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October 21, 2014 / 27 Tishri, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘car’

Stone Throwers Injure Karnei Shomron Resident

Monday, October 29th, 2012

A resident of Karnei Shomron was lightly injured Monday evening by rock throwers. The rocks were thrown as he was driving his car on Route 55 near Maaleh Shomron

The victim was treated on site by an IDF ambulance.

Jewish Gold Dealer Escapes Robbers En Route From Holland To Belgium

Monday, October 29th, 2012

It was a miracle en route to Antwerp: A gold dealer who lives in Antwerp, Belgium, was traveling in his car last Wednesday as he does every week, with a very large amount of gold in his case, B’Hadrei Haredim reported.

Driving from Holland toward Antwerp, the dealer noticed that a car was following him, but didn’t give it much thought.

He made a stop at a gas station along the highway to fill up his tank.

After he started driving about 300 meters out of the gas station, a car with blue lights ordered him to pull over. Three armed assailants got out of the car with their guns pointing at him.

The driver sped backwards into the gas station, got out of the car, grabbed his case from the back seat and ran into the store at the service station.

He shouted, “There is a robbery here!” and the shop owner immediately locked the doors and pressed an emergency alarm button. The shop was full of people at the time and the three unmasked bandits arrived on the scene within a short time brandishing their weapons.

They demanded that the owner open the doors and that the case with the gold be handed over to them. Police arrived on the scene shortly thereafter, but the criminals managed to escape.

After a thorough search, the bandits’ car was found abandoned. It had been reported stolen.

The main highway was closed due to the incident and there were traffic jams reported over the next six hours.

The Jewish man noted that when he was being interrogated by the police, he was asked if he hadn’t notice being shot at and he answered that he hadn’t. The police then showed him that the lower portion of the hood of his car had been hit by a few bullets. Apparently, the criminals used a silencer on their guns and he hadn’t realized his car had been hit.

On Shabbat, the man got an aliyah in shul and benched gomel.

Efrat Residents Block Bethlehem Access Road

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012

Residents of Efrat blocked a main access road from Bethlehem on Monday night.

The spontaneous protest came in response to an attack on an Efrat driver on that same road, which also leads to the northern entrance of Efrat.

The driver, a woman, was in shock after a massive rock was thrown at her car by Arabs in an oncoming car. The rock broke her windshield. Other than the shock, she was uninjured.

 

Everybody Is a Winner

Sunday, October 14th, 2012

I recently read a disturbing news article about a social phenomenon that is tragic beyond words.

The article stated that more people were losing their lives by committing suicide than by car crashes. This conclusion was based on a recent study by the American Journal of Public Health based on data compiled by the National Center for Health Statistics from the years 2000-2009.

The study found that vehicular fatalities during this period had declined by 25%, but deaths from suicides rose 15%. Experts, however, believe that the number is actually closer to 20%, and that many deaths listed as accidental were not. There is a cultural and religious stigma in regards to killing oneself, so some suicides were orchestrated to look unintentional.

Conversely, despite it seeming as if there are more drivers on the road – we are all to often frustrated by traffic congestion that turns highways into parking lots – and the increase in distracted drivers, the decrease in car accidents was attributed to various safety features like front and side air bags, seat belts and stricter penalties for speeding and drinking.

So why are so many people killing themselves, or attempting to, since some try but fail? I can only imagine that they are looking for a way out of lives saturated with abject misery; they feel trapped in a cage of never-ending unhappiness.

Many wake up wishing they hadn’t. Each day is emotionally traumatic and they do not even entertain the possibility of their lives getting better; they have no iota of hope that the situation they find themselves in will ever improve.

In trying to understand the mindset of a suicidal person, I imagine that it is like having your finger stuck in a flame. No matter how hard you try to pull the finger out of the fire, you cannot. You are in such torturous pain, and so desperate for the agony to stop, that you want to kill yourself to get blessed relief. You see no other option.

But their excruciating pain is not physical – it is emotional.

They are enveloped in the flames of relentless despair and hopelessness; some try to dull the pain through alcohol, drugs or unsavory distractions and behaviors. But all they manage to achieve is a temporary respite. Their finger is still in the fire and they face endless years of torment. I believe the fuel feeding this flame is a deep sense of worthlessness, an overwhelming belief that they are perpetual losers; thus they see no point in even trying to strive for success, be it socially, financially or spiritually.

They have given up, believing they have failed and will continue to do so. They feel like caged gerbils on an exercise wheel, running and running and running to no avail – as hard as they try, they get nowhere.

Sadly, the “oxygen” that feeds this extreme sense of inadequacy is often supplied by those who should have been building their egos and fortifying their sense of self, planting and nurturing the seeds of confidence and self-like that would bloom into a happy, optimistic, and emotionally healthy human being. These include mothers and fathers, siblings, spouses, teachers, neighbors, friends, colleagues, employers – even strangers.

Constant, unrelenting criticism, denigration, and belittling – whether unintentional (in a misguided attempt to motivate you to do better academically, improve your job performance, or your looks,) or deliberate – bullies trying to shore up their own low self-esteem by mocking, teasing, and even physically hurting someone they perceive to be a bigger “loser” than themselves – whittles away a person’s belief that he is worthful (as opposed to worthless) and deserving of respect.

Individually, every put down or jab is just a single straw, but thousands of these straws piling up over the years can crush the strongest back and break the sturdiest spirit.

