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April 25, 2014 / 25 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Chabad Lubavitch’

Chai’s Rabbi Metzger Pays $40 Million for Midtown Building Shared with Lubavitch

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

The NY Post reported that Rabbi Joshua Metzger has signed a contract to pay $40 million for the 12-story, 60,000-square-foot building at 509 Fifth Ave., in the middle of the block between East 42nd and 43rd streets, which is occupied by Metzger’s nonprofit Chai Foundation and Chabad Lubavitch of Midtown.

According to the Post, the signing will put a stop to several law suits which have been filed with the NY Supreme Court over the purchase of 509 Fifth.

Chanukah In Utah

Sunday, January 22nd, 2012

Utah Governor Gary R. Herbert and his wife Jeanette hosted Rabbi Benny Zippel and 150 guests from Chabad Lubavitch of Utah for a menorah lighting ceremony at the Governor’s Mansion in Salt Lake City during the recent Chanukah holiday.

Rabbi Weinberg Praised As Kiruv ‘Visionary’

Wednesday, February 11th, 2009

NEW YORK – Rabbi Noach Weinberg, the founder and dean of the sprawling global outreach operation Aish HaTorah, was being called a “unique visionary” following his death in Jerusalem.

Weinberg, a brilliant educator and charismatic lecturer, was suffering from cancer when he died Feb. 5 at his home. He was 78.

A pioneering figure in the ba’al teshuvah movement, the process of bringing secular Jews to Orthodox Judaism, he was the guiding force behind Aish HaTorah’s emergence as a leader of efforts to turn back the tide of assimilation.

With just five students, Weinberg founded Aish in 1974 in Jerusalem. It now occupies prime real estate opposite the Western Wall and encompasses dozens of branches around the world. About 100,000 people reportedly attend Aish programs annually in 77 cities in 17 countries.

The organization also operates a rabbinical training program in Jerusalem, a hesder yeshiva for Israeli soldiers and draws untold numbers of Jewish students and travelers to its introductory courses in Jerusalem and around the world. Aish.com, the organization’s home on the Internet, is among the most popular Jewish educational websites and features endorsements from a range of celebrities, including Steven Spielberg, Mikhail Gorbachev and Margaret Thatcher.

“Rav Noach was a unique visionary who believed that every Jew was innately interested in their Jewishness, but because of the lack of education was ignorant of the wealth of their heritage,” said Rabbi Yitz Greenman, the executive director of Aish HaTorah New York/Discovery. “He saw it as his mission to make Judaism relevant to an apathetic generation. He was incredibly successful over the last 50 years at reigniting the spark of Jewishness in hundreds of thousands of Jewish souls.”

Like the Chabad-Lubavitch movement, whose vast global network comprises what is probably the best known and most successful outreach effort in the Jewish world, Weinberg believed the greatest challenge facing Jewry today was the loss of Jews to ignorance, apathy and assimilation. He spoke of a spiritual holocaust that was depriving the world of more Jewish souls than the actual Holocaust. His disciples at Aish headquarters in Jerusalem would frequently invoke war metaphors to describe the struggle they were engaged in to save the Jewish people.

To drive the point home, Weinberg led a delegation of Aish rabbis to Poland in 2006, a journey that became the subject of a film, “From the Ashes.”

“Why did we come here? Why did I come and ask all the fellas, all the rabbis, to come?” Weinberg asks in the film. “To wake us up. The time is drawing closer. We are losing more neshamas [souls] every day than we’re gaining. We’re in trouble. We got to wake up.”

Weinberg is lauded for taking a non-judgmental approach to outreach. He welcomed atheists and non-believers to his yeshiva, saying he would make them better atheists. He even reportedly allowed a practicing Muslim to study at Aish, even though the student prayed five times a day to Mecca.

“A lot of Orthodoxy’s outreach was always tinged with judgmentalism – not always, but often,” said Samuel Heilman, a sociologist of American Jewry and a critic of what some observers describe as Orthodoxy’s rightward drift. “Both Chabad and Rabbi Weinberg found you could reach out to people without having to force them to deny who they were, and not be quite as judgmental. And that was a key element. Now we take that for granted.”

