web analytics
December 27, 2014 / 5 Tevet, 5775
 
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Camp David Accords’

Despite Egyptian Military Buildup, Israel Will Adhere To Accords

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Despite the deteriorating security situation along the Egyptian-Israeli border, Israeli Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman has rejected Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi’s request to reconsider the terms of the 1979 Camp David Accords. Morsi wants a substantial increase in the number of Egyptian tanks and armored divisions to patrol what has seemingly become the lawless Sinai Peninsula.

“It is important for the Egyptians to get a handle on their security troubles, but there isn’t a chance that Israel will change the [Camp David] military protocols. The Egyptians should not delude themselves by repeatedly insisting on this request,” Lieberman told Kol Yisrael Radio.

News outlets in Israel and the U.S. have reported that Morsi intends to press White House officials to renegotiate aspects of the Camp David Accords during this week’s UN General Assembly meetings in New York. Morsi also reportedly sought a face-to-face meeting with President Obama during his U.S. trip, but was rebuffed after Obama allegedly upbraided Morsi less than two weeks ago in a tense phone conversation. The exchange took place following the violent attacks by protestors on the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.

The Camp David Accords stipulate that, “no more than one division [mechanized or infantry] of Egyptian armed forces will be stationed within an area lying approximately 30 kilometers east of the Gulf of Suez and the Suez Canal.” After terrorists murdered 15 Egyptian border policemen in August during an intended attack on Israeli forces and civilians, the Egyptian High Command ordered several armored and infantry divisions into Sinai to hunt down the terrorist cells operating in Sinai.

While Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak gave tacit approval to the Egyptian move, IDF Chief of Staff Benny Gantz has informed Barak and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that the Egyptians seem to be in no rush to weed out the terrorist cells and instead are continuing to upgrade their forces in the region – a clear violation of the Camp David Accords.

A senior member of the Egyptian parliament warned the IDF against pursuing terrorist cells within Egyptian territory in the event of another cross-border incident. But General Tal Russo, commander of the IDF Southern Command, told the Israeli media that the army will bolster its forces along the border and respond to any terrorist incursion. The IDF recently added armed reconnaissance UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) – which can fire into Egyptian territory from inside Israel – as well as mechanized border patrols and at least one elite infantry division to the region.

Several Arab and European newspapers have reported that several jihadist cells operating in Sinai are comprised of Hamas soldiers who were trained in Gaza by operatives of the al-Quds Brigades. The force is Iran’s so-called foreign legion, as it is greatly influenced by the Revolutionary Guards.

Israeli political commentators have expressed the view that while Morsi is determined to show his Muslim Brotherhood allies that he is willing to challenge strategic aspects of the Camp David Accords, he must also confront radical Islamic terror organizations in Sinai (one columnist wrote that Sinai has turned into “a latter- day Wild West).”

The Sinai terror attacks have greatly impaired Egypt’s tourist industry in el-Arish and Sharm el-Sheikh, major sources of revenue for the country’s economy. The Sinai’s increasingly dangerous atmosphere has prompted Israel’s security services to recommend the closing of the Eilat-Taba border crossing to Israelis and foreigners wishing to enter the Sinai coastline. While the crossing remains open for now, Israeli border guards are discouraging their countrymen from entering the region.

Morsi, Obama, the Best Thing that Ever Happened to Israel

Monday, August 13th, 2012

The short history of the state of Israel is paved with mistakes, some of them understandable, some difficult to comprehend. But, in my opinion, no mistake even comes close to the signing of the Camp David Accords.

Two inherently evil principles were coined in that accord and have become part of the foundation of our view of ourselves as Israeli Jews in relation to our Arab neighbors.

The first evil principle was the exchange of territories for peace.

It established that in exchange for the Arabs recognizing the Jews’ right to live, Israel will return territories which she captured after those same Arabs had attacked her and tried to destroy her.

It is inherently immoral.

Let’s say that you and I have a dispute over some land which you claim I attained unjustly and it belongs to you. Normally, you and I would seek an arbiter, and both of us would provide proof supporting our positions. Then, the arbiter would decide and we, presumably, would respect their decision.

But Camp David established that when it comes to Israel and its Arab neighbors, we do not discuss the legitimacy of the claims on the land. Instead, the Arabs will agree to let us live and we will hand over the disputed land.

This repugnant principle was not invented by the Left. It was conceived and embraced by the late Prime Minister Menachem Begin, who exchanged our right to our God-given land for a Nobel prize and 40 years of a cold peace with Egypt (Of course, Israel enjoyed 40 years of a cold war—which is about the same—with Syria, without paying for it with any land.).

The second vile component of the Camp David Accords was the recognition that, eventually, at some later date, the Palestinians, too, should benefit from the same principle of land for peace. Nothing specific was determined, but the time to pay that piper arrived eventually, with staggering losses to Israel and its citizens.

Still, those two anti-Israeli and anti-Jewish ideas, which have since become the cornerstones of Israeli foreign and military policy, were not the worst outcome of Camp David.

Israel’s own ambivalence about its own identity can also be traced to that same terrible document.

The accords blocked any future Israeli government’s attempt to annex the disputed territories of Judea, Samaria and Gaza. What worked perfectly and resulted in a great deal more positive than negative outcomes in East Jerusalem and the Golan Heights, which have become undisputed parts of the state, could no longer be done for the rest of the land. Instead of straight-forward development, for the benefit of Jews and Arabs alike, the territories became a place of clandestine activities.

Settlements, the very core of Zionist lore, became the symbol of waste and immorality. The shadow war we are witnessing these days, between Peace Now and B’Tzelem operatives and the settlers, are only the latest in a twisted and ugly plot born by Israel’s inability to make itself whole.

The dominion of leftist civil servants over policy decisions—in a right-wing majority government—is another aspect of the same ambivalence.

The repeated entanglements between the IDF and Arab demonstrators is yet another fruit of the same poison tree. If Israeli law ruled the territories, you would send policemen, not IDF recruits, to control demonstrations. Indeed, there’s no telling how much damage has been done to the army’s readiness because it is being used as a police force.

Our big hope is that Morsi, the Muslim Brothers president of Egypt, will kill the Camp David Accords, de facto or, better yet, de jure. While not changing much in terms of an Egyptian threat against Israel – at this point not a viable one – killing Camp David could mean a reversal of Israel’s obligation regarding the territories.

Add to that an Obama victory in November, and, presumably, intensified U.S. pressure on Israel for suicidal concessions to the Palestinians, and there could be a cumulative effect, mostly on Israel’s public opinion.

With the delusion of peace with the Arabs out of the way, it may just be possible that the Israeli mainstream would reject the failed messiahs of the past four decades and embrace the notion that only a militarily, morally and spiritually strong Israel can sustain itself in this mad region.

Former Mossad Chief: Turkey Would Remain Neutral in Israel-Iran Confrontation

Monday, February 6th, 2012

Former Mossad Chief Efraim Halevy, in an interview with Russia TV, estimated that “Turkey would take a neutral position” in the event of a military confrontation between Israel and Iran.

Halevy, who served as Mossad’s chief from 1998-2002, also discussed Israel’s isolation in the post-”Arab Spring” Middle East, and claimed that Israel was in a far safer, integrated position than it was before it signed the Camp David Accords with Egypt in 1978.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/former-mossad-chief-turkey-would-remain-neutral-in-israel-iran-confrontation/2012/02/06/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: