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April 17, 2014 / 17 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘campus’

To Protect Jewish Students, California University Committee Recommends Ban on Hate Speech

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012

Each year at many California universities, pro-Israel students dread the inevitable arrival of “The Wall,”—the centerpiece of Israel Apartheid Week. These programs, sometimes known as Justice in Palestine Week or Palestinian Awareness Week, usually take place sometime between late-winter and spring and focus on charges that Israel is an Apartheid state that illegally occupies Palestinian territories.

But what if the wall wasn’t allowed to go up?

Speculation on the future of anti-Israel demonstrations on University of California (UC) campuses has increased in recent weeks after a mid-July report compiled by the UC President’s Advisory Council on Campus Climate recommended that UC consider banning all hate speech from its nine campuses.

Between October 2011 and May 2012, a group of professionals handpicked by UC President Mark Yudof travelled to six UC campuses (Santa Cruz, Davis, Irvine, Berkeley, Los Angeles, and San Diego) to assess the social conditions of Jewish students as well as Arab and Muslim students.

Jewish student leaders on the campuses were interviewed by the council, which evaluated the students’ biggest concerns as Jews on campus.

A separate report, providing background and recommendations on behalf of Arab and Muslim students was also released in mid-July.

Ultimately, the council recommended that hate speech, particularly anti-Israel demonstrations, be banned because of the unsafe and uncomfortable environment that can ensue on campus.

“UC does not have a hate-free policy that allows the campus to prevent well-known bigoted and hate organizations from speaking on campus such as the KKK,” the council wrote in the report. “UC should push its current harassment and nondiscrimination provisions further, clearly define hate speech in its guidelines, and seek opportunities to prohibit hate speech on campus.”

The council recognized that such a ban, if put in place, almost certainly would lead to legal action challenging it. Already, a petition asking Yudof to table the recommendations has gathered over 2,300 signatures.

Opponents of the recommendation claim that the report, released July 9, does not consider all viewpoints of Jewish students on campuses—particularly those of Jews who are critical of Israel.

In response, StandWithUs started a counter-petition urging the UC Office of the President (UCOP) to accept and implement the recommendations outlined in the report. While the first petition targets the hate speech ban proposal, the StandWithUs petition focuses on implementation of the entire report’s recommendations which include ensuring that kosher food options be available on UC campuses and that anti-Semitism be clearly defined and banned.

The advisory council also recommended that UC staff members receive cultural competency training and that accurate data be kept on Jewish students to better evaluate their needs.

There has been mixed reaction to the report in the pro-Israel community. Sharona Asraf, a StandWithUs Emerson Fellow and board member of Tritons for Israel at UC San Diego, created a Facebook event promoting the petition and said she supports the Council’s recommendation to ban hate speech.

“This will verbalize protocol and will elaborate what the consequences are for hate speech,” Asraf said.

However, Daniel Narvy, President of Movement for Peace in the Middle East at UC Irvine, said that while he thinks hate speech should not exist, banning it on UC campuses could actually make life more difficult for pro-Israel students.

“I can promise that SJP will claim the university is Islamaphobic and complain until they get their way,” Narvy said. “Do I think the hate speech, which it clearly is, should be there? No, but the university cannot use prior restraint and just censor a club just because [some members of the club] are obnoxious .” Richard Barton, who is the national education chair for the Anti-Defamation League, co-wrote the report with Alice Huffman, president of the California NAACP. Barton defended the report in an Aug. 23 op-ed in the San Francisco Gate.

“By including an examination of the climate for Jewish students, the Campus Climate Council has truly advanced the notion of honest and critical examination that lie at the heart of the UC’s core values,” Barton wrote.

Though UCOP is not expected to finish evaluating both the Jewish and the Arab and Muslim reports until late October, Yudof noted that ensuring a right to free speech would remain a priority.

“The Council will continue to address issues for a broad range of campus community members,” Yudof said in an August 8 open letter to the UC system. “None of this is designed to stifle free speech, but rather to ensure that our campuses are welcoming to a broad diversity of students, faculty and staff.”

New Kids on Campus: Young Jewish Conservatives Are Staking Out Ground

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012

Last weekend a core group of conservatives got together to learn, strategize and drum up the vote for their political candidate in the swing state of Pennsylvania.  But two characteristics of this group stick out – they are Jewish!  And they are young!