Unlike Chabad, Aish principally relies not on the warmth and charisma of its emissaries but on presenting a rational, cogent argument for God’s existence and the unique mission of the Jewish people. For a time, Aish was virtually synonymous with the popular Discovery seminars, a series of lectures on topics such as Bible codes, Genesis and the Big Bang, and Jewish history, that collectively attempt to present a logical and scientific case for the divine origins of the Torah.

Aish also differs from Chabad in another crucial respect: Chabad’s emissaries often are the children of emissaries themselves and the movement’s most dedicated cadre, steeped in its values from an early age and charged by the movement’s late leader, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, to retrieve Jewish souls from the far corners of the world.

Weinberg, after trying and failing several times to start outreach efforts in the 1960s and 1970s, realized he needed to populate his organization with individuals who once were secular. Only they, he believed, understood the urgency of the task.

“He had a way about him,” said Adam Jacobs, a rabbi at the Aish Center in Manhattan who first encountered Aish as a secular Jew studying at Brandeis University and eventually found his way to Jerusalem. “He was so focused on other people and it was so genuine the way he would interact with other people. He paid attention to people in a way I don’t recall seeing ever before.”

Rabbi Shalom Schwartz, one of the original group of students who joined Aish in 1974, said Weinberg always emphasized the need for students to apply their studies to real-world problems. He recalled Weinberg once blasted a Time magazine article that accused Israel of unleashing biblical justice on the Palestinians and, in later years, he insisted on confronting the threat of radical Islam.

“He was very, very concerned about the current rise of anti-Semitism and the situation in Iran,” Schwartz said. “He made a point of pressing whoever would listen to him that these are not normal times. This is a time when every concerned human being has to take up the cause of confronting militant Islam, and especially the threat from Iran, and that this is a responsible position of every caring – not only Jew, but every human being. This is from day one in his teaching.”

Greenman recalled once visiting Weinberg at his home on a Friday night. On entering, Weinberg’s young son was climbing up a pipe. Expecting the rabbi to scold his son for misbehaving, Greenman was shocked to discover him offer to lift his son on his shoulders so he could better reach the ceiling.

“That’s who Rabbi Weinberg was,” Greenman said. “He was a man who said to everyone, stand on my shoulders and I’ll help you go further. He helped every Jew try to reach the ceiling.” (JTA)

Senseless Love

Wednesday, December 24th, 2008

One month ago, humanity woke up to a very dark world.

Has there ever been such a clear-cut line drawn between good and evil, between darkness and light?

As we have all learned by now, Gaby and Rivki Holtzberg were two young Chabad emissaries, only in their twenties, who chose to leave the comforts of home and family to live in far away Mumbai, India, with the sole goal of bringing the light of Torah, of spreading greater joy and meaning to their fellow Jews.

The terrorists were also young  − in their mid-twenties, and they also chose Mumbai as their destination. They too were dedicated to their goal, and spent years in training for it  − but their goal was to darken lives, to bring pain and destruction, and wreak horror and havoc.

And this past week, though our world became a darker place, the clarity between these polar opposites, between good and evil, became as clear as day.

Unfortunately we live in a world where horrors happen. Too often, people die young, children are left orphans. Crimes and wrongs are needlessly perpetrated.

We usually read about these things. We sigh. We say how horrible they are and then moments later we continue on with our lives.

But with this atrocity in Mumbai, somehow we are all not just moving along. It is affecting us. We’re outraged. We’re incensed, consumed with sadness, with pain. We sense that this is somehow more tragic. Because of its senselessness. Because of the clearly drawn lines between the forces of good and the evil.

The end of the book of Daniel is a prophesy about our time, describing events as follows: At the end of days, things will become abundantly clear. Evil people will be exceedingly evil and good people, devoted to helping others, will shine like the bright stars in the sky.

So how do we react to this? What now?

We need to direct our outrage, our pain.

We need to follow the example of Rivki and Gabi, whose lives were dedicated to unconditional love and unity − of reaching out to every one of their fellow Jews as brothers and sisters, without judgment, without condescension, without focusing on differences − but only with love and unity.

