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August 30, 2016 / 26 Av, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘car’

Three Jewish Youths Suspected Of Torching Arab Car In Response To Tel-Aviv Terror Attack

Thursday, July 14th, 2016

By Jonathan Benedek/TPS

Nazareth (TPS) – The Shin Bet (Israel Security Agency) published on Thursday that it arrested three Jewish teenagers who allegedly torched a car in an Arab village last month and sprayed the words “price tag” and “revenge” in Hebrew, in response to a deadly terror attack in Tel Aviv.

The Nazareth Magistrates Court has extended the detention of two of the suspects until Sunday, while the third minor who is suspected of assisting the two others will remain under arrest until Friday. The prosecution intends to file an indictment next week.

The 15-year-old suspects, who were arrested on Sunday and Monday this week, allegedly committed the nationalistically-motivated attack in response to the terrorist attack at the Sarona market in Tel Aviv that killed 4 Israelis.

According to the police, the suspects confessed to committing the arson attack. The suspects also reportedly revealed during the investigation that they had already planned a revenge attack for a long time beforehand.

However, the suspects’ attorney Lior Bar-Zohar challenged the veracity of the reported confession, particularly due to the fact that they had been prevented from meeting with an attorney until Wednesday night.

“The heavy-handed, intensive interrogation combined with not meeting with an attorney and the fact that these are normative minors who have never been arrested, casts a heavy shadow on the confession,” said Bar-Zohar. “We expect the court to examine the admissibility of the confession and whether it is based on real evidence, or just on manipulations and threats by the interrogators.”

Bar-Zohar belongs to Honenu, a legal aid organization that represents and defends legal rights of right-wing Jewish suspects. Honenu echoed Bar-Zohar’s arguments in a statement on Thursday.

“Denying minors of the basic right to receive legal representation has become the norm in cases of property crimes such as this one,” said Honenu. “Unfortunately, we do not see the same level of determination in investigating the hundreds of incidents in recent months in which Arabs threw rocks and molotov cocktails at Israeli targets.”

Michael Bachner contributed to this article.

TPS / Tazpit News Agency

Car Damaged After Arabs Pour Oil on Road

Tuesday, July 5th, 2016

A car spun out of control near Beitar Ilit in Gush Etzion early Tuesday afternoon.

Arabs once again poured oil on the main road near the Husan bypass, causing a car to lose control and crash.

There’s no information on the driver at the moment.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Headlights On

Saturday, October 31st, 2015

Starting Sunday, headlights are required on intercity roads in Israel. Trucks, buses, and motorcycles have to put headlights on inside cities too.

Jewish Press News Briefs

UPDATED: Car Rams Through Gush Etzion Checkpoint, Guard Injured

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

UPDATED REPORT 2:10pm

A silver Toyota broke threw the Gush Etzion checkpoint headed towards Jerusalem. The car hit a guard at the checkpoint and injured him.

The car then did a U-Turn back into Gush Etzion, and security forces are chasing after it. Security Forces opened fire.

It appears the car was stolen from Beitar Ilit.

Waiting for further confirmation on details.

There may have also been an event at the Hizme checkpoint, but no other information is available at this point.

 

INITIAL REPORT: 1:58pm

A car tried to run through the Gush Etzion checkpoint near the tunnel roads.  Guards at the site put up the barriers and opened fire in order top stop the driver.

The car crashed and one person was lightly injured.

No other information is available at this time.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Vacationing Tip: Get Lost

Friday, August 9th, 2013

I’m on vacation this month, so there won’t be a regular column.  Or at least there wasn’t going to be.  The questions keep coming in.

Dear Mordechai,

I keep losing my stuff.  What do I do?

Lost

STEP 1: Check your person.  (Your person is you.  That’s just how people say it.  I don’t think you’re expected to carry around a smaller person and go, “Hi, I’m Mordechai, and this is my person.”  But if you do, you should probably check him as well.)

STEP 2: Make sure to check the same five places 68 times.  Especially if it’s not a likely place for it to be.  For example, if you’re looking for your car keys, make sure to keep checking the fridge.

STEP 3: Call for the item.  Continuously say things like, “I can’t believe this!  Where is it?”  Like the item is finally going to break down and tell you.

STEP 4: Calm Down.  Whenever I lose something, my wife ends up finding it, and whenever my wife loses something, I end up finding it.  Now I know what you’re thinking.  You’re thinking we should stop hiding each others’ stuff.  But it really has more to do with panicking.