The twenty-somethings were holed up in a hotel outside Philadelphia, spending a traditional Shabbat – new for some of them – and talking about conservative politics – not new for any of them.  The attendees were all members of the appropriately-named Young Jewish Conservatives (YJC), who have come together to promote conservative causes in the United States, infused with Jewish values and in defense of Israel.

YJC was conceived of by two American, Jewishly observant Zionists who deal with college-age Jews: Ben Packer and Yitzchok Tendler.  Packer was a rabbi with Jewish Experience Movement of the South on the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill campus, and at Duke University.  Tendler worked with Jerusalem Fellowships, taking Jewish college students to Israel.  Both recognized something was missing on the campuses: there was nothing available for Jewish students who are politically conservative.

As Packer told The Jewish Press, “we noticed three things: one, politically conservative Jewish students on campus were being treated like outcasts, even within the traditional Jewish campus organizations; two, the trend in the Democratic party was going against Israel, with President Obama being an extreme example; and three, politically conservative college students have the values that are closest to Jewish values.”  The two decided to join forces and create an organization to fill the obvious need.

The first organized effort by YJC was the Yameena Fellowship trip to Israel over last winter break.  There was a second Yameena Fellowship trip this summer.  There were about 30 participants on each trip.  As Packer explained, “when we say young Jewish conservatives, not all of our members are equally, or even especially, conservative on all issues, and religiously they come from across the spectrum, but the single thread that pulls us all together is the pro-Israel focus, that is what solidifies the group.”

A rising star in the YJC is David Milstein.  A Dickinson College senior who hails from Virginia, Milstein learned about YJC when he saw an ad for a free trip to Israel for politically conservative American Jews.  The last time Milstein was in Israel was when Milstein was 13, and he was eager to go back.  He was especially excited about the idea of having a trip geared to someone with his interests, rather than the typical Birthright trip which doesn’t venture into Judea and Samaria, and which is frequently centrist to liberal, politically.

Milstein could barely contain himself as he described to The Jewish Press the YJC Israel trips.  “We went to the border towns, we went all the way up in the Golan, we had briefings in the Knesset, and we were treated to lessons on diplomacy and Israeli history by members of the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs.”  One of the highlights was a special meeting between the YJC members and former Soviet refusenik and current head of the Jewish Agency for Israel, Natan Sharansky.

According to Milstein, everyone who has gone on the YJC Israel trips was already interested and maybe already somewhat active.  “But what they leave the trip with is the clear confidence to go back to the campuses and advocate – really stand up for – Israel.”  Milstein finishes: “There’s a real transformation.”

Milstein went on both YJC Israel trips.  The first time, last winter, he went as a regular participant.  This summer, after he was elected student president of the organization, Milstein went as a staff member.

Barely a year into its existence, YJC already boasts members from colleges across the country, including American University, UCLA, Hofstra University, Wellesley College, Brandeis University, Rutgers University, Harvard University, Pittsburgh University, Temple University and more than a dozen others.

In addition to the trips to Israel and this month’s shabbaton in the Philadelphia suburbs, YJC members also participated in two political conventions in Washington, D.C. over the past year.  The first was at the Conservative Political Action Committee which took place in February, the second was at the Faith and Freedom Conference which took place in June.

Dovi Meles is from Philadelphia and he was back this summer.  In the past he has been informally involved with the Republican Jewish Coalition, and was asked by that leadership to help put together a shabbaton for YJC members who might stay and work with the RJC on their swing state focus in Pennsylvania this week.

“They wanted to have interesting content and since I’m from the area I knew who might be available,” Meles said.

The programming Meles put together was heavy both on political content and on Jewish observance and networking.   One presentation was made by a former high-level Pentagon official talking about Iran, another was by Susan Kone, a Dartmouth College and University of Pennsylvania Law School grad who ran against Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) for US Congress.  The YJC members heard from a tea party strategist, a Zionist organization founder and leader, and a Jewish social media guru.

The goal of YJC, according to Packer, “is to make Jewish politically conservative students: better conservatives, better Jews and better pro-Israel activists.”

While David Milstein was already a committed conservative, he grew up in a Reform home and was not especially engaged with Jewish practices.  Due to his involvement with YJC, “where all official events incorporate Jewish traditions such as Shabbat observance and kosher meals,” Milstein told The Jewish Press,” I now try to observe Shabbat regularly, whether or not I am with the YJC, and I certainly will attend synagogue services for the high holidays.”  “This experience,” he says, “is having an impact on my understanding of the importance of my faith.”