On a very practical level, what does it mean to each of us?

We all have someone, against whom we harbor something −  a grudge, or a hurt that we still hold within our hearts.

“Maybe he shouldn’t have reacted the way he did”; “maybe she really did blow this out of proportion.” “Maybe he does have an uncontrollable temper,” and “maybe she really is too stingy.” And “maybe they really have an entirely different world view than my own.” Does it really matter? Isn’t now the time to get past that, get beyond our petty limitations to find the connecting threads of unity?

So, reach out. Pick up your phone and call that person that you haven’t spoken to for months. Get together with that relative. Gather around the Shabbat table. Gather around the beautiful Chanukah lights.

Let us make this year a year full of connections, heart-warming gatherings, of unconditional, absolute unity.

Let’s fight the senseless hatred in our world, with our own senseless love.

Because we want little two-year-old Moishele to grow up in a better world than the one he now knows − a world where there is no room for senseless evil, because it is filled with too much love.

[In honor of the shloshim for Rabbi Gavriel Noach (Gaby) and Rivka (Rivki) Holtzberg, directors of Chabad-Lubavitch of Mumbai, and all the other innocent souls who perished at the hands of terrorists in the Mumbai Terror Attacks.]

Watch a four-minute powerful video of “Senseless Love” on Chana’s In Touch video blog at chabad.org/779256 or chabad.org/InTouch.

Chana Weisberg is the author of several books, including Divine Whispers-Stories that Speak to the Heart and Soul and Tending the Garden: The Unique Gifts of the Jewish Woman. She is an international inspirational lecturer on a wide array of topics and an editor at chabad.org. She can be reached at cweisberg@chabad.org.

Senseless Love

Wednesday, December 24th, 2008

One month ago, humanity woke up to a very dark world.


Has there ever been such a clear-cut line drawn between good and evil, between darkness and light?


As we have all learned by now, Gaby and Rivki Holtzberg were two young Chabad emissaries, only in their twenties, who chose to leave the comforts of home and family to live in far away Mumbai, India, with the sole goal of bringing the light of Torah, of spreading greater joy and meaning to their fellow Jews.


The terrorists were also young  − in their mid-twenties, and they also chose Mumbai as their destination. They too were dedicated to their goal, and spent years in training for it  − but their goal was to darken lives, to bring pain and destruction, and wreak horror and havoc.


And this past week, though our world became a darker place, the clarity between these polar opposites, between good and evil, became as clear as day.


Unfortunately we live in a world where horrors happen. Too often, people die young, children are left orphans. Crimes and wrongs are needlessly perpetrated.


We usually read about these things. We sigh. We say how horrible they are and then moments later we continue on with our lives.


But with this atrocity in Mumbai, somehow we are all not just moving along. It is affecting us. We’re outraged. We’re incensed, consumed with sadness, with pain. We sense that this is somehow more tragic. Because of its senselessness. Because of the clearly drawn lines between the forces of good and the evil.


The end of the book of Daniel is a prophesy about our time, describing events as follows:
At the end of days, things will become abundantly clear. Evil people will be exceedingly evil and good people, devoted to helping others, will shine like the bright stars in the sky.


So how do we react to this? What now?


We need to direct our outrage, our pain.


We need to follow the example of Rivki and Gabi, whose lives were dedicated to unconditional love and unity − of reaching out to every one of their fellow Jews as brothers and sisters, without judgment, without condescension, without focusing on differences − but only with love and unity.


On a very practical level, what does it mean to each of us?


We all have someone, against whom we harbor something −  a grudge, or a hurt that we still hold within our hearts.


“Maybe he shouldn’t have reacted the way he did”; “maybe she really did blow this out of proportion.” “Maybe he does have an uncontrollable temper,” and “maybe she really is too stingy.” And “maybe they really have an entirely different world view than my own.”
Does it really matter? Isn’t now the time to get past that, get beyond our petty limitations to find the connecting threads of unity?


So, reach out. Pick up your phone and call that person that you haven’t spoken to for months. Get together with that relative. Gather around the Shabbat table. Gather around the beautiful Chanukah lights.


