied on to nurture and enhance the special, decades-old U.S.-Israel relationship.

On the other hand, once freed from the dynamic of the American electoral process, President Obama, we fear, could well revert to his original stated position that “When there is no daylight [between the U.S. and Israel]…that erodes our credibility with the Arab world.”

For that reason, and because of the continued weak state of our economy, Mr. Romney is the preferred candidate.

U.S. Senate

In the race for the Senate in Massachusetts, we endorse Scott Brown (R) for reelection. He is a stalwart supporter of Israel and distinguished himself with regard to the Goldstone Report, calling attention to the deplorable human rights records of Israel’s enemies and urging severe and effective sanctions against Iran. In the Senate race in Wisconsin we support former governor Tommy Thompson (R). Thompson has long been vocal about his support of the Jewish state and has called for serious sanctions against Iran in order to thwart its nuclear program. Meanwhile, Thompson’s opponent voted as a congresswoman against the four major sanctions-expansion bills from 2006 to 2011. In the Ohio Senate race we endorse Josh Mandel (R), who in his currently position as state treasurer authored a law providing for the divestment of state pension funds from companies doing business with Iran and has been vocal in his support for an undivided Jerusalem and the right of Jews to build homes anywhere in that city.

U.S. House of Representatives (NY)

Grace Meng, 6th CD (Queens) deserves the support of Jewish voters. She is a vocal proponent of a strong Israel and will be a reliable friend in Washington. Though she is not prepared to completely dismiss President Obama’s record on Israel, she straightforwardly says he could have done more and been a better friend to the Jewish state and that she has problems with his “’67 lines” formulation. Hakeem Jeffries, 8th CD (Brooklyn, parts of Queens), in his interview with The Jewish Press editorial board, displayed a deep interest in foreign affairs and a keen understanding of Israel’s need for an undivided Jerusalem as its capital and why a return to the ’67 lines is not an option. He would be a valuable asset in Congress. Yvette D. Clarke, 9th CD (Brooklyn), has developed her views on the Middle East and has become a stalwart voice for accommodating Israel’s needs in Congress. Jerry Nadler, 10th CD (parts of Brooklyn and Manhattan) has always been there for Israel and the special needs of the Jewish community and is an important congressional presence. Elliot Engel, 16th CD (Bronx) has always been a staunch and key advocate in Congress for Israel and the Jewish community. In the congressional race in the 9th CD (Englewood, NJ) Rabbi Shmuley Boteach gets our support. Though he has gained notoriety as a celebrity rabbi, he possesses a formidable intellect and a deep grasp of a wide range of issues. There can be no doubt that when it will come to dealing with matters of concern to our community, he will be there for us.

New York State Assembly

Assemblyman Peter Abbate, 49th AD (Brooklyn), has delivered crucial services to the Jewish community in his district, including funding for senior centers and social services organizations. He has also been a leading advocate for giving rabbinical students access to the Tuition Assistance Program and has received an Outstanding Legislator award from the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty. Assemblyman Alec Brook-Krasny, 46th AD (Brooklyn), has more than earned reelection. He is the first Russian immigrant to serve in the Assembly and has been a great friend to the Jewish community in his district, helping to found the Council of Jewish Émigré Community Organizations, which has been a crucial resource for immigrant families. He has also supported programs that have lowered the cost of prescription drugs and helped toughen penalties for criminals who victimize the elderly. Assemblyman Steven Cymbrowitz, 45th AD (Brooklyn), has long been a strong voice for us and a staunch advocate for Jewish social service organizations that provide legal and financial services and help feed the hungry. The son of survivors, he has been a leader in educating children about the horrors of the Holocaust and has been a great friend to survivors and their families. Assemblyman Charles Lavine, 13th AD (Nassau County), is president of the New York Chapter of the National Association of Jewish Legislators. He has been a great friend to the Jewish community in his district and across the state on a variety of issues. A strong supporter of Israel, he helped lead the fight to pass New York’s Iran divestment law. Assemblywoman Catherine Nolan, 37th AD (Queens), is the chair of the Assembly’s Education Committee and is one of the state’s leading advocates for children, the elderly and the infirm.

Jewish Communities Among Dozens Decimated By Hurricane Sandy

Thursday, November 1st, 2012

“It’s like a war zone,” said Rabbi Akiva Eisenstadt, surveying the damage in Manhattan Beach, a day after Hurricane Sandy swept through New York. “It’s beyond anything anyone has ever seen.”

