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April 17, 2014 / 17 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘CAMERA’

Anti-Jewish, Anti-Christian Amanpour to Host Prime Time Bible Special

Tuesday, December 4th, 2012

The CNN/ABC television journalist Christiane Amanpour has been the focus of numerous exposes for her repeated gratuitously nasty and false reporting on Israel and about religious Jews and Christians.

Back in August, 2007, Amanpour hosted a three part CNN series on “God’s Warriors.”  Each segment of the series focused on the “extremists” of a different one of each of the three major monotheistic religions: Jewish, Christian and Muslim.  Amanpour equated the Jewish and Christian fundamentalists with the fundamentalist Jihadi Muslims.  In the segment on “God’s Jewish Warriors,” Amanpour focused on the Jews living in Judea and Samaria, and those in the United States who financially support them.

Andrea Levin, the widely respected executive director of the Committee for Accuracy in Media for Middle East Reporting in America (CAMERA) described Amanpour’s reporting in that series as, “the most poisonously biased and factually shoddy feature to air on mainstream television in recent memory.”

Levin writes:

Throughout, Amanpour hammers the claim that Jewish settlements violate international law and she seeks to paint this position as a universally accepted view with a lopsided parade of like-minded commentators.

Yet apart from any judgement about the political advisability of building or not building settlements, many legal scholars argue these communities are, in fact, legal and do not violate Article 49 of the Fourth Geneva Convention as the detractors claim …  But not one scholar of this viewpoint is given voice in a two-hour feature largely devoted to decrying settlements and their residents.

Now ABC has chosen Amanpour to host a two part series called “Back to the Beginning.” In this series, ABC describes Amanpour as traveling to the land of the biblical stories from Genesis to Jesus.

Using the Old Testament as a guidebook, “Back to the Beginning” peels back the layers of history and faith that has inspired billions. Amanpour, the veteran war correspondent, wanted to investigate the roots of those stories that have created so much conflict, and at the same time so much of the healing she has seen across her career. It is an extraordinary journey through the deserts and cities of the ancient world, to the historical and pilgrimage sites associated with the epic tale that is the backbone of Judaism, Christianity and Islam today.

But perhaps Amanpour’s anti-Israel bias has abated.  It’s been more than five years since her last foray into an exclusively religious focus on the Middle East.  Not bloody likely, as her reporting from the Middle East about the recent Hamas-Israel conflict confirms.

Rather than the result of Hamas’s escalating rocket attacks on Israel – more than 130 in the 72 hours before Israel finally responded – Amanpour described the eight day military exchanges as caused by Israel ratcheting up the conflict.

Amanpour presented Israel’s Pillar of Defense as an offensive move, and the “first target was Ahmed El Jabari, a military chief of Hamas, the Islamic political party that governs the Gaza Strip which Israel and the West call a terrorist organization.”

Israel and the West recognize Hamas as a terrorist organization, while Amanpour’s description of Jabari made him sound like a noble Indian chieftain, rather than the mastermind of dozens of Israelis’ deaths, including small children, and of the kidnapping of Gilad Shalit whose release in exchange for more than 1000 Arab Palestinian prisoners catapulted Jibari to Hamas leadership.

In this upcoming series, Amanpour is going to be looking at the “historical and pilgrimage sites associated with the epic tale that is the backbone of Judaism, Christianity and Islam,” according to ABC’s press release.  The series is likely to be promoted as fact-based, but Amanpour’s history gives little comfort to those who fear it will be wildly dismissive of Jewish and Christian claims, and naively accepting of Muslim claims.

The ABC series “Back to the Beginnings” will air on Friday evenings, Dec 21 and Dec 28.

E-1 Contiguity Fallacy Returns

Sunday, December 2nd, 2012

With Israel’s announcement that it plans to proceed with construction in Area E-1, east of Jerusalem, earlier falsehoods about that land reemerge. Thus, Ha’aretz reports that construction in E-1

would effectively bisect the West Bank and sever the physical link between the Palestinian territories and Jerusalem.

Similarly, the New York Times reports:

Construction in E1, in West Bank territory that Israel captured in the 1967 war, would connect the large Jewish settlement of Maale Adumim to Jerusalem, dividing the West Bank in two. The Palestinian cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem would be cut off from the capital, making the contiguous Palestinian state endorsed by the United Nations last week virtually impossible.