Michigan St. Jewish Student, Police Differ on Whether Attack Was Hate Crime

Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

A Jewish student at Michigan State University said he was attacked at an off-campus party in what he is calling a hate crime.

But the East Lansing Police Department said Tuesday that a preliminary investigation has determined that the incident two days earlier likely was not a hate crime, The State News reported. The police reportedly spoke with two witnesses and have identified a potential suspect who does not live in the area.

Zach Tennen, 19, said that just before Sunday’s assault, his attackers asked him if he was Jewish and that he answered in the affirmative, according to reports. Tennen, a resident of suburban Detroit and a sophomore at the university, told WDIV-TV in Detroit that his attackers also “were making Nazi and Hitler symbols and they said they were part of the KKK.”

Tennen, whose jaw was broken in the attack near MSU’s East Lansing campus, was knocked unconscious. The assailants stapled his mouth shut through his gums.

Others at the party watched as Tennen called a taxi to take him to the hospital. His mouth was surgically wired shut.

His family has called the Anti-Defamation League regarding the assault. Tennen plans to return to classes in a week.

The university in an email statement referred all questions about the police investigation to East Lansing Police, as the incident occurred off campus.

“Michigan State University’s Student Affairs and Services office has reached out to the family of the student who said he was assaulted in East Lansing to provide the academic and other support the student needs,” the statement also said.

School Resumes, Pro-Israel Advocates Get Busy

Monday, August 27th, 2012

Visit http://israelcampusbeat.org for the latest Israel trends and events on campus.

As students prepare for the new academic year, the campus Israel community is stocking up with new ideas for attracting participants, as well as using some tried-and-true approaches from past years. Israel advocates face the challenge of creating techniques that focus on retaining old students and recruiting new ones who have yet to become active on campus.

Many pro-Israel groups see the first month of school as a crucial period—a small window of time in which they must draw students to their cause. They focus much of their efforts on students who have demonstrated interest by visiting Israel recently.

At the University of Texas at Austin, Tracy Frydberg, a sophomore who serves as vice president of Texans for Israel (TFI), said, “At the beginning of the school year, TFI will contact any student who went on Birthright or other trips to Israel, talk to them about their experience and find ways for them to stay involved.”

At Penn State, sophomore vice president of Penn State Israel Alliance (PSIA) , Melissa Saks, said, “It is critical to branch out to those students who have visited Israel over the summer, especially at the beginning of the semester, because they are still on that ‘Israel high’ and really feel compelled to be involved with helping Israel.”

However, not all students have been to Israel and advocates must find ways to make Zionism and the Jewish state appealing to them.

Some activists plan to work with like-minded campus groups that can help them reach large new audiences. At the University of Nevada at Reno, junior Elliot Malin described an environment in which he and other pro-Israel students seek “to reach out to a larger group this year by doing more events with Christians United for Israel (CUFI).

“Since our Jewish population is so small,” Malin said, “we figured if we can engage with another energized group we can be more successful. We want to diversify the leadership to get those who aren’t as involved more involved.”

Reaching out to students in the 21st century involves a mix of traditional and innovative approaches. Many campus Israel groups use social media such as Facebook and Twitter to highlight their activities. PSIA has embraced another technology — television — to spread their message. They have crossed into relatively new territory by appearing on their University’s news channel. With approximately 40,000 undergraduate students on Penn State’s campus, the university channel provides an easy and effective way to reach a broad segment of the student population.

Advocates at schools without a university news channel can still reach a large and diverse student body during the activities fair; a day early in the semester when every club on campus is allowed to set up shop at a table and display materials, pamphlets and other unique club attributes to campus.

Nonetheless, sometimes the most effective pitch for advocates to give is a simple, face-to-face discussion.

“I hope to sit down over coffee with as many people that I can and find them specific roles and jobs within TFI to keep them excited and engaged for the rest of the school year,” said UT’s Frydberg.

Visit http://israelcampusbeat.org for the latest Israel trends and events on campus.

Israel’s Study Abroad Opportunities Expand

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Visit http://israelcampusbeat.org for the latest Israel trends and events on campus.

During the 1970s and 1980s — and even before then — most North American students who came to Israel on a study abroad program were looking for a connection to their heritage. The majority of the students participating in these programs were Jewish, or looking for a Jewish connection. As a result, most of the university programs were designed to fulfill this need.

These study abroad programs offered courses primarily related to Israeli history and culture, Jewish history, culture and identity, and the study of Hebrew. The programs offered by the Rothberg School at the Hebrew University and by Tel Aviv University fit this classic description of Study Abroad in Israel.

At that time, the University of Haifa International School was one of the few programs that offered an alternative. It attracted non-Jewish students, as well as Jewish students who were looking for something other than a “Jewish experience” in Israel.

Today’s Millennial students (Generation Y) are a more discerning group. Their reasons for coming to study in Israel and the goals they are trying to achieve are quite different from those students in previous years.

Today’s student is more demanding as to the type of experience he or she expects and what their requirements are to make that happen. The student coming to Israel today is looking for more than a connection to his or her heritage; often, the student is not Jewish, and even among the Jews who come, many do not identify as practicing Jews. Today, students come to study in Israel for many reasons, including professional advancement, academic requirements, personal growth, international experience, an alternative to the classroom and, of course, in some cases, a connection to their Jewish heritage.

In order to accommodate the new student, innovative programs have sprung up, in addition to the classic Israeli study abroad programs. Today’s offerings include full degree programs in engineering, academic-based volunteer programs, internships, work-study programs, religious learning, secular yeshivas, professional training programs and many more options.

Israel’s universities have responded to this trend by modifying their academic offerings to meet today’s demand. The five major universities – the Hebrew University, Tel Aviv University, Ben-Gurion University, the Technion, and University of Haifa – now offer courses in engineering, creative arts, business and entrepreneurship and academic honors programs.

Students have opportunities to participate in experiential learning internships and to receive professional mentoring. By widening the offerings and establishing an environment of acceptance of all student types, the university study abroad programs in Israel seek to remain relevant and challenging amidst the wealth of alternative programs being offered today around the world.

Of course, the traditional offerings of Jewish and Israeli history and culture subjects will always form the backbone of the curriculum offered to overseas students at Israel’s universities, but in order to continue to grow and be attractive in a competitive environment of international study opportunities, Israeli academic programming needs to continue to evolve together with the student it is trying to attract.

For Americans Who Served with IDF, Service Continues on Campus

Wednesday, August 15th, 2012

Visit http://israelcampusbeat.org for the latest Israel trends and events on campus.

Many campus Israel groups have brought Israeli soldiers to speak at their schools in recent years because they value the insights and perspectives IDF veterans bring to the campus Israel dialogue. But some people who have had life-changing experiences serving in the Israel Defense Forces later earn their college degree in the United States. These students offer a unique view on Israel, based on their experience, and their advocacy on campus conveys that.

Sam Besser, who enrolled at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign after serving nearly two years in the IDF, noted that he came to campus with perspectives that differ from those of his peers. “It is unfortunate that so many people are misguided by lies and it’s even scarier that a lot of American Jews don’t have the knowledge to combat these lies and untruths,” he said.

Although he knows more than many other students, Besser is careful not to preach or bombard people with more information than they can process. He encourages people to develop their own opinions after they have gathered reliable information.

Israel Campus Beat spoke with three American-born IDF veterans who have returned to the U.S. after completing their military service. Each has been involved — or plans to become involved — in campus Israel advocacy efforts. They told their stories and explained how their army service has turned them into effective and authentic voices for Israel.

*** David Abraham, who will begin graduate school at Teachers College at Columbia University in the fall, earned his bachelor’s degree at the University of Arizona prior to serving in the IDF. Now, looking forward, he sees a tangible change in his level of advocacy.

“While in college, talking about and supporting Israel just seemed like the right thing to do. I didn’t have [as much of a] physical connection to Israel, [but] I never really considered the option of not being an advocate on campus,” Abraham explained. “Now that I have done the army and I am about to attend graduate school at Columbia University, I see the importance of Israel for the Jewish people in a completely different light.”

Abraham grew up in a Zionist household where he received what he described as a typical education from Hebrew school and “stories of [his] Mom’s trips to Israel were just as important as going over the nightly math homework.” After spending a gap year in Israel on the Nativ program, studying in Jerusalem and volunteering Be’er Sheva, Abraham fell in love with the language and mix of cultures in Israel. When he finished college, he wanted to return to Israel.

