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October 1, 2016 / 28 Elul, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Canada’

Quebec Bill 59 Seeking to Protect Muslims by Quashing Free Speech

Sunday, September 11th, 2016

Quebec’s Bill 59, titled “An Act to enact the Act to prevent and combat hate speech and speech inciting violence and to amend various legislative provisions to better protect individuals,” has been raising concerns among Quebec residents and people across Canada. As the Center for Inquiry (CFI) has put it, “Human Rights actions in one province often set precedents for other jurisdictions,” and the unusually aggressive measures of Bill 59, should they become law, may threaten free speech everywhere in Canada.

Bill 59, introduced in June 2015, would allow the Quebec Human Rights Commission (QHRC) to censor speech that promotes “fear of the other.” It doesn’t provide details as to what constitutes such fear, which probably leaves the definition up to the QHRC, and its president, one Jacques Frémount. Back in 1964, US Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart described his threshold test for obscenity (as opposed to legitimate film and literature) saying, “I know it when I see it.” This vague approach is bad enough when it comes to censuring x-rated media, but when it comes to actual free speech, the core of democracy, such vagueness is the stuff of state tyranny.

The CFI points out that the bill’s section 3 allows reporting of hate speech that hasn’t occurred but is anticipated. The section states: “The person can also report any situation that could contravene the prohibitions in section 2, in particular if the person has knowledge that such speech is about to be engaged in or disseminated or if the person has been asked to engage in or disseminate such speech.”

The third item of the bill’s Section 17 sets forth a proposed public record of those who have contravened this proposed legislation: “For the purposes of this Act, the Commission also … maintains an up-to-date list of persons who have been the subject of a decision concluding that they contravened a prohibition under section 2 and makes the list available on its website.”

Section 20 stipulates fines to be paid at between $1,000 and $10,000 with doubling if a prior contravention has occurred.

Section 24 goes after the livelihood of educators who have crossed the QHRC, suggesting that “a person whose name is on the list kept by the Commission … is considered to exhibit behavior that could reasonably pose a threat for the physical or emotional safety of the students.”

Pen Canada has stated that “Bill 59 poses a significant threat to free expression in Québec. Although this piece of legislation aims to combat hate speech and speech inciting violence specifically, its broad language coupled with restrictive prohibitions and significant penalties will place a chill on the expression of legitimate ideas and debate.”

“Not only does Bill 59 prohibit citizens from engaging in or disseminating hate speech, but also from acting in a way that causes the speech to be disseminated,” Pen Canada continues. “This language casts an alarmingly wide net. For those in heated political discussions, will the defense of ‘legitimately informing the public’ be sufficient against anonymous complaints to the Commission?”

A petition to “Stop Quebec Bill 59” spells out what the more polite websites objecting to the bill have not said: “People are trying to impose Islamic blasphemy law right here in Canada, RIGHT NOW! You may or may not have heard about the Quebec Bill 59 but it will affect us all. Bill 59 will enforce Islamic Sharia Law, making it a crime to question or criticize or ridicule an idea. This is a law that would explicitly infringe upon our rights to free speech. Be it in person, on a street, or even on the internet.”

And if you haven’t yet clicked away to add your name to the petition, the authors conclude: “This bill is not only not needed but flies in the face of our Charter of Rights and Freedoms. It criminalizes criticism of Islam and anything considered an Islamic practice (Honor killings, honor rape, female genital mutilation, female oppression, and beating of wives and children).”

Constitutional attorney Julius Grey commented recently that, “Quebec is not yet a police state, but it is an inspector-state.” True to that definition, Bill 59 has been adopted in principle by Québec’s National Assembly and is currently being studied in detail by the Committee on Institutions. Once the committee releases its report and the National Assembly votes to adopt it, the bill could become law.

JNi.Media

Political Hitman – Stand Up, Don’t Sit With Your Heads Down [audio]

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

When you see injustice and lies on your college campuses, what do you do? Stand up and fight, or sit quietly and hope that the haters fade away? Listen to this powerful interview with Israelis in Canada who are telling you what Israel is REALLY like.
#StandWithUs
Political Hitman 07Sept2016 – PODCAST

Israel News Talk Radio

Conspiracy Theory and Aliens Expert Barry Chamish, 64

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016

Canadian-born Israeli writer and public speaker Barry Chamish passed away at age 64. He is best known for his conspiracy theory regarding the Yitzhak Rabin assassination, which received a great deal of support at the time, especially on the right. In addition, Chamish wrote extensively on Unidentified Flying Objects, particularly their sightings in Israel in the 1990s. Chamish’s work was featured on four episodes of the NBC-TV program Sightings as well as a half-hour of prime time coverage on FOX-TV. He also won the 1987 Israeli Scrabble Tournament.

His son Ariel posted the following eulogy on Facebook:

“With great sorrow I must announce the untimely passing of my father, journalist and author Barry Chamish, at age 64. It isn’t my habit to expose in public (or in private) heartfelt feelings that aren’t well wrapped and protected in a plethora of metaphors and amorphous images, clearly the result of my complex relationship with my father, whom, regretfully, I haven’t seen for close to nine years.

“Since the day he left I’ve chosen consciously to distance my soul from the fragility of depending emotionally on another person. For years this meant especially my connection to him. I’ve chosen to ignore the complexity of his personality and to justify my own inability to deal with a complex situation using imaginary universal rules that helped me suppress and keep away from the pain involved in the connection to a man I loved. I think both of us were this way, but he at least tried. I, on the other hand, in my selfishness, was looking for the easy way out, lying to myself that the Atlantic ocean is wide enough to keep us apart forever. And, new age cliché that I am, when I finally remembered — it was too late.

“At this moment of temporary weakness I want to thank you for the first time in my life for what I inherited from you, despite the fact that on the face of it I’ve become a man who is different from you: the anti-establishmentarianism and the anarchism, the critical thinking and the ability to express it in writing, the penchant for Rock and Roll and marijuana, an uncompromising faith in your own righteousness, your impressive ability to survive and, above all, the pure innocence that made you believe the world can be improved.

“I’m not really sure how much you believed in metaphysics, but on the outside chance that you believed enough and that your soul is listening somewhere out there, I ask for forgiveness. Forgive me for being too weak to say all these things when I still could. I’m sorry I didn’t try hard enough. I love you and I’m proud of you for your crazy legacy. I forgive you everything.

“Your only son, Ariel Chamish.”

Click here to visit the late Barry Chamish website.

David Israel

British Airlines Trims Food Service on Economy Flights

Monday, August 15th, 2016

If you’re reading this and flying to Europe on British Airways, you may want to pack yourself a little something to eat.

The national British carrier has just cut its food service in the wake of Brexit, the separation of the United Kingdom from the rest of the European Union.

British Airways is down to to one meal only for economy passengers on flights under eight and a half hours. This includes flights between the UK to the United States and Canada.

The same belt-tightening measure has been applied to premium economy passengers on flights under seven hours.

“We offer customers on all of our trans-Atlantic flights a three-course meal, bar service and snacks, and on our longer trans-Atlantic flights, including to the West Coast, customers are offered an extra meal during the flight,” said a spokesperson for the airline.

The above does not necessarily apply to passengers who order kosher and/or glatt kosher pre-packaged meals.

Hana Levi Julian

Surrealist Postmodern Jewish Artist Esther Warkov Showing at WAG

Monday, August 8th, 2016

Esther Warkov, a surrealist postmodern Jewish artist living in Winnipeg, Canada, grew up on the Canadian prairies, but her stylized motifs reveal the clear influence of the Eastern European immigrant community into which she was born (in 1941).

“Warkov is adamant that her paintings do not tell a specific story and invites the viewer to meander through her work,” says Andrew Kear, the Winnipeg Art Gallery curator of Historical Canadian Art, which is showing Warkov’s paintings from the 1960s to the 1980s. WAG is actually showing two Jewish artists who dabble in the surreal, Warkov and Marc Chagall, who apparently was no stranger to Winnipeg. “It is exceptional to view Warkov and Chagall alongside each other; the stylistic parallels are stunning,” says Kear.

The WAG presented Esther Warkov’s first solo exhibition in 1964. Since then, the Gallery has acquired nearly 50 works by Warkov, spanning her career as one of Manitoba’s most distinctive artists. In recent years the Gallery has received a number of Warkov’s large multi-panelled paintings, a body of work that earned her national attention beginning in the 1970s. This exhibition showcases one of her most celebrated and defining periods of creative production.

Subtly psychedelic, Warkov’s stylized motifs reveal the influence of the Eastern European community into which she was born. Her motley scenes integrate a recurring and morphing array of images—townsfolk, historical figures, insects, and engine parts—appropriated from the old photographs, postcards, medical textbooks, and department store catalogues the artist scavenged from local junk shops and second-hand stores.