So is it true that construction in E-1 would bisect the West Bank, and severing Palestinian contiguity, and cutting off Palestinian areas from Jerusalem? The answer is no. As CAMERA pointed out in 2005 (“The Contiguity Double Standard“):

Palestinian contiguity in the West Bank would be no more cut off with the so-called E-1 corridor than would Israeli contiguity if Israel were to withdraw to its pre-1967 borders, even with slight modifications.

Here’s why. First, take a look at this map of the region:

e1 continguity.jpg

As CAMERA earlier explained:

The black X marks the approximate location of the new neighborhood near Ma’aleh Adumim. To the west of the X is Jerusalem. The red line surrounding the X is the planned route of the security barrier, which will encircle Ma’aleh Adumim and Jerusalem.

Those who charge that Israeli building in Ma’aleh Adumim severs north-south contiguity disregard the fact that Palestinian-controlled areas would be connected by land east of Ma’aleh Adumim (marked on the map) that is at its narrowest point ~15 km wide.

Moreover, Israel proposes to build tunnels or overpasses to obviate the need for Palestinians to detour to the east through the corridor.

Ironically, many of those who argue for greater contiguity between Palestinian areas, at the same time promote Israeli withdrawal to its pre-1967 boundaries, which (even with minor modifications) would confine Israel to a far less contiguous territory than that of the West Bank. As shown on the map above, there is a roughly 15 km wide strip of land separating the Green Line (and the Security Fence) from the Mediterranean Sea (near Herzliya). Also shown is the circuitous route necessary to travel via this corridor between northern and southern Israel. (e.g. from Arad to Beit Shean.)

Nor is it true that the construction would cut off Palestinian areas from Jerusalem. Access to Jerusalem through Abu Dis, Eizariya, Hizma and Anata is not prevented by the proposed neighborhood, nor would it be precluded by a string of neighborhoods connecting Ma’aleh Adumim to Jerusalem.

Originally published at CAMERA.

Florida Loves Israel – A Student Conference in Tallahassee

Sunday, February 12th, 2012

It was no coincidence that the Florida Loves Israel conference – a conference of over 100 Florida university students and community members, and the first of its kind – fell in the month of February. Though cold and sometimes dreary, in the United States February comes with a special message from a special man in our history – Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. For me, his “I have a dream” speech not only speaks to my personal American patriotism, but reminds me of another man who spoke of dreams, another man whose beliefs and struggles speak passionately to my heart – Theodore Herzl. Herzl, in reference to the seeming impossibility of the creation of a Jewish state, once said “Im tirtzu, ein zo agada” – “If you will it, it is no dream.”

Florida State University began developing our dream of the Florida Loves Israel conference back in June after a meeting with the Miami Consulate and the Jewish Federations of Florida, when students realized that in a state the size of Florida, with over 15 major universities, it was a shame not to have the chance to express our love, our passion, and our dedication to the State of Israel. With no budget, no resources, and little guidance, students of Noles for Israel – FSU’s Israel advocacy group – and Hillel at FSU joined forced to fulfill a dream: to create a unified voice in support of Israel from one of her closest friends, the state of Florida.

Eight months and endless hours of planning later students arrived in Tallahassee, Florida ready to learn together, grow together, and remind one another that though they have strong opposition in their own communities, “if you will it, it is no dream.” These students are passionate, fearless, and love their homeland Israel.

Florida Loves Israel gave us the opportunity to openly discuss Israel both politically and culturally. Friday, we walked to Florida’s capitol to advocate for Israel. We asked our representatives to continue supporting Israel because her values are our values. We were met with overwhelming support. Breakout sessions included such topics as “Advanced Advocacy on Campus” by StandWithUS, “Combating Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions Movements” by the Zionist Organization of America, and community service opportunities in Israel from the Jewish National Fund. Our speakers discussed an array of topics as well. Mr. Yishai Fleisher spoke very passionately about “How to Achieve a Lasting Peace in the Middle East,” and Raanan Gissin, former Senior Adviser to Ariel Sharon, spoke with great insight about Israel’s existing threats. We were given the opportunity to experience some Israeli cultural exports as well. We were blessed with beautiful weather during our retreat to the FSU Reservation- a park with beautiful Florida mangroves, a sparkling lake, and sandy lake-side beaches. In Florida’s beautiful outdoors we learned Krav Maga, got acquainted with some IDF training moves, learned Israeli dancing, and built new, strategic relationships with other Floridians- an opportunity never provided before. The David Project, Hasbara Fellowships, CAMERA and the Jewish Federations of North America also provided fantastic workshops and sessions. For many of these organizations, this was the first time coming together. Regardless of political affiliation, whether left or right, center or unaffiliated, Florida Loves Israel brought together individuals of all kinds in support of one common goal and one common dream – Israel.

On sunday morning I had the opportunity to lead a discussion called “Israel at Heart: My Connection to Israel.” The purpose of this conversation was to provoke a range of diverse thoughts and feelings about Israel through storytelling. I shared thought-provoking pictures of Israel with the group: Jerusalem at dusk, soldiers at the Kotel, Yad Vashem, Israel painted within a human heart, and played Matisyahu’s “Jerusalem If I forget You.” Giving them each time to write their sentiments on paper, I had the opportunity to watch each of their expressions, each of their heartfelt emotions as they transcribed what Israel truly means to them. As the conversation proceeded, we shared intimidate details, intimate memories, and uniquely intimate experiences. One student saw snow for the first time in Jerusalem. Another found G-d at the Kotel. Another, for the first time, felt in her heart what it means to be a Jew and finally grasped what she had always longed for most of her life – to return home to Israel.

These students are inspiring, passionate, and bring both Dr. King and Herzl’s dreams to reality. One may start with little more than a dream, but with hard work, dedication and love anything can be achieved. This is the narrative of FLI, and this is the narrative of Israel.

I want each member of Noles for Israel and Hillel at FSU who worked diligently to know how unbelievably proud of you I am. I have watched each of you work incredibly hard toward a goal that many believed to be unattainable. You have proven them wrong. Your hard work, your dedication, and your unsurpassed passion is truly incredible, and I commend you for it.

CAMERA: Much Needed Media Watchdog

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

If you’ve read a letter to the editor correcting a false or misleading article about Israel in the newspaper, you might have seen CAMERA at work.

If you’ve attended a program featuring a panel of high-powered Middle East experts; or viewed a video detailing global attempts to delegitimize Israel; if your college student has turned to a more knowledgeable student on campus to counter anti-Israel bias there, you’ve undoubtedly come into the lens of CAMERA.

And if you live in the Chicago area and have seen CAMERA at work, you’ve seen Fern Baker at work — even if you didn’t know it.

Baker is the energetic Midwest regional director of CAMERA, the Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting. The 30-year-old national organization, with headquarters in Boston and regional offices in several other cities, monitors media of all types for biased or false reporting about Israel and seeks to educate the public about Middle East issues.

Baker explains the mission in a few succinct sentences. “We have a thread,” she says. “We deal in media, in journalism that is false or omits important facts – anything that has bias against Israel and the Middle East. We try to enlighten people.”

Actually CAMERA does much more on its way to promoting such enlightenment. On a given day, Baker, who has been on the job for 14 months, might be on the phone to Jerusalem to entice an expert to come to Chicago to speak, or planning an event in tandem with another Jewish organization, or working with a local university in hopes of placing a CAMERA “fellow” on campus – or, of course, raising funds for the organization’s work to continue.

 

For Baker, the job is new but the passion for Israel isn’t.

Originally from Montreal, she earned an undergraduate degree in Jewish studies and a graduate degree in Jewish education from McGill University. She also studied theater, worked for a while in Toronto, then came to Chicago to work in that business. Soon she was finding success as a professional model and appearing in commercials – “running around the country doing shoots,” as she describes it.

“I learned my best salesmanship and performance skills in the business,” she says, skills she draws on in her work with CAMERA. Eventually she went into fashion and opened her own small business. (She’s currently studying for a master’s degree in professional Jewish Studies at Spertus Institute.)

At the same time, she kept up the involvement in the Jewish world that she had begun in Canada – where, she says, more than 70 percent of the country’s Jews have visited Israel, a figure that puts the American Jewish community to shame.

She’s a longtime member of Anshe Emet Synagogue in Chicago, where her children attended day school (Baker has been married for 26 years – her husband is a general contractor – and has two sons, one in college and one who has recently graduated). She became friendly with Anshe Emet’s Rabbi Michael Siegel, a tireless booster and defender of Israel. She was involved with the Hartman Institute, a Jerusalem-based research and education institute, and served as a volunteer with AIPAC and the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago and eventually with CAMERA.

“I was pretty caught up in their conferences, the level of their speakers,” Baker says during a recent interview, where she arrives not only flawlessly and stylishly dressed and coiffed, but armed with some of the plentiful material – books, pamphlets, videos – that the organization puts out. “That was of particular interest to me – they brought in stars. If you look at other organizations, there aren’t too many any more that bring in really cutting-edge speakers, and the funding is part of it,” she says.

For CAMERA, she says, bringing in high-level speakers is not meant to raise money but rather to educate the public.

When the position at CAMERA, where Baker was a member, became available, “I jumped at the opportunity to apply for the job,” she says. “Many people knew of my passion for Israel and my desire to get involved, to connect. They jumped on the horn and I was hired.”

Among the strengths she brings to the position, she says: “I cross a lot of different areas. I’m a good networker and I know a lot of people. I cross over many places, I know a lot of clergy in the city and have good relationships with them, and that helps.”

After getting the job, “I rolled my sleeves up,” she says. “I have really tried this past year to do an enormous amount of events and programming – sometimes three or four a month. It’s about getting the word out there, making it an interesting social and educational experience, crossing streams. I would bring (Israeli radio and TV broadcaster) Yishai Fleisher into a Reform synagogue, trying to open up doors.”

Israeli Filmmaker Defames Israel And Holocaust Remembrance

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011

Israel’s opponents increasingly contrive to hijack commemoration of the Holocaust in order to malign the Jewish state. Recently, a battle erupted at Northeastern University in Boston over the decision to invite Israeli filmmaker Yoav Shamir to screen “Defamation” at its annual Holocaust Awareness Week in March.

The film, far from commemorating the six million Jews who perished, sends the opposite message – that Jews and Israelis exploit the Holocaust to justify the brutalization of Palestinians. Shamir joins the increasing numbers of Israeli filmmakers who win accolades from their international peers for disparaging their country and people.

Shamir claims he made the film to learn why three words – anti-Semitism, Holocaust and Nazis – “always seem to be in the air.” It quickly becomes apparent, however, that he has already made up his mind that the problem lies with the Jews themselves.

Depicting the Anti-Defamation League as an organization that expends its resources on trivial examples of discrimination, he decides there are no real cases of anti-Semitism to be found. He ignores the vast evidence of anti-Semitism in the Arab-Islamic world where Jews are depicted as Nazis in the media, mosques and public discourse and children are encouraged to destroy the Jewish state and its people. Advertisement

Had he wanted, Shamir could point to horrific cases of anti-Semitism. For example, the Muslim murderer of a French Jew in 2006 who explained: “I have killed my Jew, now I can go to heaven.”

Instead, Shamir contends that contemporary anti-Semitism is just a myth that propels Israel’s own aggression against Palestinians. The purpose of Israeli-sponsored educational trips to Holocaust death camps in Poland, he suggests, is to educate Israeli youth to brutalize Palestinians.

Shamir prods Israeli youngsters on such a trip for emotional responses to what they’ve witnessed. One girl says, “I want to kill the people who did this.” Shamir pushes her further to state that the Nazis have “heirs” and Shamir supplies his own conclusion, “The Germans started it and we are perpetuating it. We perpetuate this death industry. We perpetuate death and that is why we can never be a normal people.”

Shamir bolsters his thesis by showcasing Norman Finkelstein, who has made a career of denigrating Israel and accusing Jews of exploiting the Holocaust for material benefit.

Finkelstein charges: “The Nazi Holocaust has become the main ideological weapon for launching wars of aggression. It’s the suffering [of the Jews] that is used as another pretext or excuse to humiliate, degrade and torture the Palestinians…suffering which is then wrapped in a club and the club is used to crush the skulls of the Palestinians.”

Such lurid allegations are false; Israel justifies military operations and security measures as a response to terrorist activity that has cost thousands of lives and continues to threaten Israel. Shamir, however, compares Finkelstein to “biblical prophets of doom always being pelted with stones for saying things nobody wanted to hear.”

Other fringe viewpoints are heard as well. Uri Avnery, a far-left activist, insists, “The phenomenon of anti-Semitism exists only in the media and in the minds of the Jewish world.”

While anti-Arabs, anti-Muslims and anti-blacks are “plentiful in America,” according to Avnery, “you need a magnifying glass” to find anti-Semites. In fact, contrary to Avnery’s thesis, FBI statistics document hate crimes against Jews outnumbering those against Muslims and Arabs by nine to one.

Professor John Mearsheimer, coauthor of a controversial and widely discredited book suggesting that pro-Israel advocates control American foreign policy to the country’s detriment, presents his familiar rhetoric – that there are critics of Israel, but no evidence of anti-Semitism.

Shamir then provides his theory about why the Holocaust promotes Israeli abuse of Arabs: “It occurred to me after seeing the almost incomprehensible horrors my people have suffered, other people’s suffering might seem less significant. When we see an Arab home being demolished we say that its not too bad, we have seen worse.”

He ignores the myriad commissions set up by the Israeli government to investigate claims of wrongdoing during military operations, a sharp contrast to Israel’s enemies who publicly celebrate acts of savagery against Jews. Failing to grapple with Israel’s legitimate security needs, he instead proclaims that it is the Jewish people’s obsession with the Holocaust that fuels aggression and “prevents us from ever becoming normal people,” and concludes that it is time to stop focusing on the Holocaust.

Just The Facts, Ma’am

Wednesday, June 16th, 2010
The trusty folks at CAMERA have assembled a handy guide to the falsehoods and facts surrounding the Gaza flotilla. Some salient excerpts:
Falsehood: The purpose of the anti-Israel activists’ trip to Gaza was to deliver essential humanitarian aid to Palestinians.
Fact: Organizers of the trip have themselves made clear this isn’t true. “This mission is not about delivering humanitarian supplies,” saidorganizer and anti-Israel activist Greta Berlin. Instead, she explained, it is about ending Israel’s blockade in order to allow unfettered shipments to the Hamas-ruled territory.
At any rate, Israel delivers more goods to Gaza in one week (roughly 15,000 tons) than the flotilla organizers claimed to be bringing (10,000 tons). And according to the Financial Times, “shops all over Gaza are bursting with goods” thanks to the active smuggling tunnels leading into the territory from Egypt.
Falsehood: This was a flotilla of “peace activists.”
Fact: The most prominent organizers of the flotilla have strongly backed violence. And even if some passengers thought they were involved in a peace mission, video evidence clearly shows passengers on the Mavi Marmara planning, and engaging in, brutal violence.
The two main organizers of the voyage were the Turkish Insani Yardim Vakfi (IHH), which has worked closely with terrorist organizations, and the Free Gaza Movement, which is strongly linked to the extremist International Solidarity Movement (ISM).
Falsehood: Naval blockades are not permitted under international law.
Fact: Naval blockades are legal. They have long been part of customary and even conventional international law, and the relevant legal doctrines were reviewed and codified in the 1994 San Remo Manual on International Law Applicable to Armed Conflicts at Sea.
Falsehood: It is not permissible to stop a merchant ship, as opposed to an army ship.
Fact: According to the San Remo Manual, merchant ships violating a blockade may be stopped, or even attacked. Article 98 states: “Merchant vessels believed on reasonable grounds to be breaching a blockade may be captured. Merchant vessels which, after prior warning, clearly resist capture may be attacked.”
Falsehood: Israel violated international law when it stopped the ships in international waters.
Fact: Legal experts cited by Reuters notethat “Under the law of a blockade, intercepting a vessel could apply globally so long as a ship is bound for a ‘belligerent’ territory.”
Falsehood: Israel prevents essential humanitarian items such as baby formula from entering the Gaza Strip.
Fact: Israel facilitates the transfer of thousandsof tonsof humanitarian items per week into Gaza, including baby formula.
Falsehood: Israeli soldiers descended on the ship from helicopters and immediately attacked with machine guns innocent passengers sleeping on the deck.
Fact: Video footageclearly demonstrates that this is a lie. The footage, shot from different angles, shows Israeli soldiers landing on the ship being immediately and violently assaulted by gangs of passengers awaiting them on deck. The attack on the Israeli soldiers began, as retired British Marine Officer Peter Cook acknowledgedon British television, while the first Israeli soldier still had both of his hands on the rope being used to lower him onto the ship.
            Cook also said the large Israeli weapon seen in video footage appeared to be a paintball gun, which corresponds with Israel’s assertion that these were the primary weapons soldiers brought onto the ship.
Falsehood: Passengers on the Mavi Marmara were engaged in “peaceful resistance,” had no weapons, and did not violently attack Israeli soldiers.
Fact: Video footage shows, among other acts of violence, a passenger stabbingan Israeli soldier, gangs of passengers pummeling soldiers with metal rods and other objects, and a soldier being thrown off a high deck.