“I found the only plausible way to integrate into society was to join the IDF, where I would feel that connection of tradition and history to the modern day Jewish people while also learning the language,” he explained.

Abraham joined the IDF through a program called Garin Tzabar, which places groups of 20+ immigrants together on a kibbutz before they join the army. Although he was excited about this opportunity, he was nervous about the uncertainty of what would happen.

“One of the most special things about the army is that it places people together who never would have had the opportunity to meet while at the same time everyone is thrown into a similar confusion and hardness that they have never experienced before,” he explained. Additionally, he became fairly fluent in Hebrew and gained what he described as the mental ability to do anything, which he finds applicable outside of the army.

After serving in the army for two years in the Armored brigade, first as a tank driver and then a tank commander, Abraham was given responsibility for training new soldiers in fighting tactics in the tank before they defended the country’s borders.

“I felt as though from that moment on I could go anywhere in Israel or the world and be seen as an Israeli Jew, and not just a Jew, and that meant a lot to me,” he said. “It was as if I had put my foot into society and was now able to go after whatever I desired. The army or just contributing to society in some way was the key to making it with the Israeli people and I had successfully completed that.”

Need an Israel Advocacy Idea? Ask Herzl

Tuesday, August 7th, 2012

Visit http://israelcampusbeat.org for the latest Israel trends and events on campus

As campus Israel groups and leaders begin formulating their plans for next year, the search for innovative ways to achieve their goals commences. Where do they look for new and effective programming?

In past years, students turned to the people they knew for advice or strived to build creative plans on their own. While these approaches can yield strong results, imagine what could be achieved with a nationally networked resource that provides the best of all worlds — tested, proven programming ideas and step-by-step details of best practices for impacting the campus environment.

This year, it is no dream: Savvy campus leaders will be able to access the vast collected experiences of a nationwide movement of campus Israel supporters. It all comes down to two words: Ask Herzl.

When it launches next month, Ask Herzl will serve as a resource for Israel advocates who want “ready to run” programs for their campuses. The website, currently running in beta mode, offers links to program plans that address a wide and growing range of themes and topics. The site, initiated by the Israel on Campus Coalition, also provides a networking space where students and professionals can collaborate on mutual challenges and forge new initiatives.

Ask Herzl emerged in response to a need expressed by campus activists and professionals who wanted a resource that would remain constant even as student leaders graduated and staff people moved on. In the fast-paced campus environment, people felt they missed out on many good ideas simply because they didn’t notice them when they were offered, or the person who knew about them had graduated or moved on.

In light of constant turnover that occurs on campus — every four years the entire student population changes, and professionals come and go — students need a consistent address for ideas and answers. While the project aims to meet campus needs, the website can be used by anyone seeking to educate, engage, and advocate for Israel, including high school educators, college Israel-related professionals, Jewish communal professional and post-college professionals.

“We worked with students and professionals from around the country to make Ask Herzl a relevant, useful tool,” said Stephen Kuperberg, Executive Director of the Israel on Campus Coalition. “We believe this will provide an incredible resource to activists and a great forum for students and professionals to share experiences and best practices.”

ICC developed Ask Herzl in collaboration with a committee that includes students, professionals and programmers from campus and non-campus communities.

Penn State Hillel’s assistant director, Audrey Bloomberg, who is part of the advisory committee, is excited that the project will streamline programs.

“There are so many opportunities that come to our inboxes each year about Israel programming and resources,” she said, “I can’t wait to have all of that information in one easy location instead of searching through old files and emails!”

Shoshanna Howard, the World Zionist Organization’s national project manager, said she was happy to play a part in creating this new resource. “We want to ensure the best Israel and Zionist educational programs are accessible to students, community leaders and everyone in between,” she remarked, “and we see Ask Herzl as an avenue to achieve this.”

Tzvi Raviv, who directs the Rutgers Hillel Center for Israel Engagement and also helped develop the website, went even further, saying, “Ask Herzl has the potential to be a game-changer in Israel advocacy on campus by connecting the nodes of the pro-Israel network.”