Warkov’s refreshingly idiosyncratic paintings engage with matters of race, ethnicity, social history, and cultural memory. At the same time, her work does not correspond to specific intentions, revealing no coherent stories. “When most people look at my work,” Warkov told Maclean’s in 1977, “they want to know what the symbolism is—and the truth is I don’t have any.” In the absence of an encompassing narrative, Warkov invites the viewer to meander, as one might through a found box of nameless photographs, and simply revel in the partial, provisional, and ultimately inarticulate strangeness of her painted worlds.

Esther Warkov: Paintings, 1960s-1980s

Winnipeg Art Gallery, 300 Memorial Boulevard, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3C 1V1

Tel 204.786.6641

Through October 16, 2016

Sat., Sun, Tue. Wed. Thu. 11 AM- 5 PM, Fri. 11 AM – PM, Mon. closed.

JNi.Media

Tuesday 223 American Olim Made Israel their Home

Tuesday, July 19th, 2016

On Tuesday, July 19, a flight with 223 olim from the US and Canada landed in Ben-Gurion International Airport, where a ceremony was held to welcome them to Israel.

KKL-JNF World Chairman Danny Atar said that “the Aliyah to Israel is the foundation on which the Zionist enterprise stands. It is the clearest expression of our love to the land of Israel.”

“The strategic cooperation between KKL-JNF and Nefesh Be’Nefesh assists many diaspora Jews to find their way to Israel, build their home there, integrate in the Israeli society and contribute to the prosperity of Israel,” Atar said, adding, “I am sure that many Olim will encounter KKL-JNF down the road … We are here for you and proud of you.”

The 223 newcomers include Jews from 17 US states and two Canadian provinces, former servicemen from three different US Armed Forces units, families of all sizes, and young professionals.

JNi.Media

Israel Among Top Five Countries on WHO 2015 Life Expectancy Chart

Friday, May 20th, 2016

Only 22 countries around the globe have reached an average life expectancy at birth greater than 80 years, according to the World Health Organization’s Global Health Observatory (GHO) data, which would suggest that if one is planning to retire abroad, one should consider those countries most seriously.

Life expectancy at birth reflects the overall mortality level of a population. It summarizes the mortality pattern that prevails across all age groups in a given year – children and adolescents, adults and the elderly. Global life expectancy at birth in 2015 was 71.4 years (73.8 years for females and 69.1 years for males), ranging from 60.0 years in the WHO African Region to 76.8 years in the WHO European Region, giving a ratio of 1.3 between the two regions. Women live longer than men all around the world. The gap in life expectancy between the sexes was 4.5 years in 1990 and had remained almost the same by 2015 (4.6).

Global average life expectancy increased by 5 years between 2000 and 2015, the fastest increase since the 1960s. Those gains reverse declines during the 1990s, when life expectancy fell in Africa because of the AIDS epidemic, and in Eastern Europe following the collapse of the Soviet Union. The 2000-2015 increase was greatest in the WHO African Region, where life expectancy increased by 9.4 years to 60 years, driven mainly by improvements in child survival, and expanded access to antiretrovirals for treatment of HIV.

As to the friendly global race of whose citizens get to live longer, the top countries are, in descending order: Japan – 83.7, Switzerland – 83.4, Singapore – 83.1, Italy – 82.7, and Israel – 82.5. The US did not make the 80+ club in 2015, with only 79.3 years’ life expectancy. Neither did the Russian Federation – 70.5.

Israel’s neighbors are definitely not ideal locations for retirement: Egypt – 70.9, Jordan – 74.1, Lebanon – 74.9, and Syria – 64.5 (if you’re lucky). Nigeria stands out with 54.5 life expectancy, along with Angola – 52.4, Burkina Faso – 59.9, Burundi – 59.6, Cameroon – 57.3, Central African Republic – 52.5, Chad – 53.1, Guinea – 59, and Guinea-Bissau – 58.9.

So, here is the list of world countries where you’ll get to grow older than 80, barring unexpected circumstances:

Japan – 83.7
Switzerland – 83.4
Singapore – 83.1
Italy – 82.7
Israel – 82.5
France – 82.4
Sweden – 82.4
Canada – 82.2
Luxembourg – 82
Netherlands – 81.9
Norway – 81.8
Malta – 81.7
New Zealand – 81.6
Austria – 81.5
Belgium – 81.1
Finland – 81.1
Germany – 81
Denmark – 80.6
Chile – 80.5
Cyprus – 80.5

JNi.Media

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/israel-among-top-five-countries-on-who-2015-life-expectancy-chart/2016/05/20/

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