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September 29, 2016 / 26 Elul, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘challenge’

Ousted DNC Chair Wasserman Schultz Facing Florida Primary Challenge Tuesday

Tuesday, August 30th, 2016

Former DNC chair, Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fl) who was forced to resign on the first day of the Democratic convention in July because of leaked emails showing her conspiring against then presidential candidate Bernie Sanders’ campaign, is facing off Sanders-backed, law professor Tim Canova. Presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton has given her support to Wasserman Schultz, saying she needs her “in Congress, by my side, working day after day.” Especially should the need arise to block Senator Sanders, presumably.

Wasserman Schultz could be in for a tough election Tuesday, with predictions of a low turnout combined with Canova’s Sanders-backed fundraising. A recent public poll gave Wasserman Schultz 50% of the vote, compared with Canova’s 40%, but a Canova camp internal poll shows him trailing by 8 point. Meanwhile, Wasserman Schultz’s internal polling gives her 59% to Canova’s 26%.

In her role as DNC chair, Debbie Wasserman Schultz’s proxies on the party platform committee combined forces with Hillary Clinton’s proxies to block Sanders’ proxies anti-Israel proposals.

David Israel

Parshas Korach: The Ultimate Challenge

Friday, July 8th, 2016

If I Were The Devil
By Paul Harvey  

I would gain control of the most powerful nation in the world;
I would delude their minds into thinking that they had come from man’s effort, instead of G-d’s blessings;
I would promote an attitude of loving things and using people, instead of the other way around;
I would dupe entire states into relying on gambling for their state revenue;
I would convince people that character is not an issue when it comes to leadership;
I would make it legal to take the life of unborn babies;
I would make it socially acceptable to take one’s own life, and invent machines to make it convenient;
I would cheapen human life as much as possible so that lives of animals are valued more than human beings;
I would take G-d out of the schools, where even the mention of His name was grounds for a lawsuit;
I would come up with drugs that sedate the mind and target the young, and I would get sports heroes to advertise them;
I would get control of the media, so that every night I could pollute the minds of every family member for my agenda;
I would attack the family, the backbone of any nation. I would make divorce acceptable and easy, even fashionable. If the family crumbles, so does the nation;
I would compel people to express their most depraved fantasies on canvas and movies screens, and I would call it art;
I would convince the world that same-gender marriage is natural, and that their lifestyles should be accepted and marveled at;
I would convince the people that right and wrong are determined by a few who call themselves authorities and refer to their agendas as politically correct;
I would persuade people that religion is irrelevant and out of date; the Bible is for the naïve;
I would dull the minds of believers, and make them believe that prayer is not important, and that faithfulness and obedience are optional;
I guess I would leave things pretty much the way they are!

 

The Zohar (Chelek 3, 176) writes that when Korach incited a coup d’état against Moshe, he challenged “peace” itself. In so doing, he also challenged Shabbos and Torah, both of which are referred to as peace.

What does the Zohar mean? How can one physically challenge “peace” and what is the connection with Shabbos and Torah?

The Nesivos Shalom explains that peace is not merely the absence of divisiveness and discord. G-d created the world so that it exists based on a joint giver-taker relationship. The moon reflects the light of the sun, and the earth is nourished from the rain which descends from the sky, etc. Human relationships, primarily the male-female relationship, also contain this type of synergy. The male’s role is to provide, while the female’s role is to accept what the male contributes and to then enhance and develop it. The world itself also includes this form of relationship, as it is merely an anteroom to the World to Come.

G-d is the only “force” that is completely sovereign and independent. The rest of creation, however, requires a dynamic giver-taker relationship. On a spiritual level, too, every generation is guided and led by its leaders who are privy to a greater level of clarity of Torah knowledge. Therefore, the masses must look to its sagacious scholars for guidance and direction about the Torah’s expectations in every given situation. In fact, the transmission and perpetuation of Torah has always been from teacher to student, father to son.

