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April 18, 2014 / 18 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘clashes’

Three Dead in Kiev Protests (Video)

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014

Police shot and killed two three protesters in violent clashes on Wednesday between stick-wielding demonstrators and security forces in Kiev, the capital of the Ukraine. A third protester died after a fall.

Prime Minister Mykola Azarov blamed the deaths on opposition leaders and claimed that the police did fire live bullets.

The violence escalated after three days of protests over the two-month-old political crisis, which worsened when President Viktor Yanukovych changed course from an expected signing of a long-anticipated cooperation deal with the European Union.

The clashed were sparked by his success in passing legislation against protesters.

Today the Brotherhood, Tomorrow Hamas

Tuesday, January 14th, 2014

After crushing the Muslim Brotherhood at home, Egypt’s military rulers are going after Hamas in the Gaza Strip, senior Egyptian security officials told Reuters on Tuesday. Now they go about toppling Hamas, which took over in Gaza in 2007.

Last month, Egypt’s public prosecutor accused Hamas of conspiring with the Brotherhood and Iran to launch terrorist attacks in Egypt.

“We know Hamas is the Brotherhood and the Brotherhood are terrorists and no country could develop with terrorists in or around it,” the security official said.

Wait – is anybody writing this down? Someone should tell Bibi that the Egyptians have finished reading his book and are now busy applying his ideas. The good ones, before he turned his back on them.

Since rising to power in a military coup in the summer, the Egyptian junta has been laboring to undermine Gaza’s economy by destroying the bulk of the 1,200 tunnels used to smuggle food, cars and weapons. In that area, too, Egypt has been a lot more heavy handed than the IDF. Essentially, using a team of bulldozers, the Egyptian army, over a period of ten days or so, razed everything that stood up alongside the Gaza border up to where the Israeli border begins. They created a broad no man’s land over the caved in tunnels, making passage into their side a life threatening proposition.

Egypt’s Junta has cracked down hard on the Brotherhood, to the point where nowadays almost its entire leadership and thousands of its rank and file members are behind bars.

And so, today, while Egyptians continue to vote on the first day of polling in the constitution referendum – their junta’s first electoral test since Mohamed Morsi’s ouster in July; and while as many as nine Egyptians have already been killed in local clashes, the new Pharaohs are setting their sights on another target.

“Gaza is next,” one senior security official told Reuters. “We cannot get liberated from the terrorism of the Brotherhood in Egypt without ending it in Gaza, which lies on our borders.”

It looks like Hamas will be facing growing resistance and street protests, much like those that took down two consecutive regimes in Egypt (until the junta got it right). The rulers of Cairo will be financing and supplying these protests, until Hamas cries uncle and takes a boat ride to Turkey.

Assuming they’ll still have friends up there by that time.

Egypt does view Hamas as an existential problem, seeing as the terrorist government has been supporting al Qaeda-inspired gangs that attack security forces in the Sinai peninsula. According to Reuters, those attacks have longs since crossed the Suez Canal and spread to Egypt’s large cities.

A Hamas official said the comments made to Reuters by Egyptian officials “showed Cairo was inciting violence and trying to provoke chaos.”

Yes, I admit, some news items are more fun to write than others. This one – top ten.

The Hamas forces are estimated at 40,000 soldiers, police and security forces. They rule over a population of 1.8 million people, if any of those numbers can be trusted.

“We know that Hamas is powerful and armed but we also know that there are other armed groups in Gaza that are not on good terms with Hamas and they could be used to face Hamas,” another Egyptian security source told Reuters. “All people want is to eat, drink and have a decent living, and if a government, armed or not, fails to provide that, then the people will rise against it in the end.”

And, naturally, the more people starve, the easier it will become to lure them out into the streets, at which point the Hamas thugs will crack down on them, cameras will snap, mayhem will erupt, until something will give.

Pro Bedouin Land Grab Hooligans Send 10 Police to Hospital

Sunday, December 1st, 2013

On Saturday, Israel’s Bedouin community declared a “Day of Rage” to protest the government’s intent to hand over to them only part of the Negev, based on the Government’s Prawer-Begin plan, which takes back some land from squatters.

The main rallies took place in Haifa, where hundreds of hooligans blocked traffic, burned tires and threw rocks at police. They injured at least ten police, including the chief of the Coast District and the spokesperson for the Negev District. Police responded with shock grenades and with quite brutal crowd control measures.

There was another Arab demonstration outside the Shchem gate in East Jerusalem. Dozens of Arabs threw rocks on police there as well.

The signs being carried in those rallies threatened that should the Bedouins not receive better than half the Negev, they’d start a third Intifada.

