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Posts Tagged ‘Chicken Soup’

‘First Jewish Leader of the Labour Party’ Enjoys Yiddish, Chicken Soup, But No Marxism

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

“I am not religious. But I am Jewish. My relationship with my Jewishness is complex. But whose isn’t?” writes the leader of the Labour Party and of the opposition in parliament, Ed Miliband, in the New Statesman.

Miliband is painfully aware of his heritage: “As children we were only dimly aware of it but we caught glimpses. When I was seven, my family went to visit my grandmother in Tel Aviv. Pointing at a black-and-white photograph, I demanded to know who was ‘that man in the picture.’ I remember being taken swiftly out of the room and then being told quietly that he was my grandfather David, who had died in Poland long before I was born. It was only some years later that I realized my mum’s father had died in a concentration camp, murdered by the Nazis for being Jewish.”

Edward Samuel Miliband graduated from Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and the London School of Economics. He started out as a television journalist and then as researcher for the Labour Party. He became a confidant of Chancellor Gordon Brown and was appointed Chairman of the Treasury’s Council of Economic Advisers.

When Gordon Brown became prime minister, he made Miliband his Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, followed by an appointment to Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change. In 2010, Miliband was elected Leader of the Labour Party.

“For me, my Jewishness and my Britishness are intertwined,” the man who may be Britain’s future prime minister writes. “My parents defined themselves not by their Jewishness but by their politics. They assimilated into British life outside the Jewish community. There was no bar mitzvah, no Jewish youth group; sometimes I feel I missed out.”

Still, although he married a non-Jew, Miliband has no doubts about his Jewish roots. “My mum got me into Woody Allen,” he recalls, “my dad taught me Yiddish phrases (there is no better language for idio­matic expressions, some of them unrepeatable). And my grandmother cooked me chicken soup and matzo balls.”

As to the influence his home had on his political thinking, Miliband writes: “I was not indoctrinated with Marxism. Nor was I brought up with religion. But I was given a sense that the world could be a better, fairer and different place. And we all have a duty in our own way and our own time to seek to make it so.”

Conservative Benjamin Disraeli (elected 1837) was the first Jewish leader of a political party, and first Jewish prime minister of the United Kingdom.

Sir Julius Vogel was the eighth premier of New Zealand from 1873 to 1875 and again in 1876. Current prime minister of New Zealand John Key and former prime minister Francis Bell are of Jewish extraction, both from the mothers’ side.

Soup

Thursday, January 12th, 2012

This column will focus on making cooking easy and simple. We begin with a perennial favorite dish – Chicken Soup.

There have been so many volumes written about chicken soup – so many recipes and so many ingredients. I have always thought the most important ingredient ever added to chicken soup was the love of a yiddishe mama.

Now, my chicken soup is a whole production – but I don’t cook soup every week, I use a 20 quart pot and make enough for a few weeks. And then I have more than soup. As you will see over the next few columns, when I am done, I have carrots and potatoes for potato salad, I have vegetables to make into side dishes and much more. Once you see how much one pot of soup can produce, you will agree that it is worthwhile to try.

My Chicken Soup Recipe

 

Ingredients

Water to cover, plus 3 cups

3 – 4 knuckle bones and/or other bones (I love knuckle bones, they give body and taste to the soup and are delicious to eat. Chicken bones are messy, not so flavorful and it’s hard to remove them from the soup.)

4 – 8 chicken quarters (Or more as needed)

1 – 10 carrots (Carrots add sweetness to the soup. You can put in one or ten—it’s up to you.)

1 – 2 zucchini (Zucchini is a great vegetable. It needs to cook for only a short time and can be used peeled or unpeeled.)

4 – 10 cloves garlic (Garlic adds taste and vitamins.)

1 potato (Potatoes add very little flavor to the soup, however, it is a good way to cook them for other dishes. Just keep in mind that they cook faster than some of the other vegetables and tend to sink to the bottom. If you are using them, be sure to fish them out long before the soup is ready or they will disintegrate.)

1 onion (I generally discard the onion once the soup is ready.)

1 sweet potato (This is a great soup vegetable – it adds a lot of sweetness.)

1″ – 2″ piece ginger (Ginger has a very strong taste; a little piece the size of a thumb can be detected in a large quantity of soup.)

1 kohlrabi (This is a great addition to the soup. Kohlrabi is a versatile vegetable that can be served on it’s own or added to other dishes.)

1 chayote (This vegetable can be found at most fruit stands. It looks like a flattened green pear and the taste is similar to a kohlrabi.)

1 small butternut squash

1 jicama (This vegetable is a newcomer in my kitchen, but a welcome one. It tastes like a sweet turnip.)

2 – 3 stalks celery

2 – 3 parsnips

1 celery knob

½ of a Fennel (Fennel tastes like licorice.)

¼ of a Rutabaga (Rutabaga is a large ball, half yellow and half purple.)

¼ of a head of cabbage

½ a head of Cauliflower or one bag frozen

1 bunch parsley greens (Parsley is added at the last 10 minutes of cooking.)

Salt, pepper, garlic powder, paprika

About 2 tbsps chicken soup mix without MSG

Directions:

Put bones, chicken, and any other meat you would like to use that Shabbos, into your largest pot, cover with water and bring to a boil. As soon as it boiled, turn off the heat, take the whole pot to the sink and pour everything out. Rinse all the pieces and the pot, return only the chicken and meat to the pot, add enough water to cover plus 2 to 3 additional cups and bring to a boil. Then reduce heat to a low simmer.

Now add the vegetables. First add the root vegetables, the ones that cook the longest, such as carrots, kohlrabi, onions, chayote, etc. Cook until tender, remove, and add the other vegetables. Don’t forget to take out the chicken quarters after about 35-50 minutes of cooking. Last, add the parsley greens.

Simmer on low for four hours.

After putting so much effort into cooking chicken soup, don’t waste a drop. Drain the soup through a sieve; the clear soup should be stored in covered plastic or glass containers, divided according to your family size. Keep in the refrigerator overnight. In the morning, skim off the fat and then put the containers into the freezer.

(By the way, any combination of the above vegetables can be used in chicken soup. If you are short on time the minimum is carrots, onion, garlic and parsley added to chicken and water. Cook for about an hour on a low flame after it has boiled.)

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/food/recipes/soup/2012/01/12/

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