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April 25, 2014 / 25 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Bush Administration’

They're Laughing At Us

Friday, December 7th, 2001

As we and others have opined, the inclusion of Arab states that continue to harbor terrorist cells in the anti-terrorism coalition is seriously undermining the effort by signalling a political business as usual modus operandi. We have been equally critical of signs that the Bush Administration is agreeing to certain demands of Arab states in general in order to keep them in the coalition. Primary among the concessions was the recent public support expressed by President Bush for the establishment of a Palestinian state. Plainly, the Arab states think they are finally onto something in their effort to have the United States cut Israel loose. But the snickering that this has doubtless engendered seems about to turn into outright mockery if it hasn't already done so.

The big news in recent weeks has been the public Bush Administration displeasure with Israel's policy of “incursions” to root out the pattern of Palestinian shooting and bombing directed against Israelis. In response to Arafat's varying claims that he is either unable or unwilling to control it, Israel has entered and reoccupied both Area A and Area B territory and tamped down the violence. In our view the coalition politics which prompted U.S. opposition to this policy ? a policy which, of course, on its face makes perfect sense for Israel, if the goal is to stop the killing and maiming of its citizens ? has caused incalculable damage to our image as placing the eradication of international terror at the top of our agenda. A statement this week by U.S. Ambassador to Israel Dan Kurtzer regarding the incursion policy carried in a Reuters dispatch has highlighted the problem:

It's been our view that the right of self-defense, which Israel certainly has and no one challenges, should not be exercised with incursions into Area A.

What message other than one of kowtowing to the demands of our Arab coalition partners could account for the arbitrary carving out of an exception for Area A? Further, a front page story in Monday's New York Times reported on Administration gratification with supposed cooperation of some Arab states and emirates in the effort to restrict the movement of funds of terrorist groups. Here is a rather startling two paragraphs of the article:

The outcome, gulf and American officials said, may be a new partnership against terror in a critical Middle Eastern financial hub.

Ultimately, administration officials say, the cooperation of the Emirates, Saudi Arabia, and other nations in monitoring financial transactions may prove as significant as a special-forces strike or a new round of arrests.

The verifiability of this “cooperation” escapes us. But what is the world now to think about our resolve to militarily pursue and root out the terrorists around the world? What indeed?

Rudy To Washington

Friday, November 30th, 2001

The word circulating around usually well-informed parts of town is that President Bush will be appointing Mayor Giuliani to a very prominent position connected with the war against terrorism. Director of the CIA and Director of Homeland Security are the two posts most often mentioned. Because the Bush Administration is fast losing points in the polls and the confidence of the American public seems to be waning, we don't regard this as mere speculation. The trio that is now most publicly and prominently dealing with the terrorism problem ? Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson, Director of Homeland Security Tom Ridge and Attorney General John Ashcroft ? haven't been able to get their act together and are signalling disarray and aimlessness.

This is not all that surprising since there is little in the respective resumes of these political appointees to suggest that they bring anything special to the table in the way of expertise in combatting terrorism.

It would seem that the time is ripe for the Bush Administration to put politics to the side and appoint the one individual who has shown he can get us back on track. And that person is the Mayor of the City of New York, Rudy Giuliani. His appointment as the director of the CIA or Homeland Security would not only bolster the confidence of the American people ? something which is now so sorely needed. It would also send an unmistakable message at home and abroad that we are serious and we are up to the job.

The President And A Palestinian State: In Any Event,The Timing Was Wrong

Friday, November 16th, 2001

In principle, we disagree with the notion of U.S. public support for a Palestinian state. The record is clear that, whatever Yasir Arafat and his crowd may claim to the Bush Administration, the Palestinians have no present intention of living as a peaceful neighbor with Israel.

Indeed, the continuing demonizing, anti-Israel incitements and continuing violence can in no way be deemed consistent with a vision of an harmonious future. Plainly, it will take a generation or more to allow the venom to dissipate. And the bellwether of necessary change will be when an agreement will be freely arrived at around the negotiating table.

The establishment of a Palestinian state must be the product of a desire for normalcy and not artificial pressure. So President Bush's and British Prime Minister Blair's joint trial balloon of recent days is most unfortunate. It is all the more so, because it comes at a time when it will inevitably be looked upon by the Palestinians as part of an urgent effort to induce the Palestinian Authority to stanch the violence and to forge a coalition of opportunistic Arab states against international terror.

At his recent press conference last Thursday, President Bush said:

I have met with Prime Minister Sharon, and I have assured him every time we've met that he has no better friend than the United States of America.

I also stated the other day that if we ever get into the Mitchell process, where we can start discussing a political solution in the Middle East, that I believe there ought to be a Palestinian state, the boundaries of which will be negotiated by the parties so long as the Palestinian state recognizes the right of Israel to exist and will treat Israel with respect and will be peaceful on her borders….

So the President set out conditions for his support for a Palestinian state ? he would require a cessation of hostilities and negotiated borders. But why say that now? The inevitable signal is that post-World Trade Center/Pentagon, coalition politics are driving American foreign policy. Or, as Joseph Farah recently wrote,

The message is loud and clear: Keep up the violence, intensify it, keep raising the stakes, make the U.S. pay a price, and your demands will be met ? eventually.

Behind The Sharon Criticism

Saturday, November 10th, 2001

Although Prime Minister Sharon's “appeasement” analogy was not exactly apt ? President Bush is a proven friend of the Jewish State and is certainly no fainthearted Neville Chamberlain, nor is Israel a defenseless Czechoslovakia ? he did succeed in making an important point. There is no gainsaying that the task before us in seeking to uproot terrorism around the world does not lend itself to a quick solution. Indeed, everyone in the Administration, from Mr. Bush on down, continues to caution that we are in for a long haul.

So it could be well understood that the series of decisions by the Bush Administration to exclude Israel from the scenario ? Palestinian terrorists not targeted by the anti-terror plan; Secretary Powell declaring that Israel would not be part of any anti-terror coalition; and Secretary Rumsfeld's failure to stop in Israel on his current trip to the region to discuss the anti-terror campaign ? could have had ominous connotations for Mr. Sharon. Plainly, a sea change in U.S. policy for some time to come seemed to be in the offing and Israel was not to play a role in it. This was especially problematical in light of the fact that even after Israel agreed to meet with Arafat while the violence continued and Arafat simply reneged on what he had promised, the story of the U.S. planning to announce its acceptance of the creation of a Palestinian state was leaked and appeared as a stunning reward for Palestinian terror.

As late news reports suggest, hopefully, this issue has now been resolved ? not only for Israel's sake, but for the integrity and prospects for success of the anti-terror effort That is, there will, in fact, be no winking at terrorism and there will be no kowtowing to extortionate Arab conditions for their joining the coalition.

We would also suggest that those who would wish to create a breach between Israel and the Bush Administration should not look to the statements of the Israel Policy Forum or Americans for Peace Now. These groups were quick to applaud the prospect of U.S. recognition of a Palestinian state even in the midst of unceasing Palestinian violence. This is the same crowd that supported and provided cover for the disastrous Clinton policies. And, we might add, they and their ilk have precious little following among American Jews.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/editorial/behind-the-sharon-criticism/2001/11/10/

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