Let us make this year a year full of connections, heart-warming gatherings, of unconditional, absolute unity.


Let’s fight the senseless hatred in our world, with our own senseless love.


Because we want little two-year-old Moishele to grow up in a better world than the one he now knows − a world where there is no room for senseless evil, because it is filled with too much love.


[In honor of the shloshim for Rabbi Gavriel Noach (Gaby) and Rivka (Rivki) Holtzberg, directors of Chabad-Lubavitch of Mumbai, and all the other innocent souls who perished at the hands of terrorists in the Mumbai Terror Attacks.]


Watch a four-minute powerful video of “Senseless Love” on Chana’s In Touch video blog at chabad.org/779256 or chabad.org/InTouch.


Chana Weisberg is the author of several books, including Divine Whispers-Stories that Speak to the Heart and Soul and Tending the Garden: The Unique Gifts of the Jewish Woman. She is an international inspirational lecturer on a wide array of topics and an editor at chabad.org. She can be reached at cweisberg@chabad.org.

Bar Mitzvah In The Tundra

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2008

 


For every Jew alive today, even the most unobservant, it’s necessary to only go a couple of limbs up the family tree to find an observant predecessor. If you peek far enough, sometimes you can find amazingly special people in the family, from famous rabbis to strong matriarchs. For one unassuming family in the cold hinterlands of Alaska, that was just the case.


 


In Alaska one finds plenty of snow, moose and oil, but few Jews. There are less than 6,000 in the entire state. Half of the Jews live in the city of Anchorage, so when Rabbi Yosef and Esther Greenberg arrived in Alaska in 1991 they set up the Chabad-Lubavitch Jewish Center of Alaska there. Handfuls of Jews also live in remote towns and cities such as Sitka, Kenai, Ketchikan and Kotzubue. Rabbi Greenberg flies to these areas, sometimes in a seaplane, to prepare boys for their bar mitzvahs, put up mezuzahs and teach Jewish classes.


 


The Greenberg’s annual Chanukah party has always been their most popular event. At the 1993 party, Rabbi Greenberg noticed a new couple among the many familiar faces. He introduced himself and spoke to them for a few minutes but did not expect to see them again.


 


A few months later the wife called Rabbi Greenberg and asked him if he could train their son for his upcoming bar mitzvah. Their son had never been to Hebrew school and couldn’t read Hebrew. His parents had not even planned for their son to have a bar mitzvah. However the boy’s elderly grandmother from Los Angeles was persistent that her grandson have one, so to make her happy the couple was now turning to Rabbi Greenberg for help in preparing him for it.


 


Rabbi Greenberg tutored the boy, teaching him Hebrew and training him to say the blessings on the Torah. Finally the Shabbat of his bar mitzvah arrived and the boy’s extended family flew in from all around the country.


 


The bar mitzvah was beautiful. The boy read the blessings, and Rabbi Greenberg chanted the Torah portion and Haftorah.


 


During lunch in the synagogue after services, the boy’s grandmother asked for permission to speak. She stood up and explained why it was so important to her for her grandson to have a bar mitzvah.


 


First she was worried that living in Alaska, her grandson would grow up without a Jewish identity. Therefore she wanted to make sure he would at least have a bar mitzvah.


 


Second, the grandmother related that she had moved to the United States from Russia many years earlier. She rarely attended synagogue, but fondly remembered receiving a strong Jewish education in her youth. She grew up in the town of Berditchev, and a private teacher came to her house every day to teach her and her siblings Jewish subjects. When Jewish observance was banned after the Russian Revolution of 1917, her religious education ceased.


 


Why did her parents value Jewish education so much, and why did she push so hard for her grandson to have a bar mitzvah?


 


“It was very important to me to make this bar mitzvah because of my family tree”, she continued, now looking directly at Rabbi Greenberg. “My family − we come from a big rabbi. Maybe you’ve heard of him. His name was Rabbi Yisrael Ba’al Shem Tov.”