STEP 5: Buy a new one.  As soon as you open the package, the old one will turn up.  Guaranteed.  For example, if you lose your car in a parking lot, the best way to find it is to buy a new car.  If that doesn’t work, you can use the new car to drive around the parking lot looking for the old one.

On the other hand, maybe the reason we can’t find anything is because we keep buying new things, and everything keeps getting lost under everything else.

 

Dear Mordechai,

Why does everyone around me move so slowly?  Especially when I’m in a rush.

No Time

 

 This is definitely a problem.  These people are everywhere.

For example, there are the people in front of us one the supermarket checkout line, who, even though they’ve been waiting the same 25 minutes you were, don’t even start looking for their supermarket card until they get to the front of the line.  Like it’s a total surprise to them that they need a Shoprite card.  In Shoprite.

Or how about the person directly in front of you who leaves his cart in line and goes off to do his shopping, even though you got in line behind him in the first place because he had a pretty empty cart?  But then he looked back at your cart, and he got some ideas.

“Orange juice!  Where’d you find orange juice?”

“Over by the refrigerated juices.”

“Ooooh!  I’ll be right back.”

There are also a lot of people in your way on the road.  Now I don’t begrudge other people for being on the road.  But sometimes I can’t go because the person in front of me is stopped, and has his window rolled down, and is talking to someone who’s sitting in a car facing the other way, who also has his window rolled down, and I want to yell, “Get a cell phone!”

But you know how your mother always told you, “If you do things quickly, you’ll just mess everything up and have to do it over?”  Everyone else’s mother told them the same thing, and they’ve taken it to heart.

But of course, on the other hand, there’s a pretty big chance that if you do things slowly, you’ll mess them up anyway.  At least if you go faster the first time, you’ll have more time to do it over.

 

Dear Mordechai,

Is it possible I just need a vacation?

Stressed

That depends.  How annoyed do you get by everyday things?  For example, I recently came across a poll of the top 20 irritating pieces of technology, and apparently, the invention that annoys us most is car alarms.  Of course, the main reason this annoys everyone is that no one knows what their own car alarms sounds like, so when it goes off in middle of the night, they’re just as annoyed as everyone else, and instead of going out and turning it off, they spends hours trying to block it out and to fall asleep.  So I’m thinking that maybe we should be able to personalize our car alarms, like ringtones.  For example, I would make mine sound like an ice cream truck, so that as soon as a burglar sets it off, everyone will run outside.

Another item on the list was printers.  Everyone knows how frustrating printers can be.  You have a tray that can hold 100 pieces of paper, but if you put in more than 5, it gets stuck.  And sometimes, for no reason at all, it will tell you that you’re low on ink.

“Proceed?”

Yes, of course proceed!  I spend $85 on that cartridge, and the papers are still coming out fine!

But when the printer breaks down, what do you do?  It has one button.  You press the button, and if that doesn’t work, you press the button again.  There’s no way this button is doing anything.

Another item on the list was alarm clocks.  Those guys take so much abuse.  It’s not their fault it’s 7:00.

But if you’ve gotten to a point where you’re finding technology inconvenient – technology, which is supposed to at least be better than not having technology, — then maybe it’s time for a vacation.

 

Dear Mordechai,

Where do you suggest I go to get away from it all?

Still Here

 

If you’re looking to get away from the irritations of technology and people in your way, the best place to go is Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.  My wife and I took the kids there recently, and it’s an excellent place to go if you want to get lost.  For example, one thing we did was walk through a gigantic corn maze.  Because getting lost while driving wasn’t enough for us.         

We actually spent a lot of our trip lost, because as it turns out, all farms look exactly the same, and there’s no one to ask directions from but the cows on the side of the road.  And we even did a lot of the steps of what to do if something’s lost: We called around for the place, we calmed down, we went down the same roads 68 times, but nothing.  And the whole time the kids are in the back going, “Look a cow!”  “Look! Another cow!”

Our GPS couldn’t find us either.  In fact, before we left, I had tried, unsuccessfully, to borrow a better GPS just in case this happened.  But then my wife put it in perspective.  “Were going to visit the Amish,” she said.  “We need a GPS?”

Because yeah, we visited the Amish.  The big draw of the Amish, apparently, is that they live without any of the conveniences of modern life, such as cell phones.  Except for one Amish guy that I saw while waiting for a buggy ride (mostly what you do with buggy rides is wait for them) in a town called “Ronks”, which, I have to admit, is a fun name for a town.  Ronks Ronks Ronks.  It sounds like a duck clearing its throat.

