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July 22, 2014 / 24 Tammuz, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘car’

The Secretive Casualties of War

Thursday, November 22nd, 2012

During the recent Opration Pillar of Defense An Israeli 35-year-old man told his wife that he had been recalled to the reserves, said good bye to her and to their children and headed south – not to the Gaza border, but, instead, to the hotel Le Meridien in Eilat, to celebrate his unexpected freedom with his mistress, the daily Yediot Aharonoth reported Thursday.

The mistress called the wife from the road, pretending to be an IDF official, and informed her that her husband had been drafted and sent to the border.

As luck would have it, the husband, who took his wife’s car to save on gas fuel, made one mistake: he parked his car in front of the hotel garbage cans. A sanitation truck driver who came the next morning to pick up the garbage called the number listed on the car bumper, obtained the woman’s cell number and called her. After a short conversation, the woman realized that her husband was engaged in an entirely non-militaristic activity.

The woman hired a team detectives documented the husband’s southern adventure, and she is planning to sue foe divorce this morning. Last night, unaware that his life as he knew it was over, the husband called to tell his wife about the rough time he was having away from her, in the army.

True story – because I saw it in Yedioth.

It’s About Time! [Video]

Monday, November 19th, 2012

Here’s a video of a settler who was stopped once too many by “non violent” foreign anarchists and Arabs blocking the highway. Her solution was simple – and I must tell you, as a cab driver in NY City back in the 1980s I had to utilize the same reasonable approach to law and order.

All I can say is that if anyone, of any sex, creed, color and ethnicity, tries to block my car with my family in it “peacefully,” in a group of youths who could be wielding rocks – I’m not sticking around to soothe his gripes. One foot on the gas, both hands on the wheel, no looking back.

Pass it on. It might just be that Israelis are finally removing the diaspora brain chip. That’s a reason for a celebration!

Of course, I’m not promoting violence here, I don’t think folks should go out of their way to ram into protesters. But if you’re surrounded by a mob and fear for your safety — put your foot to the pedal and the pedal to the metal.

By the way, all the protesters got off the road after that.

Car Blown Up in Gan Yavneh — by Criminals

Monday, November 19th, 2012

Crime must go on, even during a time of war in Israel. This morning, the residents of the town of Gan Yavneh, not far from Ashdod and well within the range of Gazan rockets, woke up to the sound of a loud explosion. An EMT unit rushed to the area and discovered a car that had been blown up, most likely by local criminals. The driver was critically injured and died at the scene despite attempts to revive him.

Breaking News: Hamas #2 Killed by IDF

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

The Shabak (Israel’s General Secret Service) just announced that Ahmed Jabari, the second in command of the Hamas military, was killed today by the IDF in a surgical strike. He was traveling in his car when it exploded.

Al-Jabari has been credited for the Hamas takeover of Gaza as well as introducing the launching of Kassam rockets into Israel.

Jabari’s son, who was in the car was also killed in the attack.

Palestinians report that the IDF also attacked in Rafiach and Han Younis leaving 8 dead.

Much of the country has now been put on alert in case of retaliatory attacks by Hamas, who have now threatened to launch missiles on Tel Aviv tonight.

Schools around Gaza have announced that school will be canceled tomorrow.

 

Ahmed Jabari with Gilad Shalit

Mom Driving into the Heart of Darkness

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

We just received this report from the Tazpit news agency: Today at 9:00 AM Israel time, a resident of Gush Talmonim was traveling with her infant (less than a year old) to the city of Modi’in. Some 300 yards before the security checkpoint of Modi’in Illit she drove straight into a crowd of Arab demonstrators with Palestinian flags, who threw down lengths of cables across the highway to block traffic.

As she was sitting there, in her car, with her baby, stuck in a line of motionless vehicles, IDF troops fired tear gas grenades at the Arabs who had reached to within a few yards from the Israeli vehicles.

Israeli media today announced that the frightening event had taken place in Samaria, meaning “out there” in the territories, where anyone who gets in trouble was, basically, asking for it. But that was a lie. The entire event, from a crowd with flags blocking the road to the crowd getting near the stuck Israeli cars, to the IDF rushing on the scene just in time – the whole thing took place only about three miles from Modi’in, well within the safe and recognized and leftist-sanctified “green line.”

That’s what the media can do to history: if reality doesn’t match our concepts, we can always move reality a few miles over to where it fits.

Don’t Tell My Wife!

Sunday, November 11th, 2012

We spent Shabbat in Ashkelon, visiting my wife’s parents. On Motzei Shabbat, my wife stayed in Ashkelon (in the red glare of the rockets fired from Gaza) so that she could take her mother for a medical treatment in the morning. I drove back to Yerushalayim with my children. Along the way, we passed a stretch of fertile farmland. The heavenly rains that had fallen during Shabbat seemed to have awakened the earth, and the pungent aroma of fresh cow manure wafted into the car. My younger boys started gagging and making jokes, the way children do about such things.