 


Rabbi Greenberg’s jaw dropped. The Ba’al Shem Tov founded the Chassidic movement in the 1700s, of which Chabad-Lubavitch is a part. Two hundred years later, the Ba’al Shem Tov’s efforts helped provide his descendents in Alaska with an authentic Jewish experience and a point of entry to return to Jewish observance.


 


After lunch Rabbi Greenberg approached the grandmother and said he had a piece to add to her story. Rabbi Greenberg said he himself is a ninth-generation descendent of the Maggid of Mezritch, who was the foremost student and successor of the Ba’al Shem Tov. So here in Alaska was a descendent of the Maggid of Mezritch helping to bring back a descendent of his teacher the Ba’al Shem Tov.


 


In the years since the bar mitzvah, the young man and his family have become more observant. Hashem specifically sent Rabbi Greenberg to Alaska because He knew that the deep relationship between the Ba’al Shem Tov and his student would help his descendents return. Plus, G-d knew that the many merits of the Ba’al Shem Tov would remain in the family and be a spiritual catalyst to bring them back.


 


“All Jewish children running around the world are the grandchildren of Tzaddikim and Tzadekot,” Rabbi Greenberg said. “If your child or grandchild was going away from Judaism, wouldn’t you fight to get him back? The Baal Shem Tov was crying in heaven.”


 


Michael Gros is the Chief Operating Officer of the Jewish outreach organization The Atlanta Scholars Kollel. The Teshuva Journey is a monthly column chronicling amazing teshuva journeys and inspiring kiruv tales. To share a story or send other comments, email michaelgros@gmail.com. To receive the column via email or see back issues, visit http://www.michaelgros.com.

The Singular Experience

Wednesday, December 13th, 2006

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14

         After Work Schmooze, ages 20′s and 30′s. Makor – Steinhardt Building, 35 W. 67th St., Manhattan. 7 p.m. 212-601-1000. www.makor.org

 

         Central Park Night Ice Skating, Wollman Skating Rink. 7 p.m. Sponsored by Makor – Steinhardt Building, 35 W. 67th St., Manhattan. 212-601-1000. www.makor.org


CHANUKAH, DECEMBER 16-23

         Chanukah Singles Event. 8 p.m. Location disclosed upon registration. NO CHARGE. Small groups of men and women (10 men and 10 women) will come together at a designated home each night of Chanukah. Event is ONLY for Shabbos- and kosher-observant individuals. Registration is required, so as to be able to match people with some similar backgrounds. Light refreshments will be served. 718-375-9593.


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16

         Chanukah celebration. Speed dating for ages 30-60. Chabad Lubavitch of Sheepshead Bay, 1315 Ave. Y, Brooklyn. 917-742-8445. $18.


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 17

         Chanukah Party at Kings Bay Y, 3495 Nostrand Ave., Brooklyn. 11:30 a.m. 718-648-7703 x 230.

 

         Midrash Ora V’Simcha Gala Chanukah Party. 3110 Kings Highway (E. 31st St at Nostrand Ave.), Brooklyn. 2:30-5 p.m. Free. Sponsored by Joel Mordechai Arbiser, M.D. RSVP: 718-951-0500.

 

         Coffee, Cake and Conversation singles group will host a Chanukah get-together from 2:30-5 p.m. at 1467 East 31 Street (corner Kings Highway), Brooklyn. Attendance is free. Music and light food will be offered. Call 718-375-1049, 212-928-5091 or 718-853-2796.


MONDAY, DECEMBER 18

         Sophisticated Singles, ages 35-55. Roundtable Rap. JCC, 15 Neil Ct., Oceanside, L.I. 7:30 p.m. 516-766-4241 x 133. www.friedbergjcc.org  

 

         Social, ages 55+. JCC, 15 Neil Ct., Oceanside, L.I. 7:30 p.m. 516-766-4241 x 133. www.friedbergjcc.org 


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19

         Sushi and Latkes: Japanese Chanukah Singles Party, ages 30-49. 7:30 p.m. JCC on the Palisades, 411 E. Clinton Ave., Tenafly, N.J. 201-569-7900.