The Zohar explains that all physical blessings are granted as a result of Shabbos observance. The Ohr HaChaim HaKadosh (Bereishis 2:1) explains that when G-d created the world He only instilled it with the ability to exist for six days. After that time, the world should have instantly reverted back to a nebulous wisp of nothingness. It was only the observance of Shabbos which infused the world with a resurgence of energy that allowed the world to exist for another six days, and another, and another…

Rabbi Dani Staum

Iran: Can Rouhani Deliver?

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Originally published at the Gatestone Institute.

By Nir Boms and Shayan Arya

Last week, more than 250 Iranian steel workers gathered in front of the Supreme Leader’s residence in protest against unjustified layoffs and unpaid salaries. They were not the only ones. Reports from the past week revealed a dozen other such protests and strikes that range from a tire company, cable workers, the cinema association and even employees of Iran’s Ministry of Youth Affairs.

Protests and demonstrations are not that common in Iran; their last wave was met with harsh repression and violence. Now they have spread again and become more brazen. Signs again read “Down with the dictator,” while police used tear gas in an attempt to scare protesters away.

A combination of international sanctions and domestic mismanagement has resulted in rapidly rising unemployment and restive unemployed youth. The worsening economic conditions were also a key driver for the vote for change which took place in Tehran during the last Presidential election. But change is still a long way off.

Rouhani’s victory by such a wide margin was not just a testament to his politics, but seemingly a total rejection of the more conservative candidates more closely aligned with the widely despised supreme leader, Ayatollah Khamenei.

Rouhani’s campaign symbol was a giant golden key, which he waved at rallies to symbolize his ability to open locked doors. To an Iranian electorate all too familiar with locked doors in every aspect of their lives — both domestic and international — even the remote possibility of things getting better was irresistible. But now that Rouhani has been elected, he may find it difficult to deliver on his promise.

Rouhani, to be sure, will face a mountain of problems, even compared to those of his predecessors. Iran’s international isolation has never been so severe. There is virtually no segment of Iran’s economy, or for that matter of Iranian society, that has been immune to the ill effects of the economic sanctions. In less than a year, Iran’s currency has lost two-thirds of its value against the dollar; and even by the most optimistic estimates, inflation is above 30%, with unemployment reaching similar proportions among urban youth.

Iran’s economy is under attack from two major fronts: international sanctions and domestic mismanagement inherent in the Islamic system.

Sanctions are not a new phenomenon there. Previous sanctions were imposed in response to the Islamic regime’s international support for terrorism and Iran’s dismal human rights record. But the more stringent sanctions now afflicting Iran were levied in response to the country’s nuclear program — and these are the crippling sanctions Rouhani needs to undo. To accomplish such a change, a change of policy is required. In addition to the nuclear issue, any negotiations for lifting sanctions obviously need to include Iran’s abandoning support for Hezbollah, its involvement in Syria, its continued support of other terrorist groups, as well as the Assad regime that continues to slaughter its people.

Rouhani’s first challenge is that he does not hold the keys to most of these issues. Iran’s policies on the nuclear issue, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, international terrorism and supporting the Assad regime are the sole purview of Iran’s supreme leader. No president has ever been able to enter these domains in any meaningful way, let alone alter them substantially; these issues have, in fact, always been sources of tension and discreet friction between presidents and the supreme leader.

Another challenge lies in the United States Congress. As many of the sanctions against Iran have been embedded in laws, it would take a Herculean effort on the part of President Obama to convince the legislative branch to change them. Even if the president were to decide to “trust” Rohani, he would still need to convince Congress. Given the political atmosphere in Washington, it is unlikely the president would even consider risking his remaining political capital on lifting sanctions without being able to demonstrate substantial progress in changing Iran’s course.

A third challenge lies on the domestic front. Here Rouhani must face an endemic system of corruption, in addition to gangs of Revolutionary Guards [IRGC], who have extended their control over almost every aspect of Iran’s economy, government, military and security apparatus. To change that, Rouhani would have to tackle the IRGC and their powerful ally, the Supreme Leader Khamenei, who sees them as his extended arm for controlling Iran and key to the Islamic regime’s survival.

Guest Author

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/iran-can-rouhani-deliver/2013/07/31/

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