(I remember when I was little and would walk down the street, an elderly neighbor who often sat on his porch, would call out to me, “Hey fatty!” I was a bit chubby, but what did he gain by denigrating me? I was too much of a tomboy to care how I looked, but it was a negative straw nonetheless.)

Feiglin Arrested for Praying

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012

Moshe Feiglin, head of the Manhigut Yehudit faction within the Likud party ascended up to the Temple Mount (Har Habyit) on Tuesday, as he does every month, and was arrested by the Israeli police along with Hagai Weiss for the crime of praying on the Temple Mount.

Feiglin had gone up to the Temple Mount with 30 other people. Halfway through his usual walk around the site, the police claim they saw him praying and escorted him off the mountain.

Feiglin denied he was praying at the time.

Police questioned Feiglin for 5 hours, and then upgraded his status to “arrest”. The charge was, “Actions that could have led to the endangerment of the public.”

Police demanded that Feiglin sign a guarantee that he would not visit the Temple Mount for the next 15 days, but he refused to sign it.

Feiglin told the police, “I am a free citizen, and I will not willingly suspend my liberty.”

The police brought a request to the court to extend Feiglin’s remand in jail for a few days to “investigate” the matter, but the court refused to grant it, and the police were subsequently forced to release Feiglin unconditionally.

The Israeli Police do not allow Jews to pray on the Temple Mount because the Waqf forbids it, and threaten mass violence if they catch a Jew praying.

 

Photos of Moshe Feiglin and company on the Temple Mount. Accompanying Moshe is his son David who had been seriously injured in a car accident:

Shooting Attack on Road 55 (Maaleh Shomron)

Sunday, September 30th, 2012

At least two cars were shot at on Road 55 near Maaleh Shomron on Saturday night.

One car was shot at on the curve leading into Maaleh Shomron. The shots were also heard by the guards at the Maaleh Shomron entrance. The marks on that car seemed to indicate the weapon used in the attack was an improvised gun rather than an off-the-shelf weapon.

No one was injured in the attack. The perpetrators apparently fled back to the nearby village of Azun.

Sukkot, The GPS And Mind/Body Interventions

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

I sit here mulling over the results of my latest PET Scan (Positron Emission Tomography), a nuclear medicine imaging technique which produces a three-dimensional image or picture (in color) of my innards and of the latest actions of the “bad buggars” that have invaded me (as I live through quite a serious case of cancer).

The interesting thing I am noticing in my mind/body reactions is that I am pretty calm and thinking of both the GPS and Sukkot.

The GPS (Global Positioning System) was developed in 1973 and is a satellite-based navigation system made up of a network of 24 satellites placed into orbit by the U.S. Department of Defense. GPS was originally intended for military applications, but in the 1980s, the government made the system available for civilian use. GPS works in any weather conditions, anywhere in the world, 24 hours a day. There are no subscription fees or setup charges, GPS but you do need some kind of gizmo to get it to work. Its commercial iteration is available for purchase for your car or even to walk around with and can help you find an address when you are lost.

Basically it takes your position and searches for the address you load into it and gives you visual or oral guided directions on how to get there.

I can’t seem to find the author (it may be ChaCha) of these lyrics to the GPS song on Google but I am quoting them:

“I’m driving down a road that I don’t know. I need some help along the way. I can’t see the street signs. Which way do I turn? Then I hear a familiar voice say: ‘Recalculating.’ Where am I and how do I find my way out? Make a U Turn – at the very next intersection.”

While these lyrics are bouncing around my head, I am thinking of Bnai Yisrael not long out of Egypt walking with the help of Clouds of Honor (Ananai HaKavod) directing them and protecting them. It is only generations later when they arrive in Israel (according to the Rambam, Maimonides) that they are told that now that they are home, they have to leave their houses and move into a temporary booth, sukkah, for the week of Tabernacles.

My mind wanders and wonders what Hashem was trying to teach us and alights on kind of weird idea. There is an important lesson here: to keep our internal GPS in tune with our surroundings. There is no better way to appreciate and re-think about where we are and where we are going, if not by stepping back from a place of comfort, in this case our home, and move out to a temporary dwelling.

I am frequently asked how I’ve managed to keep a somewhat even keel during this turbulent period of my life; I say the GPS helps me. This is usually received with a somewhat odd look. I will explain with a personal story.

When the GPS in cars first came out my husband and I had just rented a car at LAX (Los Angeles) and as an introduction Hertz provided one such gizmo free of charge. I sat in the parking lot reading the instructions as my husband loaded our luggage into the car. When he got in I asked him if he wanted a woman’s voice giving directions or a man’s voice.

This turned into a psychological discussion about dealing with authority figures in an area where one feels super qualified. He finally decided, with a twinkle in his eye, that a woman was appropriate as he was used to taking “orders” from a woman. “Oh”, I said with a twinkle in my eye, “for example your mother.” In any case the gender of the voice was easily changeable if he thought differently about it as we drove to our destination.

I should add that we had lived in Los Angeles for over three years and been back many times a year since we left, so we knew short-cuts.

We began with the not-unpleasant female voice saying “take a right” and so forth. There was an area which we were familiar with and did not listen to her as we knew a short-cut. She – the voice on the GPS – began to get somewhat hysterical, telling us to “make a right NOW!!” We didn’t and there was a moment of silence and then she. said: “Re-calculating,” and began to give directions from our new location.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/uncategorized/sukkot-the-gps-and-mindbody-interventions/2012/09/27/

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