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21- SUNDAY, DECEMBER 24

         Shabbos Chanukah Weekend, sponsored by “Flakey” Jake. Somerset Marriot in N.J. 718-436-0682.


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21

         After Work Schmooze, ages 20′s and 30′s. Makor – Steinhardt Building, 35 W. 67th St., Manhattan. 7 p.m. 212-601-1000. www.makor.org 


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23

         Chanukah Rock ‘n’ Bowl. 8:30 p.m. at Bowler City in Hackensack (85 Midtown Bridge Approach), N.J. Sponsored by the JCC on the Palisades. 201-569-7900.

 

         Shabbat Chanukah Luncheon at the Young Israel of Flatbush, 1012 Ave. I., Brooklyn. Please join us for tefillot in the main synagogue, to be followed by kiddush and a catered, singles only luncheon. 8:45 a.m. Payable to the Young Israel of Flatbush and mail to: Joel Roth, 1119 Ocean Parkway, Apt. 4-F, Brooklyn, N.Y. 11230. Donna: 718-633-8835; Joel: 718-377-4127; Sheldon: 718-434-4623; Suri: 718-338-1347; Marty: 718-951-2560. E-mail: Shelsurfer@aol.com 


MONDAY, DECEMBER 25

         Sophisticated Singles, ages 35-55. Roundtable Rap. JCC, 15 Neil Ct., Oceanside, L.I. 7:30 p.m. 516-766-4241 x 133. www.friedbergjcc.org 

 

         Social, ages 55+. JCC, 15 Neil Ct., Oceanside, L.I. 7:30 p.m. 516-766-4241 x 133.  www.friedbergjcc.org 

 

         Chinese Lunch at noon. Rabbi Fingerer will discuss his new book, Adults Only, a provocative and engaging book on topics ranging from human sexuality to solving global war on terror. JCC on the Palisades, 411 E. Clinton Ave., Tenafly, N.J. 201-569-7900 ext. 435.


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28

         After Work Schmooze, ages 20′s and 30′s. Makor – Steinhardt Building, 35 W. 67th St., Manhattan. 7 p.m. 212-601-1000. www.makor.org 


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 31

         EndTheMadness will be hosting a private dinner at a Manhattan restaurant with Dr. Michael Salamon, author of Every Pot Has Its Cover. Open to a select group of 24 singles (12 men and 12 women), ages 35 and under. 6:30 p.m. www.endthemadness.org 

All Around The Town

Wednesday, December 13th, 2006

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13

         Anger’s Way Out – Helping Children Deal With Their Feelings. Join author and counselorKarin Biron-Deckel, as she discusses her new book Anger’s Way Out. 7:30 p.m. Friedberg JCC, 15 Neil Court, Oceanside, L.I. 516-766-4341 ext. 114. www.friedbergjcc.org.

 

         Rich Cohen, author of Sweet and Low, will speak as part of Jewish Book Month at the JCC, 411 E. Clinton Ave., Tenafly, N.J. 8 p.m. 201-569-7900 x 233.

 

         “The Last Days” – film screening at Rosenthal Center for Holocaust Studies, CUNY, 265 Fifth Ave., N.Y.C. 6:15 p.m. 212-807-1949.


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14

         The Tanya: GPS For The Soul, by Rabbi Shlomo Yaffe, introduces concepts of Chassidic spirituality in: “The Tanya: GPS For the Soul – Navigating Your Way Through Life”. 7 p.m. Chabad Lubavitch of Midtown Manhattan, 509 Fifth Avenue. 212-972-0770.

 

         “Beyond Eruv” – Winner, Best Feature Documentary. Screened at Makor, 35 West 67th Street (between CPW and Columbus Ave.), Manahttan. 212-601-1000. www.makor.org

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 15

         Russian Shabbat: Join RJeneration, a dynamic social network of young professionals with Jewish roots and Soviet heritage. Hear from journalist Boris Fishman, author of a recent article in The New Republic, “Glasnost Grows in Brooklyn.” 7 p.m. RSVP. Makor, 35 West 67th Street (between CPW and Columbus Ave.), Manhattan. 212-601-1000.  www.makor.org


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16

         Shabbat Luncheon, with singing by Nachum Deutsch. Yorkville Synagogue, 352 E. 68th St., N.Y.C. Shacharit at 9 a.m. Divrei Torah by Rabbi J.D. Bleich. 212-249-0766.