It’s what they do.

The Prawer Commission, chaired by Ehud Prawer, Benjamin Netanyahu’s director of planning, found, back in 2011, that an estimated 50% of unrecognized Bedouin villages were built within Jewish planning areas. It recommended that the inhabitants of these villages, some 30,000 Bedouin invaders, entering Israel illegally from the vast Arabian deserts over the past six decades—about 40% of the total unrecognized Bedouin population—should be relocated to the seven existing government built Bedouin townships.

The commission proposed compensation payments to the evacuees, between $1.7 billion and $2.4 billion, including $365 million for expanding the approved townships. The compensation would be reduced to zero over a period of five years and if agreement had not been reached the land would be considered forfeited.

Then, in January, 2013, Israel’s government approved the recommendations of then Minister without portfolio Benny Begin, backed by AG Yehuda Weinstein, to change the program.

Benny Begin’s “stinking maneuver” not only confirmed through legal registration what has been essentially an illegal land grab of many thousands of acres by the Bedouins over several decades, but also promised them many new settlements to boot.

Benjamin Netanyahu’s Likud-Beitenu was so committed to this move, that they forced Jewish Home, their National Religious partner, to approve in the coalition agreement item 51 which reads: Both sides will promote the “Law regulating Bedouin settlement, 5772-2012,” should a Jewish Home minister be a member of a ministerial committee to implement said law.

Please don’t forget, it’s a crucial detail: Both Netanyahu and Avigdor Lieberman supported the Benny Begin plan that gave more than half the Negev to Bedouin invaders.

But Jewish Home and Yesh Atid, together with most of the rank and file coalition members, managed to introduce significant changes to the Begin plan, after it had already been approved by the transitional government after the election. The change, essentially, eliminated the Begin plan in favor of the original 2011 plan, which was approved a much less generous land giveaway to the Negev Bedouin.

MK Ahmed Tibi said the Prawer plan is tragic, since it removes civilians from their land.

By civilians Tibi means Arab civilians, because he had no problem at all approving the forcible removal of thousands of Jewish civilians from Gaza and from Samaria.

Tibi also made sure the press understood he was not behind the violent clashes with police, since, as he put it, “we object to violence, but we are in favor of rage.”

It’s that kind of subtlety that we need more of in mass public demonstrations.

The Jewish Left is united in calling on the government to reward the violent demonstrators by freezing the Prawer plan.

And Avigdor Lieberman, who initially approved the Begin land grab, now compared the confrontation with the Bedouins the historic Jewish reclamation of land in Zion over the past century and a half.

Better late than never.

51 Dead in as Egyptians Celebrate 40th Anniversary of Yom Kippur War

Monday, October 7th, 2013

Deadly clashes erupted in Cairo on Sunday as pro-Morsi marches protesting the military junta rule headed to Tahrir Square, where thousands were cheering the same junta, celebrating the 40th anniversary of the army’s 1973 “victory” against Israel.

Confrontations there and outside Cairo resulted so far in the death toll rising to 51, according to Al Ahram, with 268 injured.

Egypt’s Interior Ministry said security forces arrested 423 people during clashes in Cairo and Giza.

The National Alliance to Support Legitimacy, a coalition of Islamist forces supporting deposed president Mohamed Morsi, said at least 11 had been killed in clashes with security forces in Ramses Street in central Cairo.

Official news agency MENA also reported that gunshots were heard amidst the clashes on Ramses Street.

Backers of Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood have staged thousand-strong marches in several parts of Cairo, Giza and other governorates, Al Ahram reported.

Rallies took a violent turn in central Cairo’s Garden City and Giza’s Dokki district, where police fired rounds of teargas after local residents clashed during pro-Morsi protests heading towards Tahrir, eyewitnesses and Ahram Online reporters said. The sound of heavy gunfire was later reported, as well as army jets and F-16 fighters hovering in formations over Cairo, Alexandria and other cities.

Each year, Egypt’s army traditionally celebrates the state holiday commemorating the October war against Israel—which eventually led to the recovery of the Sinai Peninsula through peace negotiations—with military performances and flyovers.

Egypt has been gripped by prolonged violence since the overthrow of Morsi on 3 July after mass demonstrations against his turbulent year in office.

The ouster of the former elected president, which was part of a roadmap agreed upon by many political groups and the armed forces, has enraged Islamists who have denounced the move as a violation of democratic “legitimacy.”

Hundreds were killed on 14 August when security forces moved to forcibly disperse two protest camps set up by Morsi loyalists in Cairo and Giza, unleashing days of violent turmoil and deepening polarization.