Testimony from both Israelisoldiersand activist passengersdescribes pistols being taken from injured soldiers. The ship’s captain reportedly told Israeli soldiers that the violent passengers threw their guns overboard before the ship was completely taken over.

 

Jason Maoz can be reached at jmaoz@jewishpress.com

That Bogus Yaalon Quote

Wednesday, February 11th, 2009

It took The New York Times long enough to issue a correction concerning Rashid Khalidi’s Jan. 8 op-ed column. Those of you who read the Monitor’s Jan. 16 column (“What Did Moshe Yaalon Really Say?”) will recall that Khalidi, the Columbia University professor of Arab studies and Barack Obama’s longtime friend, acquaintance or friendly acquaintance (depending on whom you asked and when) cited an incendiary statement allegedly made in 2002 by former IDF chief of staff Moshe Yaalon:

“The Palestinians must be made to understand in the deepest recesses of their consciousness that they are a defeated people.”

As the Monitor remarked at the time, that’s pretty strong imagery, bringing to mind an Israeli boot planted firmly on the neck of a prostrate Palestinian.

But a simple Google search revealed the quote, which had been circulating on the Internet for quite some time and had been cited ad nauseam by Arab news services, anti-Israel writers such as Khalidi’s friend Henry Siegman, and by Khalidi himself, was not just inaccurate but in fact it turned upside down the meaning of what Yaalon had really said in an August 2002 interview in with Haaretz.

The Monitor’s alter ego wrote about the bogus quote on Commentary magazine’s “Contentions” blog the day after Khalidi’s piece appeared. The media watchdog group CAMERA was already on the case, having submitted a request to the Times for a correction. But it took the Times three whole weeks to ascertain what the Monitor and CAMERA knew the day Khalidi’s piece appeared.

And consider the curious wording of the Times’s correction, which was labeled an “editor’s note”:

An Op-Ed article on Jan. 8, on misperceptions of Gaza, included an unverified quotation. A former Israeli Defense Forces chief of staff, Moshe Yaalon, was quoted as saying in 2002 that ”the Palestinians must be made to understand in the deepest recesses of their consciousness that they are a defeated people.” This quotation, while cited widely, does not appear in the Israeli newspaper interview to which it is usually attributed. Its original source has not been found, and thus it should not have appeared in the article.

Not only did the editor’s note fail to mention Khalidi by name (wouldn’t want to embarrass the good professor, would we?) but as Werner Cohn described it on his “I Beg To Disagree” blog, the note “is completely disingenuous from beginning to end. It says that an ‘original source has not been found’ when, in fact, there is a publicly available original source for General Moshe Yaalon’s views, and these views are the very opposite of what Khalidi and The New York Times claimed them to be.”

As for as the discrepancy between Yaalon’s actual words and the quote falsely attributed to him, Michael van der Gallen wrote at the blog “PoliGazette”:

It’s not even almost the same. In the fake quote Yaalon says Palestinians have to be shown they are a “defeated” people, whereas in the original quote he merely says Palestinians have to be made to understand that their terrorism won’t destroy Israel. Khalidi is an intellectual. He’s also working for one of the most respected elite universities in America. There’s no excuse for his use of a fake quote; he should have known the quote is fake, and my educated guess is that he does know it.So why use it nonetheless? Because, one could conclude, Khalidi isn’t very concerned with objective scientific/scholarly research. Instead, his major concern is to spread pro-Palestine propaganda throughout the world. As Hitler’s master of propaganda Joseph Goebbels once said (paraphrasing here), people will believe every lie if you repeat it often enough.

Finally, CAMERA noted some of the many instances the fake quote has been used to defame Israel:

Columnist H.D.S. Greenway used it in the Boston Globe (March 7, 2006); University of San Diego professor Gary Fields fooled the Chicago Tribune and its readers with it (Feb. 22, 2004); the Toronto Star’s editorial page editor emeritus, Haroon Siddiqui, cited it in his obituary for Yasir Arafat to paint a picture of Israeli perfidy (Nov. 14, 2004); Henry Siegman relied on it for a piece in the London Review of Books … and Electronic Intifada co-founder Ali Abunimah regurgitated the quote on his publication (March 7, 2008).Electronic Intifada, Counterpunch, and other radical Web sites that propagated the hoax are not likely to correct. More important, though, is whether the Globe, Tribune, Star and others will follow the example set by The New York Times and clear the record.

Jason Maoz can be contacted at jmaoz@jewishpress.com

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