Manhattan Beach, on the southern tip of Brooklyn, was one of several communities in the tri-state area pummeled by the storm, which caused, across the eastern coast of the country, an estimated $20 billion in property damage and left at least 55 Americans dead and 8.2 million without power.

By Wednesday, Manhattan had still only partially recovered from the super storm as much of the mass transit system that transports millions into the city daily remained shut down. Some experts estimate it will take a week or more before service returns to normal.

Simply pumping all the water that flooded New York’s subway stations and tunnels may take several days. Engineers will then have to assess the infrastructure’s structural soundness. Some fear the corrosive salt water may have also destroyed electrical switches, lights, and the power-conducting third rail.

Metropolitan Transportation Authority Chairman Joseph J. Lhota said Tuesday, “The New York City subway system is 108 years old, but it has never faced a disaster as devastating as what we experienced last night.”

Even New York’s Stock Exchange remained closed Tuesday – its first multi-day, weather-related closure since 1888.

While most of the reports from several communities in New York City – such as Washington Heights, Midwood, Boro Park and Crown Heights – only weathered streets blocked by downed trees and power outages, others sustained a high percentage of homes with massive damage.

Shorefront areas in lower Brooklyn experienced catastrophe. “Two of my friends who lived in ranches lost everything they had,” said Ari Epstein, a resident of Manhattan Beach, where the water filled the streets up to six feet above street level. On Tuesday, after the water had receded, an oily muddy residue remained on every block. Virtually every house in the neighborhood, Epstein said, suffered extensive water damage, destroying furniture and myriads of expensive and sentimental household items. “It’s crazy, unbelievable.”

Rabbi Eisenstadt, who serves as rosh kollel of Manhattan Beach’s Community Kollel, said one waterfront house was on the market before the storm for $9.5 million. Now, “his whole property is destroyed.”

Even Hatzolah was powerless in the neighborhood. The rescue organization received at least two calls about electrical fires but could not respond, a Hatzolah member told The Jewish Press. The roads were simply inaccessible.

Sea Gate, Brooklyn sustained major damage.
(Photo credit: Dee Voch)

In nearby Sea Gate, an area that was similarly overwhelmed by water, one Jewish man survived the storm on top of a garbage truck, an official from the volunteer Chaverim organization reported. The man declined to evacuate when asked; by the time he changed his mind and started driving away, water blocked his path. Seeking higher ground, he spotted a nearby garbage truck and climbed on top of it. Freezing from the cold weather, he wrapped himself in his tallis, the Chaverim official said.

The water also filled parts of Woodmere and North Woodmere, on Long Island, where many homes were almost completely underwater and many residents had to be rescued by National Guard boats.

Summing up the conditions of the Five Towns, Gabriel Boxer, a resident of Hewlett, posted on Facebook: “The entire 5 Towns smells like salt water.”

In addition to the mass flooding and power outages, some suffered from storm-related fires. Rabbi Yossi Serebryanski said two cars exploded from downed electrical wires near his house in Canarsie, Brooklyn. Several other fires blazed on nearby blocks with fire trucks scrambling to get to them. Eventually, firemen took down several power lines to prevent further fires from erupting. Rabbi Serebryanski emptied his refrigerator and headed to relatives in Crown Heights, Brooklyn.

Fires also destroyed more than 100 homes in Breezy Point, Queens. Among them was the residence of Rep. Bob Turner (R-NY).

Bayswater, Queens also suffered greatly. Resident Annette Turner said she has no idea when she will be able to return home after the peninsula community was overwhelmed by water. Among the area’s victims was the Agudah of Bayswater, which was completely destroyed – just one week after the shul had finished repairing damage sustained in last year’s Hurricane Irene storm.

Glatt Mart to Save Your Frozen Food

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

Important Message from Glatt Mart on Avenue M in Brooklyn.

We’re opening up our freezers to help our neighbors that lost power. Bring your food in sealed boxes and we’ll place it in our freezer till your power returns or you need it.

This is a free of charge no obligation service. If you know of a bulletin to post on or can send a few texts to neighbors that might have been effected please forward. Hope everyone is safe and gets their power back as soon as possible. Thanks for helping.

Kol Hakavod!

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/glatt-mart-to-save-your-frozen-food/2012/10/31/

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