I later asked a non-Amish tour guide about it:

TOUR GUIDE: “The Amish don’t use electricity, because they don’t want any wires coming into their house from the outside world.”

ME: “I saw a guy on a cell phone today.”

TOUR GUIDE: “Um… Cell phones don’t have wires.”

But the Amish do have it tough when it comes to parental discipline.

“You kids don’t know how good you have it.  When I was your age, we didn’t even have… Wait.  You don’t have that either.  Well, we had to walk… Well, you have to walk too.  Oh, I got one!  When I was your age, we didn’t even have covered bridges.”

“Whoa, really?”

“Yeah.  All our bridges were uncovered.”

“Wow!  What did you do?”

So where do they take vacations?  Amusement parks, apparently.         I see them at every one.

 

Got a question for “You’re Asking Me?”  Send me a smoke signal.  My cell phone’s still missing.  Or maybe call it, and I’ll listen for the ring.

Mordechai Schmutter

If He Is Released, I Will No Longer Be Able to Live

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

Editor’s note: Adi Moses was eight years old when she was injured in a Palestinian terrorist attack that killed her pregnant mother and five-year-old brother.

You know the story of my family. In 1987 a terrorist threw a firebomb at the car my family was traveling in. He murdered my mother and my brother Tal, and injured my father, my brother, his friend and myself. It is a story you know. But me, you do not really know. I was eight years old when this happened.

While my father was rolling me in the sand to extinguish my burning body, I looked in the direction of our car and watched as my mother burned in front of my eyes.

This story did not end that day in 1987. This story is the difficult life I have led since then. I am still eight years old, hospitalized in critical condition. Screaming from pain. Bandaged from head to toe. And my head is not the same. No longer full of golden long hair. The head is burnt. The face, back, the legs and arms, burnt. I am surrounded by family members, but my mother is not with me. Not hugging and caressing. She is not the one changing my bandages.

In the room next door, my brother Tal is screaming in pain. I call out to him to count sheep with me so he can fall asleep. Three months later, little Tal dies of his wounds. I am seated, all bandaged up, on a chair in the cemetery and I watch as my little brother is buried.

For many months I am forbidden to be out in the sun because of the burns, so I wear long pants and long-sleeved shirts to school. In July and August as well. And under the clothes I wear a pressure suit meant to [prevent hypertrophic] scarring. It is painful and hot and itchy.

Here I am at twelve years old, undergoing another operation to correct a scar that limited movement in my leg. And then I am celebrating my bat mitzvah. And my mother is not at the celebration. So I cry quietly at night and write to her.

I grow older. I don’t like that people in the street stare at me, don’t like it when the cashier at the supermarket asks, “Oh, child, what happened to you?” I don’t like it that every such look and every such question make me run and cry.

I reach the age of fourteen and still live in Alfei Menashe. I have a father, an older brother and friends, I am a good pupil. But I also have unbearable scars. I do not have a mother. So I lay in the road and say to myself that if a car comes, whatever happens, happens. But it doesn’t happen. So I pick myself up and return home. All those years of adolescence, my friends’ preferred activity is to go to the beach. But I don’t go because I have scars. Because I am burnt. And I am ashamed.

Then I am eighteen and want to enlist but I am not drafted. The army refuses to take responsibility for my scars. So I volunteer in the military and serve for a year and a half.

At college I meet new people who, of course, ask me what happened to me. I respond “terror attack.” And they always answer “wow, really? I thought hot water spilled on you when you were little.”

Today I am thirty-four years old, exactly my mother’s age at the time of the attack. From now on she will forever be younger than me. And still, at least four times a week I answer questions about what happened to me.

I am thirty-four years old but the last few days I have returned to being that eight-year-old facing that burning car and waiting for her mother to come out of it. Yitzhak Rabin, who was minister of defense at the time of the attack, promised my dad they would catch the terrorist. And they did. And they sentenced him. To two life sentences and another seventy-two years in prison. And you Cabinet ministers? With the wave of a hand you decided to free him – he who caused all of this story.

Adi Moses

Police Investigating Attempted Jewish Lynch Victims

Saturday, June 22nd, 2013

Last we reported on the attempted lynching of 3 Jews, by an Arab mob near A-Tor. The Jews were afraid to shoot, as they didn’t want to risk getting arrested by the police for defending themselves.

The story has now gotten even more absurd.

Aryeh King reports on his Facebook page that police have now opened an investigation against the 3 Jews.

Why?

Because they left their car in the middle of the road and were blocking traffic!

Jewish Press News Briefs

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/police-investigating-attempted-jewish-lynch-victims/2013/06/22/

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