Militants elsewhere have taken up arms against the state. The army has been battling an insurgency in the Sinai Peninsula, adjoining Israel and the Palestinian Gaza Strip, where Islamist terrorists have mounted almost daily attacks on security and army targets, killing dozens.

More Clashes in Turkey, Police Use Tear Gas, Water Cannons

Saturday, July 6th, 2013

Police in Istanbul fired water cannons and tear gas at thousands of protesters in Taksim Square.

Protesters converged on the site Saturday, blatantly disregarding warnings to stay away. Organizers said they intended to march into the adjacent park that has been cordoned off by police.

The area has been the site of anti-government protests and clashes with police since late May, when police forcefully broke up a demonstration against a government plan to develop the park for commercial use. At least three civilians and one policeman have been killed, and many more injured, during the past month.

Protesters are angry at Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has threatened to use the army to disperse demonstrations, if necessary.

Another Illegal Arab Outpost Erected amid Violence

Saturday, February 2nd, 2013

Some 200 Arabs on Saturday erected a new tent outpost south of Shchem, resulting in clashes with Jewish residents which left one teen injured.

The Arabs set up tents near Burin village, in an area which is slated for acquisition by the Jewish residents of the village of Yitzhar.

Israeli forces immediately moved to shut down the area, and blocked traffic at the nearby Zaatara checkpoint, stopping several buses full of left wing activists and Arab demonstrators, Ma’an reported.

IDF Soldiers fired tear gas and sound grenades to disperse the Arabs, and detained five.

At Yitzhar junction, Arabs and Jews began to clash, throwing stones at each other. According to the Arabs, a boy from the village of Burin was wounded in the leg by a settler. The army said that the report of the shooting is not verified, and the Civil Administration did not receive a complaint about the incident.

The tents set up in the outpost the Arabs called “Almnatir” have not yet been cleared.

The Arabs are calling the new encampment “Al-Manatir neighborhood” after the traditional stone huts built for watchmen in Palestinian agricultural land.

This is the third illegal outpost erected by the Arabs, in what appears to be a new trend of Arab expansion in Area C territory, which is recognized as governed by Israel.

Yitzhar spokesman Avraham Binyamin said tonight that “due to the provocation of leftists and Arabs, dozens of residents went down to start a protest vigil at Yitzhar junction, and dozens of Arabs began throwing stones at them. One of the Jewish protesters was wounded in the head from a stone and was taken to hospital.”

According to Binyamin, the Border Police at the scene did not arrest the srtone throwing Burin villagers, which led to a stone throwing response from the Jews.

An Israeli military spokesman said forces used riot-dispersal means when Arabs threw rocks at them.

The Arabs are saying their illegal outpost was established to protest Israeli land acquisition for settlement building. Burin is squeezed between the Bracha and Yitzhar settlements.

Deadly Riots in Egypt in Worst Crisis since Morsi’s Election

Saturday, January 26th, 2013

At least 30 people were killed and 312 were wounded in Egypt on Saturday, after 21 Port Said soccer fans were sentenced to death over a violent stadium riot last year.

The violence came one day after protest rallies against President Mohamed Morsi on the second anniversary of Egypt’s uprising against predecessor Hosni Mubarak, in which nine were killed.

This is the worst crisis Morsi has faced since his election.

Just minutes after the sentencing in Cairo of the soccer fans, blamed for the deaths of 74 people during post-match clashes last February, protesters rampaged through the city, attacking police stations and burning tires.

Relatives of the condemned fought security forces in an attempt to storm the Port Said prison where they are being held. The attackers used automatic weapons. Police responded with tear gas.

(In Cairo, on the other hand, there were cries of joy at the verdict, as women ululated and relatives of the February victims hugged each other and shouted “Allahu Akbar.”)

Crowds of protesters stormed two Port Said police stations exchanging heavy gunfire with the cops. Ambulances were running all day long, rushing the injured to hospitals. Local mosques asked worshippers to donate blood.

The army finally overtook the Port Said prison, the banks and the courts, to prevent their falling into the hands of rioters.

Armed Forces spokesperson Ahmed Ali said that troops from the Second Field Army are controlling all the main areas around Port Said’s main prison, where the defendants from the Port Said trial are being held.

Clashes also broke out in Suez, on the canal where eight people were killed on Friday.

Protesters tried to storm the main Suez police station, but were stopped by police with tear gas.

Meanwhile, Egypt’s opposition parties are planning to boycott the upcoming parliamentary vote, unless Morsi manages to calm the violence.