 

         Sephardic Music Festival. Makor, 35 West 67th Street (between CPW and Columbus Ave.), Manhattan. 8 p.m. 212-601-1000. www.makor.org


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 17

         Chanukah Party. Friedberg JCC, 15 Neil Court, Oceanside, L.I.  11 a.m. 516-766-4241. www.friedbergjcc.org

 

         Dreidel House, featuring Small Wonder Puppet Theater. Chabad Lubavitch, 419 E. 77th St., N.Y.C. 11:45 a.m. 212-717-4613.

 

         Chanukah Art Fair, ages 3+. Jewish Museum, 1109 Fifth Ave., N.Y.C. Noon; Gallery Tour, ages 8-12 at 10:30 a.m.; Concert, Hot Pea’s and Butter Celebrate Chanukah, ages 3+ at 2 p.m. 212-423-3271.

 

         Sephardic Concert and Scholarship Series. 8 p.m. Makor, 35 West 67th Street (between CPW and Columbus Ave.), Manhattan. 212-601-1000. www.makor.org

 

         The Menorah: Symbol of Truth – talk by Rabbi Eliyahu Kirsh. Beth Chaim Learning Center. 8 p.m. 718-851-1237. Call for location.


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19

         The Bnai Zion Chanukah Party. 7:30 p.m. High Chai, 18 Avenue B, on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. 212-725-1211 ext. 222.

 

         Rosh Chodesh program for women. JCC, 411 E. Clinton Ave., Tenafly, N.J. 7:30 p.m. 201-569-7900.


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 20

         The Art of David Schwab – reception and talk at the Friedberg JCC, 15 Neil Court, Oceanside, L.I. 7:30 p.m. 516-766-4241 ext. 114. www.friedbergjcc.org.

 

         The Chai Center will “Light up the Night” with a giant outdoor menorah at the intersection of Deer Park Avenue and Vanderbilt Parkway.  501 Vanderbilt Pkwy., Dix Hills. 6 p.m. 631-351-8672. mail@thechaicenter.com

 

         Menorah Lighting at the Plainview Shopping Mall, Woodbury Rd. at S. Oyster Bay Rd. junction. 4 p.m. 516-682-0404. Town of Oyster Bay Chabad.


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21

         Makor Dreidel Slam. Makor, 35 West 67th Street (between CPW and Columbus Ave.), Manhattan. 212-601-1000. www.makor.org

 

         All-night Chanukah bash featuring live klezmer by the Alex Kontorovich Trio, theater performances and ninja puppetry with Dov Weinstein. Latkes, jelly doughnuts and wine included. 7:30 p.m.

 

         Chanukah Party. Israel American Foundation. Workmen’s Circle, 45 E. 33rd St., N.Y.C. 2 p.m. 212-869-9477.


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 24

         Zionism: Yesterday and Today – talk by Rabbi Eliyahu Kirsh. Beth Chaim Learning Center. 8 p.m. 718-851-1237. Call for location.

 

         Jewish walk and talk of the Lower East Side with Dr. Phil. Meet outside Katz’s Deli, 205 E. Houston St., N.Y.C. 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. 888-377-4455.


MONDAY, DECEMBER 25

         Family gallery talks, storytelling and art workshops. 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Jewish Museum, 1109 Fifth Ave., N.Y.C. 212-423-3271.

 

         Jewish walk and talk of the Lower East Side with Dr. Phil. Meet outside Katz’s Deli, 205 E. Houston St., N.Y.C. 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. 888-377-4455.


DECEMBER 25-JANUARY 1, 2007

         18th annual Yeshivas Yarchei Kallah of Flatbush. One Week Kollel at Congregation Bais HaKnesses, 1040 East 17 St. (near Ave. J). 9-5 daily. Call 718-998-5822 to enroll.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/community/all-around-the-town/2006/12/13/

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