The website’s interactive features include a tool for rating and critiquing speakers as well as a mechanism for rating programs recently run on college campuses. Awards, labeled The Theo Awards, offer incentive grants of up to $1,000 for top-notch submitted materials and cash prizes to individuals and campuses that demonstrate commitment to Israel advocacy programming through website engagement and submission of quality resources. Raviv noted that the grants make Ask Herzl particularly attractive to activists who need support in order to implement their ideas.

Sam Greenberg, who served as Hillel co-president and Israel chair at Yale University, had long thought about a site similar to Ask Herzl, so he was pleased to have an opportunity to help develop it.

Combining the Israel and Jewish Narratives

Tuesday, July 31st, 2012

Visit http://israelcampusbeat.org for the latest Israel trends and events on campus.

The American Jewish community is rightly concerned about Israel’s standing among college students, especially among college students who identify as Jews. Community leaders reason that the attitudes towards Israel that develop among college students today will shape the way America and the American Jewish community relate to Israel tomorrow.

Contradictory or confusing messages regarding how American students view Israel compete for the attention of community leaders.

Peter Beinart uses anecdotes and interviews to claim that many Jewish students are alienated by Israel’s policies and societal values and at risk to being lost to the Jewish community.

Others, like Steven M. Cohen and Samuel Adams, authors of a recent Workmen’s Circle survey, rely on polling data and survey responses to claim that attachment to Israel is stronger among current Jewish students and recent graduates than among their older compatriots, even as support for particular policies regarding the Israeli-Palestinian conflict may be falling.

Mitchell Bard of the American Israeli Cooperative Enterprise (AICE) uses a 2011 study by Public Opinion Strategies to claim that 66% of current Jewish college students feel close to Israel, nearly equaling the 68% of all American Jews who report feeling that way.

The challenge confronting those who determine how Jewish community funds are expended and create strategies for facilitating the Israel conversation on campus is to make sense of these apparently conflicting claims and direct the Jewish community’s response accordingly.

A closer look at these claims may help clear the confusion. Cohen and Adam’s findings — that current students and recent graduates feel attached to Israel while objecting to Israel’s policies — support a less dramatic reading of Beinart’s interviews and anecdotes. They also confirm the findings of a 2011 study by Fern Oppenheim of Applied Marketing Innovations that while 85% of the younger generation either supports Israel (20%) or are open to support of Israel (65%), the underlying image of Israel is that it represents a society that does not reflect the values of this generation of Americans.

This interpretation of the studies’ findings resonates for many of us who work with college students as educators for the Jewish community. It is also a cause for concern: The attachment to Israel that is dominant among Jewish college students is not deep and does not necessarily represent a personal identification with the Jewish state.

Personal identification that comes from the core of one’s being would be more resilient than the “attachment” reported in the studies cited above. It will develop when Israel is perceived as reflecting students’ deeply held values, is connected with their personal Jewish identity, or is a natural extension of their affiliation with a global Jewish people. Lacking such personal identification with Israel, students’ current “attachment” is subject to the corrosive power of anti-Israel rhetoric and of the publicity given to Israeli policies that are deemed objectionable by many of their generation.

Two strategies are available to create a more permanent personal identification with Israel and Israeli society. Oppenheim articulates one of these. “The best way to connect Americans to Israel,” she writes, “is by introducing the human face of the Israeli people – their fairness and decency, indomitable spirit, creativity, morality, diversity of opinion, etc. …we need to talk more about Israelis/Israeli society and less about the State of Israel.”

This understanding has led in Philadelphia to “Israel Encounters,” a strategy of Mifgash in which American college students share experiences with Israelis of different walks of life and have the opportunity to put a personal face on Israeli society. It also shaped Hillel’s programmatic response to the BDS Conference organized at the University of Pennsylvania last winter.

The second strategy is to use students’ Israel experiences to tell the “Jewish” story as well as the “Israel” story and to showcase Israel in the context of Jewish peoplehood. With minor adjustments, Birthright Israel becomes a journey of Jewish exploration as well as an exploration of Israel; Israel cultural programs on campus allow students to experience the excitement of belonging to a global Jewish community as well as the richness of Israeli life. By connecting Jewish students’ experience of Israel with a deepening of their personal Jewish experience and with their sense of being part of a historical and global Jewish people, a deeper, more permanent identification with Israel as the Jewish homeland may be established.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/on-campus-indepth/combining-the-israel-and-jewish-narratives/2012/07/31/

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