The National Salvation Front, comprised of parties opposing the Islamist president, are demanding a “national salvation” government, otherwise it would boycott the elections.

Saturday’s violence came after a day of clashes that marked the revolution’s second anniversary—at least nine people were killed and 530 injured.

Tens of thousands on Friday protested against Morsi, accusing him of failing the revolution and being nothing but an agent of the Muslim Brotherhood.

Early on Saturday, Morsi Twitted an appeal for calm that asked “citizens to adhere to the values of the revolution, express opinions freely and peacefully and renounce violence.”

Protesters in the canal city of Ismailiya stormed government buildings on Friday, and burned down the Muslim Brotherhood headquarters.

The Muslim Brotherhood accused opposition groups of “spreading sabotage.”

In a statement Saturday, the Brotherhood said that the opposition’s silence after attacks against its offices and Freedom and Justice Party headquarters amounted to them “gloating over Egypt and Egyptians,” and accused opposition groups of supporting such attacks.

The group also accused the media of misleading the public, “spreading hatred” against the regime and inciting “sabotage.”

In Cairo, police fired tear gas at protesters outside the presidential palace.

IDF Clash with Border Police for Shooting at Jews

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013

On Tuesday afternoon, clashes resumed in the village of Esh Kodesh, after Israeli Border Police permitted nearby Arabs to plow the land between the settlements of Esh Kodesh and Achiah, Hakol Hayehudi reported.

Named after the Piaseczna Rebbe, the renowned spiritual leader of many Chassidim in Auschwitz, Esh Kodesh is a 22-family village overlooking the Jordan Valley (2400 ft above sea level), some 25 miles north-east of Jerusalem. Its neighbor Achiah is another 22-family village.

The Esh Kodesh residents have argued that it shouldn’t take dozens of Arabs to plow one field – one tractor could do the job quite proficiently. Also, seeing as it is well past the plowing and sowing season, they view the “plowing” as nothing more than sheer provocation on the part of their Arab neighbors, and a clear threat to the security of their village.

Residents of the community along with many supporters, who have endured severe clashes with the police earlier in the day, returned en masse to the disputed area and tried to prevent the plowing with their bodies. As usual, the Jewish locals were treated brutally by the border cops, who fired tear gas and stun grenades directly into the group of Jewish civilians, which included women, children and babies.

A group of IDF reservists who had been ordered to the area to secure the plowing Arabs, ended up defending the Jewish civilians from the cops.

“A Druze Border Police officer named Yusuf commanded the event and totally freaked out,” said a resident of Esh Kodesh to Hakol Hayehudi. “He fired tear gas canisters into a group of women and children and used severe violence. At some point a large group of reserve soldiers arrived and once they saw what was happening, they started shouting at the Border Police: ‘Are you crazy? Are you screwed in the brain?’ and demanded that they stop firing on children.”

According to the residents, the police officers themselves then started to debate their own conduct. “The soldiers shouted at them: ‘We are one nation,’ and ‘Look who you’re shooting at,’ and more talk like that, and they became confused and started arguing among themselves.”

One resident related that the debate between the soldiers and the border cops grew louder and turned into mutual cursing. “At some point, the Border Police just became too annoyed at the soldiers and told them: Let’s see you get by here by yourselves, climbed into their jeeps and drove off,” he said.

The Arabs, who had only managed to plow a few meters, saw that they were deserted by their security guards and began to flee. “Once they no longer had the backing of this Druze officer, the Arabs simply turned around and drove quickly away,” said one resident.

In earlier incidents, four Jews were arrested in clashes in the area. An Esh Kodesh resident was arrested by border policemen in the most brutal and violent manner, and later a resident of Givat Gulat Zion was arrested after being asked to present an ID card by police detectives who positioned road barriers separating the settlements of Gush Shilo. Two boys were also arrested, one because the cops claimed he was wanted for questioning, and the other after he refused to show his ID card. Both were released after a few hours, according to the Honenu legal aid society.

During the clashes Jews shattered the windows of a car owned by an Arab who was driving on the country road connecting the villages of Kotzra and Jalud. The driver was sprayed with pepper gas and sustained injuries from stones thrown at him. He was evacuated for medical treatment. The Arabs of Jalud also complained that some Jews had cut down a number of olive trees near their village.

The IDF informed the Jewish residents that the Arab plowing of the fields near their community will continue despite their protests. The residents, for their part, are preparing additional days of clashes and call upon all those who care about the village’s security to come to the area and help prevent the plowing.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/idf-soldiers-clashing-with-brutal-border-police-for-shooting-at-jews/2013/01/02/

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