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April 24, 2014 / 24 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘China’

China Welcomes Peres in Bid for Closer Business Ties

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

China gave President Shimon Peres the royal welcome Tuesday, with Chinese President Xi Jinping stating that the Jewish people and the Chinese share a common opposition to militarism and fascism.

Xi added that China wants to continue high-level exchanges with Israel and establish stronger ties and cooperation in the fields of technology, agriculture, medical treatment, environmental protection, energy and education.

“We have full confidence in the China-Israel relationship,” Xi said.

Peres called the Chinese a peace-loving people, an interesting twist on China’s love for its own people whom they kill often kill for the sake of the regime’s own peace.

Peres, of course, also talked about the peace process, which he said China can help advance.

Chinese Businessman Looking to Buy NYT: I’m Just as Smart as Jews

Thursday, January 9th, 2014

A Chinese businessman who is determined to buy an American newspaper said he is just as smart as the Jews who own some of those newspapers.

Chen Guangbiao, chairman of Jiangsu Huangpu Recycling Resources, who made his fortune in recycling construction materials in China, announced late last month that he would travel to New York to meet with shareholders of The New York Times in order to acquire the newspaper. His premature announcement led to the cancellation of the Jan. 5 meeting, according to Forbes.

Earlier this week, Chen said in an interview with Sinovision, a New York-based Chinese television station, that he was investigating whether The Wall Street Journal is for sale.

He said that he was aware that many American newspapers are owned by Jews, and that his IQ, or intelligence quotient, and EQ, or emotional quotient, are “equally competent” as those Jewish owners.

He also added that he is “very good at working with Jews.”

Dutch Funds Divest from Israeli Banks but not from Occupied Tibet

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014

A Dutch pension administrator has divested from five Israeli banks over their activity in the Judea and Samaria as a matter of “responsible investment policy” but it retains its investments in Chinese banks operating in Tibet on land widely seen internationally as land occupied by China.

The pension investment company PGGM announced its decision to divest from Bank HaPoalim, Bank Leumi, First International Bank of Israel, Israel Discount Bank and Mizrahi Tefahot Bank on Tuesday on its website.

The text cited the banks’ “involvement in financing Israeli settlements in the occupied Palestinian territories. This was a concern, as the settlements in the Palestinian territories are considered illegal under international humanitarian law.”

PGGM had a marginal investment of several dozen millions of dollars in Israeli banks out of billions it invests all over the world, according to the NRC Handelsblad daily. The paper reported PGGM was Holland’s second-largest pension administrator.

In its statement, the company also cited its “responsible investment policy,” which excludes investing in bodies involved in “violations of fundamental human rights and labor rights.”

But according to a document released by the company in 2013, PGGM investments abroad include two Chinese banks – Bank of China and China Construction Bank — with offices and activities in Tibet, which is widely seen internationally as land occupied by China. PGGM also invests in China Petroleum & Chemical Corporation, or Sinopec, which is exploring for oil in Tibet.

PGGM’s international investments also include the Malaysian palm oil producer Sime Darby, which last year paid a million dollars in reparations to villagers in Liberia amid accusations that the firm had violated their human rights and confiscated their property.

PGGM spokesperson Maurice Wilbrink declined to answer JTA’s questions on the scope of his company’s investments in Chinese firms active in Tibet, explaining the figures were confidential.

Israel Loses Case to Gag Witness in Bank of China Terror Trial

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

An American family, whose son was killed in a suicide attack in Israel, has won its argument in a U.S. court against the Netanyahu administration that has been trying to muzzle testimony by a former intelligence officer.

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu formerly told the family of 16-year-old Daniel Wurtz that it supported letting Uri Shaya testify against the Bank of China, which is charged with having handled terrorists’ monetary transactions.

Wurtz and 10 others were killed in the attack in Tel Aviv in 2006.

The Mossad has helped the Wurtz family prepare its case, but the Israeli government last month made an about-face and told the court that testimony by Shaya might reveal state secrets.

Wurtz’ family in the lawsuit accused of surrendering to pressure from China, which happens to be Israel’s fourth largest lender.

“The complaint was filed only after the GOI (Government of Israel) repeatedly assured my attorneys that it would provide cooperation and support for our allegations,” Daniel’s father, Yekutiel Wultz, said in a written declaration, Reuters reported.

Israel Must Learn Taiwan Lesson and Grow Up

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

Nations have no permanent friends or allies, they only have permanent interests. Paraphrasing Lord Palmerston (Henry John Temple)

While Israel and the United States share some common, fundamental values, in reality, they have very different interests.

The most basic example is the Middle East.

America’s first priority in the region is to keep the oil flowing, and reduce reliance on any single country for that resource.

Israel’s top priority is survival.

Iran is the best example of where these differences come to a head.

Israel is rightfully worried that Iran wants to commit nuclear genocide against it. America, on the other hand, is not overly concerned about an Iranian attack, but would definitely like to see Iranian oil flowing into the U.S., while keeping Iran out of Russian hands.

It fits well into an American Middle East strategy, that Iran, whatever its regime, would have a working relationship with the U.S.

That doesn’t mean that the U.S. would destroy Israel to satisfy Iran, but the it has no problem with Israel paying a price in exchange for Iran’s friendship.