“Sheket!” I told them. “I love the smell of fresh bovine in Eretz Yisrael more than any other smell in the world. To me it’s like perfume.”

“Come off it, Abba,” my 22 year-old Golani commando responded.

I switched on the car blinker and started to pull off the highway to the side of the road.

“What are you doing?” my daughter wanted to know.

“Aahhhhhhh,” my youngest son gagged, as the overpowering smell of manure filled the car. “Are you crazy? Don’t stop here!”

But I wanted to teach them a lesson. After all, they were born in Israel. Sometimes they take it for granted. Having grown up in the Holy Land, they can easily forget that things weren’t always that way, that for nearly 2000 years, we were exiled in impure, foreign lands, and that still today, half of our Nation is wallowing away in gentile countries, not knowing the incredible blessing and joy of living in your own Jewish country, upon your own Holy Land.

“Abba! What are you doing?!” my daughter called out, as I got out of the car and trekked off into the dark field.

The truth is, if my wife had been with us, I probably wouldn’t have done it. She doesn’t like me rolling in cucumber fields. The last time I did it, she stayed angry at me for a week. She said that I ruined my clothes and stank up the car. But like my kids, she grew up in Israel too. Don’t get me wrong. They are all crazy about the country, but what smells to me like Chanel #5, smells to them like just plain and smelly cow doo.

“Abba, come back !”

“Abba!!”

Happily, I prostrated myself on the Holy Land and started to roll over and over. The earth was still damp from the rain. The soil of the fertilized field stuck to my beard. The most beautiful fragrance in the world filled up my nostrils, more exhilarating than any reefer I ever smoked in the past.

“Yeeech!” my daughter screamed.

“I’m calling, Ema!” my youngest yelled out.

The rain clouds had passed, and stars twinkled in the heavens. The Rambam writes how the greatest Sages of old would kiss the soil of the Holy Land upon reaching its borders (Laws of Kings, 5:10). The Talmud describes how Rabbi Chia bar Gamda would lovingly roll in the dust of The Holy Land in order to actualize the verse of Tehillim, “For your servants desired her stones and cherished her very dust.”

Rabba Abba would kiss the stones of Acco (Ketubot 112B). Rabbi Kook explained that he wouldn’t merely kiss the ground, which is the basis of the agricultural mitzvot dependent upon the Land, but he kissed the boulders to show the inherent holiness of the Land itself. Rashi, in his commentary to the Gemara, duplicates the verse, “For your servants desired her stones,” without adding any new information, to emphasize the holiness of the very stones of the Land of Israel – up and beyond the Land’s holiness because of the commandments that are performed in its soil.

At the very end of the classic treatise on Jewish Faith, “The Kuzari,” when the Rabbi sets off on aliyah for the Land of Israel, he quotes this same verse of Tehillim: “For your servants desired her stones and cherished her very dust,” saying, “This means that Jerusalem can only be rebuilt when the Jewish People yearn for it to such an extent that they embrace her stones and her dust” (Kuzari, 5:27).

That’s how you bring Mashiach – not by singing, “Moshiach, Moshiach, Moshiach,” but by rolling in the dust of the Eretz Yisrael and doing whatever you can to rebuild the our Nation in our Land.

Killed for Complaining About Graffiti

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

Caught this: At Prince of Peace, worshiper dies trying to stop tagger 

…a parishioner checking on the food being set up in the parking lot saw something suspicious. A young woman was spraying graffiti on a church wall. When he asked her to stop, she knocked him to the ground…a man emerged from a nearby car and opened fire, killing Ordonez and wounding the other parishioner…recently gang members had threatened violence against residents who complain about or paint over graffiti…LAPD detectives are searching for the gunman and tagger but believe some witnesses are afraid to come forward out of concern about gang reprisals. Several witnesses talked to The LA Times only on the condition of anonymity, fearing for their safety.

Searching, I found this:

Some of the most common styles of graffiti have their own names. A “tag” is the most basic writing of an artist’s name, it is simply a handstyle. A graffiti writer’s tag is his or her personalized signature. Tagging is often the example given when opponents of graffiti refer to any acts of handstyle graffiti writing (it is by far the most common form of graffiti). Tags can contain subtle and sometimes cryptic messages, and might incorporate the artist’s crew initials or other letters.

And this:

Tagging 1. (VERB) THE ACT of performing simple graffiti using spray-paint (usually cheap) and stencils. Done quickly, usually in seconds. Usually during the day.

For this you shoot to kill?

Visit My Right Word.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/my-right-word/killed-for-complaining-about-graffiti/2012/11/07/

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