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April 20, 2014 / 20 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Chancelor and Rosh HaYeshiva’

The True Character of Great Leaders

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

If anyone ever had any doubt about the character of this great man, this should completely erase any trace of it. Rabbi Dr. Norman Lamm has resigned his post as Chancelor and Rosh HaYeshiva of Yeshiva University in one of the most poignant resignation statements I have ever read.

What was exceptional about this is his admission that – although he thought he had acted correctly at the time – he now realizes that he had made some grave mistakes in handling accusations of sex abuse by a teacher and principal in Yeshiva University’s high school, MTA.  The following is the pertinent part of his statement:

I recognize now that when we make decisions we risk, however inadvertently, the tragedy of receiving that calamitous report: tarof toraf Yosef, “Joseph is devoured,” all our work is in vain, all we have put into our children has the risk of being undone because of a few well intentioned, but incorrect moves. And when that happens—one must do teshuvah. So, I too must do teshuvah.

True character requires of me the courage to admit that, despite my best intentions then, I now recognize that I was wrong. I am not perfect; none of us is perfect. Each of us has failed, in one way or another, in greater or lesser measure, to live by the highest standards and ideals of our tradition — ethically, morally, halakhically. We must never be so committed to justifying our past that we thereby threaten to destroy our future. It is not an easy task. On the contrary, it is one of the greatest trials of all, for it means sacrificing our very egos, our reputations, even our identities. But we can and must do it. I must do it, and having done so, contribute to the creation of a future that is safer for innocents, and more ethically and halakhically correct.

This is the kind of leadership that is needed in Klal Yisroel… the ability to recognize error, to realize just how serious and possibly even damaging that error is, and to learn from it. How different is this response to the way Satmar, and Lakewood have reacted to their own errors on this same matter. In Satmar’s case convicted sex abusers are nonetheless glorified as innocent people that evil people with nefarious motives lied about and put in jail. In Lakewood’s case the prominent Rabbonim, Poskim and Dayanim signed a vicious attack against one of their own Talmidei Chachamim because he did what he was supposed to do by reporting a sex abuser to the police. As Rabbi Daniel Eidensohn points out:

(T)hese expert rabbis apparently also didn’t bothering checking out the fact that the father had in fact received a letter from Rav Sternbuch telling him that he was required to report the abuse.

They were apparently ignorant of the elementary fact that even without receiving a psak from Rav Sternbuch and other gedolim the father not only had the right to report a child abuser but was obligated according to the views of the gedolei hador including Rav Eliashiv, Rav Wosner, the Tzitz Eliezer and Rav Moshe Halberstam.  Their ignorance of the halachos dealing with child abuse – as clearly described in Yeshurun volume 15 -  is truly shameful and embarrassing.

Dr. Lamm is a Gibor… a mighty man who has the courage to do what lesser men cannot or will not do. It does not matter how much Torah they know, or how brilliant their erudition of it is to their students. It doesn’t even matter how many Seforim they have published. The matter at hand is their character. They have willfully destroyed another man’s character using their Torah knowledge as a spear to skewer him.

The man they skewered had the courage to do what’s right. It superseded his own sense of self preservation. A man whose character runs circles around those who are supposed to be Torah leaders and are probably still seen that way by most of their constituents in Lakewood and Satmar.

Those men could learn a thing or two from one of their own, R’ Dovid Epstein, who upon realizing the truth – made a public and heartfelt apology, begging for forgiveness for his part in hurting an innocent human being.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/haemtza/the-true-character-of-great-leaders/2013/07/02/

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