Think Jimmy Carter, China and Taiwan. Back in 1979, Carter switched his allegiance from Taiwan to the People’s Republic, practically overnight. It’s what superpowers do.

This leaves Israel in a dilemma.

Iran will get nuclear missiles, because it plans to get them – at all costs. The U.S. wants a rapprochement with Iran, and a few nuclear bombs aren’t going to stand in the way of that. Israel attacking Iran, on the other hand, would.

Israel doesn’t have too many initial options here.

Israel can pressure the U.S. Congress to try to reduce the size of the bus Israel gets pushed under. Israel can attack Iran alone, and pray that it’s strong enough, and be prepared to endure the consequences it will face from the U.S. and from an Iranian retaliation. Or Israel can keep its mouth shut, ride out the Obama storm, and be prepared to eventually face off with a nuclear Iran, with expansionist goals, protecting its proxies on Israel’s border with its nuclear umbrella.

There is another option that Israel can take.

Israel can grow up, and cut the American umbilical cord.

Israel needs to diversify.

It needs to go out and begin building better and deeper relationships with other strong countries – Russia included. It doesn’t need to cut its ties with the US, but it does need to end its complete reliance on the US, because Israel’s interests and US interests are not the same.

It doesn’t need to be big moves either. Simply buying some military from Russia would give Israel customer (not client) status, and that would change all the relationships. The US would also be faced with a choice, and pushing Israel under the bus would have consequences for the US in return.

Israel could then play those relationships off one another, just like the big boys do.

The U.S. had been holding back parts of Israel’s economy, specifically that of the military industry. Israel can begin selling its systems that compete with the US’s military industry. It’s well known that Israel’s war tech is superior, and selling a few major systems would do well for the Israeli economy.

And finally, Israel can apply Israeli law over Area C, and unilaterally declare that the price for a nuclear Iran, is an Israel with borders that we believe are needed for our protection, as well are historically and legally ours. The Arabs in Areas A are free to run their government and live their lives however they want, as long as they don’t attack us or attempt to harm us in any way.

Taiwan manages to thrive and grow, despite the Chinese shadow, and its president being persona non grata in Washington (even if it is now trying to build a relationship with China)

Israel has a lot more going for it than Taiwan.

A little growing up, and a little diversity never hurt anyone.

Visit The Muqata.

Chinese Fund Donates $130 million to Technion

Sunday, September 29th, 2013

A Chinese fund, bankrolled by the country’s richest man, is donating $130 million Technion University in a joint venture between the Haifa-based university and Shantou University (STU) to build a new academic facility in Guangdong Province.

The contribution from the Li Ka Shing Foundation is the largest in Technion’s history and one of the largest ever to an Israeli university.

The Guangdong Province and the city of Shantou are earmarking an additional $147 million to fund construction of the new Technion Guangdong Institute of Technology (TGIT) next to Shantou University.

The donation to Technion, made possible in part by profits from the fund’s recent  sale of Waze to Google, will be allocated for the Technion’s home campus.

Tel Aviv University to Set up Life Sciences Center in China

Friday, September 13th, 2013

Tel Aviv University and China’s Tsinghua University have signed a Memorandum of Understanding for strategic cooperation in innovative research and teaching, with an investment of hundreds of millions of dollars.

A new research center in China initially will focus on life sciences and nanotechnology but later will include other sciences and high-tech, Globes reported.

The new “XIN” center will recruit researches and students in Israel and China.

Tel Aviv University president Prof. Joseph Klafter said that founding the new center is a sign of how much China looks to Israel for innovation.

Will Israeli Companies be Israeli in the Future?

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013

Are we rapidly approaching the day when most Israeli mega food companies will not even be Israeli? Nestle already owns a sizable share of Osem and PepsiCo holds a major stake in Strauss.

Now comes word that China’s Bright Food Group is in talks to buy Tnuva Food Industries. Could you imagine an Israeli food company owned by a Chinese company?

It may indeed be the days of the Moshiach (Messiah). Bright Food has over 3,300 retail stores across China and is known in the country for its dairy and White Rabbit candy. It is on a global buying spree and has bought majority holdings in Australia’s Manassen Foods and UK cereal maker Weetabix.

Tnuva is Israel’s largest food company and according to controlling shareholder Apax Partners LLP, the company holds 14% of Israel’s food retail shelf space. Apax and investment partner Mivtach Shamir Food Industries Ltd. acquired a 77% stake in Tnuva for more than $1 billion in 2008. I can already see a session between the two companies where the Tnuva people are explaining their different kashrus standards.

But as usual, there are so many ways to look at this possible acquisition. One is that Israeli companies have been so successful in producing and marketing quality food that they have attracted international attention. It is a tribute to the Israelis that some of the largest and most powerful food conglomerates are looking to gain a piece of the action and apply some of the unique Israeli technology and success to their efforts worldwide.

Second is that the Israelis are securing an infusion of capital to further develop their economy.

So much for the positive. My question is how will Israelis feel when they eat the Chinese Leben or drink the milk at breakfast. Maybe they won’t feel anything so long as the products are good and kosher.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/will-israeli-companies-be-israeli-in-the-future/2013/09/10/

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